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Importing Car into Canada from US

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Comments

  • tmaliktmalik Posts: 27
    Firstly, you will likely need to make two trips. One trip presumably to inspect the car before deciding on the purchase. Then you won't be able to bring in the car right away. US customs need documentation at least 72 hours prior to your crossing the border, so you won't be able to drive the car across the border the day you purchase. Read elsewhere in this forum and the net for details.

    Secondly, if you do wire funds, you're not carrying them with you across the border, so nothing to declare. If you held cash, bank draft or money order when you cross, then you have something to declare. But not a wire transfer as that is an electronic transfer of funds.

    No surprise that wire transfers can take 2 business days. That is standard response from a bank. They usually happen the same business day as long as your bank starts the process early enough, but can take more than 1 day to show up on the recipient's bank account, especially Canada to the US.
  • Hi mlhoopr,

    I found Nissan Xterra to be a good candidate for profit - made in USA so no duty; and if you can register and sell in Alberta then PST is not an issue. See if you agree ...

    In the mean time, would you mind sharing with us the importing process, especially how you titled your Mitsubish (which state? did you have residency status? how long did it take?) and how you got your recall clearance (when - before coming back home or after, and from whom?)

    Thanks
  • Ok, well my first word of advice is to go to the RIV website because they have lots of useful information and a 1-800 # that I used many times for info.

    As for your questions, I bought my mitsubishi's in Florida and drove them back to Ontario. I used my Ontario drivers licence. You do not need any state ID to buy a car in Florida. When I returned to Canada I followed the RIV instruction on how to register the cars in Ontario.

    The Complete process took less than 3 weeks, yet most of the time was spent working on my cars to install the daylights. When I arrived back in Ontario I simply called the mitsubishi dealership here and requested the re-call letter, it was free!

    Thanks for the response on my original question, if anyone has anymore info on which type of cars to import in to Canada for profit, please let us know!!
  • glau1glau1 Posts: 1
    I am very new to this forum, I hope someone can help me about importing a car, I bought a used car in New Jersey, Do I need a title document under my name crossing the canada custom? I do have a title certificate but is under the first owner name..... I did asked US custom, they said is okee.... So what about crossing Canada custom? Can anyone help me? thanks
  • ohturoeyohturoey Posts: 1
    Hi everybody,
    I have a few questions that I need to get confirmed, I think I got most of it right from reading all the posts in this forum were there is a lot of information.

    What I want to do is to import a Chrysler T&C limited 2005 from the US to BC, this car in Vancouver cost on an average 36K + tax that make it just pass 41K !

    1. I did check the car in the Transport Canada's List of Vehicles Admissible from the United States and it is ok.

    2.I did check to get a recall clearance letter and that should be ok.

    3.How about the bumpers regarding the 8km/h are they sertified the same way in the US or do they have to be changed.

    4. the car is modern so daytime running light and child theeter is ok.

    5. And then to the cost, I understand that there is no sale tax in any state as long as the car is not fully licensed in the state, temperary is ok.
    the question is how to get the temperary licenceplate??

    6.so then there will be the car price + the fee for the aircondition 100+ somthing and the fee for overweight the same 100+ , and the fee for riv 209$ and on the top of this the tax of 7+7 % ??
    Does this mean that a car listed/sold for 26000$us would be mine to drve fully licensed in BC for approx 30K us(34100C$)???

    If everything I have been checking is correct this should be right, or is there somthing important that I'm missing here???? this means a saving up to 5K minus the travel/transport.

    anybody that have an idea about how right or wrong I would be about this??

    best regards
    Ove :confuse: :surprise: :confuse:
  • jayp3jayp3 Posts: 1
    hi.. I am wondering how to drive my new car from florida to ontario and how all the taxes work? Can i get a temp permit in florida? or do i need a florida licence? Do i need to give the border 72hrs? notice prior to my arrival? Also where and when do i pay the taxes? Can i put my ontario plates on and drive it home with in the 10days from purchase? any more info would be great. thanks.
  • geo9geo9 Posts: 739
    JAY...........This link will help:
    http://www.riv.ca/

    It has all the straight FACTS you will need to bring
    the car into Ontario.....................
  • Jayp3,

    I don't think www.riv.ca answers all your questions - it certainly doesn't answer the US part of your questions. So I'll try to share my findings here but would love to hear from others if I'm wrong (and why).

