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1957 Chevy Bel-Air

okie35okie35 Member Posts: 3
edited July 2015 in Chevrolet
I have a 1957 Chevy Bel-Air 2 door post hardtop that was my parents that I'm wanting to sell. What are the best ways to go about this as to not get screwed.. It has been completely restored

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    isellhondasisellhondas Member Posts: 20,342
    By "completely restored" I hope you mean back to near factory specs without a bunch of mods.

    I would pick up a copy of Hemmings Motor News so you can get an idea of what others are ASKING for similar cars. Is it a "post" or is it a "hardtop"? It can't be both. the hardtops will bring more money but the post models are popular too. The powertrain has a lot to do with value too. Few people would want a six cylinder.

    If it's a 283 with Powerpack and it isn't a Turboglide, you have a car that is in high demand.

    Price it too high and it won't sell so just be realistic. It is what it is.
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    PF_FlyerPF_Flyer Member Posts: 9,372
    One way would be to poke around like you're looking to buy one rather than sell. See what people are asking and getting for vehicles in similar condition, and in your area (an important factor as well. Check out auction sites. See what buyers have been willing to pay. You could also pay for an appraiser to get a value for you.

    Just remember, "your mileage may vary"... even identical cars selling in the same area can go at different prices.

    Got a picture of the car to share?? B)
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    texasestexases Member Posts: 10,736
    Engine? Transmission? Options? Sedan or hardtop? Original or modified?

    I check the 'completed listings' on Ebay for similar cars to get a rough idea what a car sells for, as opposed to asking prices.
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    Mr_ShiftrightMr_Shiftright Member Posts: 64,481
    It's not easy to come up with a price you'd want to count on unless we interrogated you rather exhaustively about it. The value can vary wildly, absurdly really, depending on the car's options, condition of the paint, upholstery, if it has been restored underneath, history, matching #s. There is "restored" as in "show quality, better than new in every respect, every nut and bolt top to bottom redone", or "cosmetically restored" meaning a decent paint job, some new parts, looks great from 10 feet away, underneath pretty much "old car" (suspension not painted, older bushings, some minor leaks, exhaust system has surface rust, etc).

    I have a suggestion. Put it on eBay with a very detailed description and lots of photos. This will cost you...what? $100 bucks or so? $125?. Then, put a very high reserve on it, like $500,000 dollars.

    Now you ask, why would I purposely put up an auction that will fail? Answer: Because after the auction you have both a free appraisal from around the world--what the world things your car is worth and b) a list of potential buyers you can contact by e-mail to cut a deal.

    There is no better accurate appraisal than an eBay one, because it is buyers who set the market.

    If you don't want to do that, hire a professional appraiser to value it.

    If you don't want to do that, give it to a reputable classic car cosignor who has a nice showroom. He'll take $15 but he can reach customers you can't. You both agree on a price you want "in your pocket", he'll put his add-on into it, and then one day you get a check in the mail. Done.
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    okie35okie35 Member Posts: 3
    It's a 2 door hardtop with a 283, it was restored to original with the exception of an inline fuel filter. It spent many days at car shows, it's turquoise & ivory
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    okie35okie35 Member Posts: 3



    This is basically what it looks like, down to the interior color
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    isellhondasisellhondas Member Posts: 20,342
    Fender skirts...WHY!

    If your 57 looks like this one you have a car that is very desirable and should be easy to sell IF you are realistic on the price.
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    Mr_ShiftrightMr_Shiftright Member Posts: 64,481
    Low $40Ks if it's nice, but really, I'd have to see it. Could be more, could be less. Prize-winning trailer queen (never driven) with nut and bolt rotisserie restoration could hit $60K. If it's just "old car" underneath, or the paint is not professional, or engine bay is not spotless, or lots of body filler, then deduct accordingly off the low $40Ks.
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    steverstever Guest Posts: 52,454
    I learned to drive stick on a friend's '57 Chevy. Three on the tree.

    Man, I hated that car LOL.
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