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Best Vehicle for Elderly/Limited Mobility Drivers

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    steverstever Guest Posts: 52,454
    "A new in-depth report released today by the UK's IAM (Institute of Advanced Motorists contradicts the common assumption that older drivers are a danger on the roads, comprehensively proving that drivers over 70 are no more likely to cause crashes than any other driver, and are indeed, considerably safer than younger drivers.

    The report shows that older drivers are safer than young drivers. Just eight per cent of drivers are currently over 70 years of age, and they are involved in around four per cent of injury crashes; fifteen per cent of drivers are in their teens and twenties but are involved in 34 per cent of injury crashes."

    Older drivers - Safe or unsafe? (Gizmag)
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    euphoniumeuphonium Member Posts: 3,425
    Old Farts haven't learned how to use Cell 'phones or know how to text. So, naturally they're safer drivers. ;)
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    ateixeiraateixeira Member Posts: 72,587
    We'd also have to look at crashes per mile, because after retirement they likely drive less distance, too.

    I'm not saying grandpa is unsafe, just that we should look at wrecks-per-mile, not per person.
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    gagricegagrice Member Posts: 31,450
    That could get a bit complex. Odds of a fender bender in town are higher than in a rural setting. While high speed injury accidents are more likely in a Highway or rural setting.

    I am sure gadgets such as cell phones will be the number one cause of all accidents and all age groups in the not too distant future.
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    michaellnomichaellno Member Posts: 4,120
    We'd also have to look at crashes per mile, because after retirement they likely drive less distance, too.

    I'm not saying grandpa is unsafe, just that we should look at wrecks-per-mile, not per person.


    Exactly ... my folks bought a new Hyundai Sonata in the spring of 2003. Almost 7 years later, the car has less than 24K on the clock.

    My dad's '70 Chevy pickup - which he bought new - has less than 140K on the body after 40 years. The top end of the engine was rebuilt around 95K.
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    ateixeiraateixeira Member Posts: 72,587
    Check out the Auto Access Seat - great if you carry around elderly folks or people with moderate disabilities:

    http://www.autonews.com/article/20100118/VIDEO/301189875/1354

    Not for the driver, but still a very cool feature.

    They will still sell a full ramp van if the driver needs it.
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    steverstever Guest Posts: 52,454
    Be kinda cool for pulling up next to your favorite fishing hole. I can just see my mom sitting in it. :shades:

    image (link)
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    ateixeiraateixeira Member Posts: 72,587
    OK, I caught a big one.

    Reel ME in. :D
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    fezofezo Member Posts: 10,384
    24K on a 2003? Hey, if they want to sell it sign me up! I'll drive it back home....
    2015 Mazda 6 Grand Touring, 2014 Mazda 3 Sport Hatchback, 1999 Mazda Miata 2004 Toyota Camry LE, 1999.
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    michaellnomichaellno Member Posts: 4,120
    24K on a 2003? Hey, if they want to sell it sign me up! I'll drive it back home....

    What, and put on 13% more miles on the trip from CA to NJ? I think not. :P

    I spent most of last week driving it around as I was out visiting the folks. GLS V6 with the 4-speed auto with the manual override slot on the transmission. Burgundy with tan cloth interior, faux wood on the dash. Dad likes to call it his "Jaguar" since the front end reminds him of one. Nice car. I think they paid around $18K for it back in 2003. They were all set on getting a Camry then my dad found that the Hyundai uses a thicker gauge steel and that they could get the V6 for the same price as a 4-cyl Camry.

    What's interesting is that the OEM Michelins had to be replaced around 20K ..

    Unfortunately, nobody will inherit the car as it, along with almost all of my parents' assets, are owned by a trust that will be split up when they pass. As I understand it, everything is to be sold and converted to cash, then divided up between me, my sister and our 4 kids.
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    fezofezo Member Posts: 10,384
    Oh, I love the idea of driving it from California to NJ! I don't however, think this sounds likely to happen.
    2015 Mazda 6 Grand Touring, 2014 Mazda 3 Sport Hatchback, 1999 Mazda Miata 2004 Toyota Camry LE, 1999.
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    caitlyncaitlyn Member Posts: 1
    Hoping my message will update some answers. I too am looking for an SUV that's is low enough to get in (I must be able to sit down and not lift up my leg to get in) and high enough to get out of i.e. without having to pull myself up (muscle atrophy). I have a Subaru Forrester which is fine to get in but getting out is no longer something I can do with two bad knees & arthritis. The seats are sedan-size low. Plus higher cars have a wide lip preventing me from just leaning my butt against the seat and getting in. I am 5'4 and basically need a 29-30" high seat (the forrester is 26" from the seat to the ground). My physical therapist has literally measured all this for me as I hunt for my new car.
    I am looking at the Ford Escape but am paranoid as I fell getting into a Toyota Highlander which, to a petite person like me, was a bus.
    Thank you for your thoughtful responses. Also, you'd think salespeople or their managers would be more accomodating afterall helping someone out will lead to a possible sale and good word of mouth.
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    ateixeiraateixeira Member Posts: 72,587
    What year is your Forester? The 2009 and newer models are higher. You might find they're right where your "sweet spot" is in terms of seat height. Driver's side is power height adjustable on our 09 Limited, too.
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    lmpalmer1lmpalmer1 Member Posts: 3
    Hopefully someone's still watching this thread. I created another thread outlining my problem, but I'll copy it here and maybe get some more exposure/answers.

    Asking this question on behalf of my grandmother, who is in the market for a new car and has asked me to help. She currently drives an '03 Camry and has one major complaint that has her looking for another car: she has severe arthritis in her hands and the steering wheel is too stiff for her to turn comfortably or easily. The steering wheel isn't stiff in general (I have no trouble with it), but her hands are so weak that steering has become a serious problem, and that's obviously not a minor problem to have when dealing with a car.

    I've been trying to research models whose steering wheels are more easily manipulated than others, but almost nothing has come up. I get a lot of hits for heated steering wheels, but that's not going to help much.

    I'd be grateful for any suggestions for cars with what I guess you might call a flexible steering wheel. There may be an industry or insider term for that; if there is I don't know it. As far as other requirements go, she wants a 4-door automatic sedan, preferably not American, and price really isn't a concern (unless Lamborghini's are famed for having forgiving steering wheels, in which case that would be a tad overboard). Very grateful for any help anyone can give me.
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    Mr_ShiftrightMr_Shiftright Member Posts: 64,481
    You mean, by "stiff", too hard to turn side to side or that the material has no "give" when you grasp it?
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