    1. Taxes:

    When you buy the car from a FL dealer, you won't have to pay state taxes. You only need to pay state taxes when you license the car in FL. (I'm not completely sure about this. Some states do allow you to defer the tax until licensing and others charge the taxes when the transaction is made at the dealer.)

    When you get to the Canadian border, you would pay GST and PST. (I'm not too sure about this either. Before, you would only pay GST at the border and would't pay PST until you licence your car in your province. But now CCRA has integrated GST and PST collection - I'm not sure if they bother to differentiate between cars and other goods.)

    2. Operating Permits:

    You will need temporary operating permits for each state (incl. FL) you drive through. You can buy the permits ahead of time or buy at the first MOV offices of each state.

    3. Title and Registration:

    My research shows that you have to title and register you new car in a US state before Canadian customs allow you to import, i.e. customs officers see the state title document as "proof of title". But after reading mlhoopr's and subahonda's posts, I'm starting to doubt myself. They seemed to imply that the dealer's sales receipts were sufficient for their cars to enter RIV/Canada.

    I haven't had a chance to verify this but plan to do so (at a RIV designated border office). You could do so and we can compare notes.

    If you still have to title and license the car in a US state, there could be three problems. First one is state tax - you might have to pay state tax which is not refundable. Second one is residency requirement - you have to show that you are registering the car in the right state, the state you have legal residency status - a job, school, etc. Some states don't have state tax - New Hampshire, Montana, Oregon, Alaska, Delaware. Some states don't have residency requirement. So far I've only found it's "true" for both of the above in Alaska. The third is time - in some states (such as Oregon) you need to wait for 45 days before the title document can be mailed to you.

    But if you don't have to title the car in FL, non of the above will a problem. So I'd recommend you check with the border about what "title document" really means first.

    4.`Insurance:

    You should be able to buy insurance (called "binder" something) in Ontario before heading out to FL. But you probably won't be able to use your license place legally. Some state will even require you to show insurance coverage by a US/State insurer before they can title the car. So again, I'd check the title requirement first before determining insurance requirement.

    5. Notice:

    The 72hr notice is what you have to give to the US customs - not the Canadian customs. This is for "exporting" the car from the US. I have no idea why this has to be done and what the consequences will be if this is not done. Canadian customs probably don't require anything from the US customs before they admit your car into Canada. So even if you do want to be clean with the US customs, why can't you just import the car, make sure all RIV requirements are taken are of and you won't have to "re-export" from Canada, before completing the "export" formalities with the US customs?

    Hope this helps. And please share your research results or importing experience back with us - I'm planning to import a Volvo later this year.

    Good luck!
  • dougb10dougb10 Burlington, Ontario, CanadaPosts: 185
    Did this some years ago and helped my 80 year old Dad bring a 2 year old Cadillac from Birmingham, Alabama into Ontario.
    Bought the Caddy from a Cadillac dealer in Alabama.
    Paid no sales tax.
    Had all the bill of sale documents.
    Drove the car with Alabama plates to Canadian customs.
    Paid GST and $100 air conditioning tax.
    Had to pay a small amount of duty based on the value of the car.Used the bill of sale to calculate this. They check the price against their own guide. If you try to bring in a $20,000 car and have documents that say you paid only $8,000, you are in for a pile of trouble...be honest and you find it pretty easy...we spent less than 30 minutes at the border.
    Registered the car in Ontario...paid the Ontario sales tax, had the safety certificate done, and put Ontario plates on it.
    When all was said and done, I think he saved about three grand over buying a similar car in Canada. But he was adamant that he wanted a car "with no salt on it!".
    Good luck in your efforts.

    Doug
  • Doug,

    Thanks so much for sharing the info. Just wondering if you could confirm/provide some more details for us:

    1. Did you use a temp Alabama plate given to you by the dealer at the time of sale? Or did you get your own license plate from Alabama Department of Motor Vehicle?

    2a. At the border, did you use the bill of sale as the "title document" which documents not only the ownership info but also any liens agaisnt it. I don't think the bill of sale can serve this purpose sufficiently.

    2b. If you did title and register the car on your own, did you or your old man have any residency status in Alabama? What document did you have to produce in order to get the registration?

    3. What temp operating permit and insurance did you use to travel from Alabama to Ontario? Or did you risk with insufficient coverage/licensing for the short period of time?

    4. Did you notify the US customs and completed the US export formalities?

    5. Did you buy the car in your own name or did your old man go with you? Was the car later registered in Ontario in your father's name? Was there a transfer from yourself to your father when you registered the car in Ontario? Besides the GST and other RIV fees, did you have to pay only the 7% PST, or both the 7% PST for registering the car first and the 7% social services tax for the ownership transfer?

    Thanks a lot for your help
  • dougb10dougb10 Burlington, Ontario, CanadaPosts: 185
    Tonytan1999....this took place in the early 90's, so some regulations may well have changed. My Dad was 80 years old, and decided on his own to buy a used Cadillac in Birmingham ("no salt") Alabama. He was going to fly down from Toronto and bring it back himself. Naturally, the family were not too keen on him doing this on his own and were wary that he could get conned into buying something with major problems. So...I assumed the "big protector" role and went along with him. A major father-son "bonding" event that I will never forget. He had that Cadillac for ten years before he passed away at 90....it was his pride and joy.
    1. We bought the car from the major Cadillac dealer in Birmingham...we phoned ahead and told them what we were looking for...they even offered to pick us up at the airport. The car we bought had Alabama plates on it. We left them on and didn't take them off until we screwed on the Ontario plates once we got back to Ontario. (the Alabama plates now adorn the inside of the outhouse at the cottage up North!)

    2.The bill of sale from the dealership had all the necessary stuff saying who owned the car.

    2b. We had no residency in Alabama....Dad just had his own residency and`license information.

    3.Dad got some kind of letter from his own insurance company in Ontario showing the Cadillac was covered for the journey home from Alabama.

    4.I don't recall anything being done at the U.S. customs. We told them we had bought the car in Alabama and were bringing into Canada where we lived. They just waved us on through to the Canadian side...this could be VERY different now though, so you had better check thoroughly.

    5. The car was always in my Dad's name.
    We had to pay 7% GST at the Canadian border and 8% Provincial Sales tax when we got our license plates in Ontario.

    We did this deal in January...drove home through a huge snowstorm...a very long two day drive. The guys at the Cadillac dealership were concerned about us enough that they even phoned home to Dad's home in Ontario to see if we made it OK...pretty classy! They also had a great sense of humour....told us that his car "had never been driven up a hill or against the wind"!

    Do your homework before you go....a few phone calls to customs should clarify things and avoid hassles.

    Doug
  • plesomeplesome Posts: 3
    Does anyone know the procedure for buying a new vehicle from Michigan and exporting it to Canada without paying the Michigan sales tax? I am interested in purchasing a new Acura or Honda but was told I would have to pay the Michigan sales tax unless the dealer delivered the car to the border? Does anyone have experience with this and can comment? Are there any differences between Michigan and New York with respect to state sales tax?

    Also, if the car is delivered by the dealer to the border, where will I get the temporary permit to drive the vehicle on the roads in Canada? Is this given to me at the border when I pay the Canadian taxes and appropriate registration fees? I am concerned if they deliver the vehicle that I will not receive the appropriate permit to drive the vehicle to my own ministry of transportation office to get my new license plates.

    Finally, while according to the Cdn government information there doesn't appear to be a problem in importing the MDX or Pilot, does anyone know any specifics about what modification would be required?

    Thanking you in advance for any advice,

    Paul
  • geo9geo9 Posts: 739
    http://www.riv.ca.com/ has a list of the approved US
    vehicles that can be imported into Canada along with
    other info you need...............

    BTW: You shouldn't have to pay Mich. sales tax because
    you are not registering it there but in Canada.....
  • plesomeplesome Posts: 3
    Thank you for your reply,

    I went to the RIV website and all it says is that all Honda/Acura vehicles can be imported. I assume I can call RIZ or Canadian Tire and find out the specifics.

    I am concerned about the Michigan sales tax, from the code:
    8-4.9 When going to Canada or Another Country. If the purchaser is taking delivery of the vehicle in Michigan and transporting in to Canada or another country, 6% Michigan sales tax is due. If the vehicle is being delivered by the dealer or dealer’s representative outside of the State of Michigan, sales tax is not due. (See Sections 8-5.10 and 8-5.11 and Chapter 3, section 3-9 for more information)

    I am concerned if I truck the vehicle across, are there any issues with the agent showing up at either border with my purchased vehicle. I know I would accompany them, but this may become more complicated. Could I get a dealer's plate and then drive it to Canada this way myself? Has anyone gone through this experience?

    plesome
  • geo9geo9 Posts: 739
    From you post it seems to assume if you are registering
    the vehicle in Mich. you would have to pay sales tax.
    It don't work that way in NY !

    Call Mich. DMV direct and ask................

    Ask about a temp. plate too or use a dealer plate.
  • socala4socala4 Posts: 2,427
    Firstly, let me qualify my comments by pointing out that while I have researched this subject (I was also looking at potentially exporting a US car into Canada), I don't have personal experience with it, so my comments are based upon my conversations with RIV and other research, not first-hand knowledge.

    That being said, to get the car across the border, you will need to first have US customs verify that the car has not been stolen, etc. before allowing it to cross. (This is why you need to fax the paperwork a few days in advance of your crossing, so that US officials can run the appropriate checks.) Canadian customs will not let you import the car unless you present this paperwork from US officials.

    Re: taking delivery in Ontario or elsewhere in Canada, I would guess -- and this is just a guess -- that it would be difficult to find a dealer who would actually deliver the car to Canada, because the dealership would probably require export licenses, etc.. But rather than worry about it, you could simply ask each dealer whether they can export the car across the border for you, and find out for yourself how easy or difficult this might be.

    Not sure if this would work, but to avoid the tax, I'd research the possibility of taking delivery in another nearby state, such as Ohio or Indiana, to see if you can avoid the Michigan sales tax. I would research the DMV websites of these other states to see what their rules are re: registration, sales tax rules for cars not being registered in that state, etc. as a possible loophole that might help you to solve your tax problem. But whether this will work, I don't know.
  • socala4socala4 Posts: 2,427
    Each state makes its own laws re: sales taxes. Michigan's laws might be very different from New York's, and you should research the laws of each state seperately to see how this could affect your vehicle purchase.
  • botabota Posts: 2
    Hi,
    When you finally sort things out, could you post your experience. I am also thinking about doing the same but in few months.

    regards,
  • maubreymaubrey Posts: 2
    I am also looking to purchase a new vehicle in the States and bring it across the border. I know the process itself is really quite simple as I just completed it for a new travel trailer I just bought in January of this year.
    For a travel trailer (which is classified as a vehicle the same as a car),

    When you cross the border you pay the GST and a fee of about $209 (regardless of the value of the vehicle)and fill out a form 1. You will need a form from the mfg. stating there are no outstanding recalls on the vehicle.

    Once the vehicle is in Canada you bring it to an inspection station (all Canadian Tires, no cost). They will check for compliance with Canadian standards.

    A few weeks later you will receive from RIV a letter and a sticker for the vehicle.

    You can now register the vehicle and pay the PST.

    Easy and thats it .

    The only difference that I know of for a motor vehicle is that you have to fax the American Customs 3 days before exporting the vehicle. (who knows why?)

    My question which I have read conflicting information on is:

    Can I buy a new car from an American dealer who knows that I am a Canadian. I will have to tell him in order to avoid paying the state sales tax. All exports are sales tax exempt. I DID NOT have to pay sales tax on my travel trailer which I bought from a company in Ohio.

    Does anybody have a difinative answer or know where I can get it . I tried calling a couple of American dealers and they said they would look into it but have not gotten back to me.

    If I get this information and if it is positive and I do buy the vehicle I want, I will make a concerted effort to post all my experiences here. Believe me, importing the trailer was a breeze and I saved about $9,5000 plus the GST and the PST I would have paid on the difference. It was well worth the effort.

    Thanks

    Mike
  • If you're reading this you're probably already burdened with too much information, well aware of the potential savings, but confounded in procedure and now constipated in the decision.
    You may have been told that what you are proposing is the acquisition of a “grey-market” vehicle - it is not. Refer to the CBSA website for definition of grey market and you will find that the proposition conforms with the intent of the free trade pact (NAFTA) and is perfectly lawful. To date however, North American dealers (NADA and CADA) have successfully lobbied manufacturers to impose burdens upon consumers and even dealers who venture into this area. If you have not done it, you have to do some reading and consulting first. Reference the following websites and call them, as well as contact your potential U.S. dealer.

    • http://www.riv.ca/english/html/how_to_import.html (*When referring to the list of admissible vehicles be cognizant that vans and SUV’s are classified as multi-purpose passenger vehicles)
    • http://www.cbsa-asfc.gc.ca/E/pub/cp/rc4140/rc4140-05e.pdf
    • http://www.cbsa-asfc.gc.ca/E/pub/cm/d19-12-1/d19-12-1-01-e.html#legislation
    • http://www.cbp.gov/xp/cgov/export/export_docs/motor_vehicle.xml

    In summary you must:

    1. Determine the warranty ramifications - consult with the Canadian arm of your vehicle manufacturer and outline your scenario (they may chose not to honor it for the first six months or more however I believe Safety recalls have to be honored)
    2. Notify U.S. Customs and Border Protection at your port of export and for that matter Canada Border Services Agency (Customs) at your port of import one week in advance of your purchase
    3. To save yourself aggravation and qualify for the greatest discount insist on full purchase from the U.S. dealer (no U.S. financing required). If you need and qualify for a new car loan arrange it in Canada. Disclose what you are intending to do to your bank or trust. Confirm the logistics involved in wiring the funds (EFT) from your bank to it’s correspondent bank in the U.S. You want to be sure that everything is in order prior to handing over your funds to the U.S. Dealer.
    4. Pay RIV fee ($209 all Provinces except Quebec which is $224) - Arrange CTC inspection within 45 days of import
    5. Have the U.S. dealer provide a Letter of Compliance or recall clearance letter. It states whether or not there are any outstanding safety defects on your vehicle and recalled by the manufacturer. The recall letter must come from either the manufacturers head office or authorized American dealer (not re-seller). Contact the U.S. head office of the manufacturer ask if the dealer can issue the same. RIV will only accept a letter is on company letterhead with the manufacturers logo. U.S. dealerships must include address as well as the manager's name and signature. The VIN (17 digit vehicle identification number) must be included in the letter.
    6. You will find that generally for an admissible new vehicle to pass inspection, we need:
    a. Daytime running lights (DRL’s) [Not an issue with current model GM’s. DRL’s should be programmable by any reputable service department of most manufacturers. Arrange it with your US Dealer service dept prior to purchase]
    b. Metric Speedometer [Metric may already exist on most speedometers. If not, changing it at a Canadian dealer may only cost about $300.00 (they have to input the correct odometer reading pursuant to the Excise Act). Another alternative to pass inspection is “stickers” on your speedometer - Contact the RIV to confirm].
    7. Pay GST (7%) and appropriate PST or HST in Atlantic Canada at the port of entry - reference the Bank of Canada for the foreign exchange rate on the date of sale.
    8. There is no duty if your vehicle originated in Canada or the United States.
    9. There will be $100 excise tax if the vehicle has air conditioning
    10. If they are particularly diligent, you may have to pay CBSA addtionally imposed excise taxes. If your passenger car weighs more than 2,007 kilograms or 4,425 pounds. Multi-purpose vehicles (vans and SUV’s) and station wagons have a greater weight allowance, 2268 kilograms or 5000 lbs. This fee is scaled in increments of 15 Kg but the most you may pay would be about $300 +/- for something as big as a Chevrolet Suburban.

    Besides those listed above, the websites listed below may be particularly helpful prior to making any future decisions. I just happened across the NAATA.org website today. I have not used their service but understand their mandate is to facilitate the purchase and sale of cross-border vehicles. I question the altruistic intent of a not-for-profit association of vehicle dealers that import and export vehicles across international borders because it seems counter-intuitive to the establishment of an enterprise. The NAATA website does however appear geared to collecting annual fees for membership to full service (typically dealers... I wonder if any Candian dealer exist who will help?) and associates (typically vehicle industry organizations, i.e. freight, customs brokers, and money service businesses for foreign exchange...). So, other than collection membership fees (which are clearly stated), NAATA does not appear to have a hidden agenda. As previously mentioned, I have not used their services and do not know if there is fee to consumer but presume there is not. I anticipate the advantage to NAATA “members” (dealers and broker)is derived in potential business from consumers like you and I, which generates an ethical debate about the true intent of a not-for-profit association. Mission statement aside, my research has uncovered that Brian Osler, the president of NAATA is a lawyer in Ontario, steeped in cross-border vehicle issues and appears to advocate the intent of NAFTA.

    • http://www.naata.org/
    • http://www.naata.org/pdfs/Rip_Off_USA.pdf
    • http://www.automotivedigest.com/view_art.asp?articlesID=6682
    • http://www.canadiandriver.com/news/020206-1.htm
    • http://www.canadiandriver.com/news/020214-1.htm
    • http://www.lsuc.on.ca/public/a/member-directory/

    Good luck,
    Canucknuckled
  • plesomeplesome Posts: 3
    What a great posting, thank you.

    FYI - for those living in southern Ontario, I spoke with a dealer in New York state that said they are not required to collect state taxes. All they would do is charge us a fee for a thirty day temporary vehicle permit which we could use to drive to Ontario and register the vehicle. Michigan has different rules so it appears to be better to purchase from New York State.

    Thanks again,

    plesome
  • socala4socala4 Posts: 2,427
    1. Determine the warranty ramifications - consult with the Canadian arm of your vehicle manufacturer and outline your scenario (they may chose not to honor it for the first six months or more however I believe Safety recalls have to be honored)
    2. Notify U.S. Customs and Border Protection at your port of export and for that matter Canada Border Services Agency (Customs) at your port of import one week in advance of your purchase
    3. To save yourself aggravation and qualify for the greatest discount insist on full purchase from the U.S. dealer (no U.S. financing required). If you need and qualify for a new car loan arrange it in Canada. Disclose what you are intending to do to your bank or trust. Confirm the logistics involved in wiring the funds (EFT) from your bank to it’s correspondent bank in the U.S. You want to be sure that everything is in order prior to handing over your funds to the U.S. Dealer.
    4. Pay RIV fee ($209 all Provinces except Quebec which is $224) - Arrange CTC inspection within 45 days of import
    5. Have the U.S. dealer provide a Letter of Compliance or recall clearance letter. It states whether or not there are any outstanding safety defects on your vehicle and recalled by the manufacturer. The recall letter must come from either the manufacturers head office or authorized American dealer (not re-seller). Contact the U.S. head office of the manufacturer ask if the dealer can issue the same. RIV will only accept a letter is on company letterhead with the manufacturers logo. U.S. dealerships must include address as well as the manager's name and signature. The VIN (17 digit vehicle identification number) must be included in the letter.
    6. You will find that generally for an admissible new vehicle to pass inspection, we need:
    a. Daytime running lights (DRL’s) [Not an issue with current model GM’s. DRL’s should be programmable by any reputable service department of most manufacturers. Arrange it with your US Dealer service dept prior to purchase]
    b. Metric Speedometer [Metric may already exist on most speedometers. If not, changing it at a Canadian dealer may only cost about $300.00 (they have to input the correct odometer reading pursuant to the Excise Act). Another alternative to pass inspection is “stickers” on your speedometer - Contact the RIV to confirm].
    7. Pay GST (7%) and appropriate PST or HST in Atlantic Canada at the port of entry - reference the Bank of Canada for the foreign exchange rate on the date of sale.
    8. There is no duty if your vehicle originated in Canada or the United States.
    9. There will be $100 excise tax if the vehicle has air conditioning
    10. If they are particularly diligent, you may have to pay CBSA addtionally imposed excise taxes. If your passenger car weighs more than 2,007 kilograms or 4,425 pounds. Multi-purpose vehicles (vans and SUV’s) and station wagons have a greater weight allowance, 2268 kilograms or 5000 lbs. This fee is scaled in increments of 15 Kg but the most you may pay would be about $300 +/- for something as big as a Chevrolet Suburban.


    That's pretty much what my research turned up as well. I'll just add a few points:

    -Most cars make the RIV list, but not all, so do be sure that yours is on it. While most cars make it, some would be very costly or next to impossible to get into compliance.

    -Tethers for child seats can be an issue for some cars. Again, most cars will make the grade, but some won't. The RIV list should help with this.

    -Notifying the US port of exit by fax is essential, but a few day's notice may be sufficient. I'd double check this on your own, don't take my word for it.

    -The metric speedometer shouldn't be issue for most cars, because US speedometers almost always have metric markings as a secondary marking, which seem to be good enough.

    -For the odometer, a sticker that makes it clear that the reading is in miles and that provides a math conversion formula (if I'm not mistaken, this is provided by Canadian Tire) might be enough, but double check this. If you have a digital odometer that can flipped between standard and metric, then obviously you need not do anything.

    -You might also require bilingual stickers for your airbags, safety equipment, etc. If the warning labels on the passenger visor are not in French, a bilingual sticker is required. (Sorry, I don't have more details about where you get the conversion stickers, or what happens if you don't.)

    Again, the real equipment issues seem to be focused on DRL's, child tethers, the odometer sticker and bilingual markings. The fax to US customs is a must, as is the "recall letter". Warranties can also be an issue, depending upon the brand, so be careful. Changing gauge clusters should not be necessary for virtually any car.

    (If any of this is mistaken, feel free to correct it.)
  • botabota Posts: 2
    Hi,

    I was told by a Michigan GM dealer that you cannot buy a "New & Untitled" vehicle in the U.S. and import it into Canada. But you can bring a "Used" 2006 with 500 miles on it for example from the U.S. into Canada.

    Also somebody else told me that the GM warranty on a new imported vehicle would kick in after 6 months

    regards,
  • Bota,

    In response to your last point first, I have received the same response from Canadian GM dealers. I suggest you:
    1. Email GM Corp. USA (customer service), outline your (Canadian resident) intent to purchase a GM vehicle from a U.S. GM dealer and lawfully import it into Canada. Specifically ask about the warranty ramifications. If you happen to obtain a direct and clear answer, save it. I anticipate it will be worded in such a way that they will refer you to one of their many Canadian dealers in your area…. Should that be the case, reply to them and ask if you (Canadian) are restrained from commerce with U.S. division of their retailers /dealers. Ask if their warranty contracts are transferable between Canada and the U.S. I believe the contracts (GM and GM Canada) mirror each other, so why would the location of vehicle operation void contract, Alaska’s environment is every bit as hostile as any Canadian environment.
    2. Email GM Canada (customer service) outlining the same scenario and again save the response. It may take a couple of requests to obtain adequate responses.
    3. You may want to go so far as contacting the state finance department and Better Business Bureau to ascertain if you are prohibited from new product purchase.
    4. Communicate through a recordable medium like the Internet or facsimile rather than telephone since “getting it in writing” is always better than taking someone’s word if you expect the issue to be revisited. I suppose if you anticipate an adversarial relationship at the onset, you should ask yourself why you want to do business with that manufacturer / dealer.
    5. At risk of sounding like an advocate for it, the NAATA website mentioned in my previous posting helps to explain this. (X-ref: http://www.naata.org/new files/faqs.html).

    In response to your first point, the dealer is wrong. I have heard similar examples however the pre-owned vehicle had to be “titled” six months prior or have at least 7,500 Miles (16,100 Km) to ensure warranty coverage.
    I suppose as a merchant, the dealer may or may not sell any of his/her products to whoever he/she chooses, provided he/she does not contravene the law (municipal, state/province, federal) and does not engage in discriminatory practices. This is an area of civil law involving chattel (moveable property) and contracts. What does the retailer care who the purchaser is? It should be a mutual agreement wherein you offer to provide him/her consideration (negotiated full purchase price) and he/she provides the product c/w warranty and you assume title or ownership. Provided the dealership is not being used by the new car purchaser as a conduit to launder proceeds of crime and proper protocols are followed, transfer of title or ownership could be easily arranged. Unless of course, he/she fears sanction or exclusion from GM Corp., which I believe would be contrary to the antitrust legislation (Competition Act in Canada or Sherman Act in U.S.A.).
    BTW. A colleague (Canadian resident) recently attempted to negotiate the purchase a new Mercedes in the US because Daimler Chrysler Canada dealers were not willing to match or even approach US purchase prices (factoring USD/ CAD exchange). His experience was that no Daimler Chrysler US dealers would sell “new” to him so he gave up and resorted to the purchase a nearly-new Mercedes in the US.

    FYI, I bring to your attention a recent article dated March 20, 2006, in Automotive News, regarding the antitrust settlement by Toyota Corp. Link to:
    • http://www.autonews.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20060320/SUB/60317060/1003/BR- EAKING&refsect=BREAKING
    Antitrust law in the U.S. is legislated in the Sherman Act. Link to:
    • http://www.usdoj.gov/atr/foia/divisionmanual/ch2.htm
    I am not aware of any similar class action lawsuits in Canada at this time but believe such violations may be in contravention of the Competition Act. Link to:
    • http://laws.justice.gc.ca/en/C-34/index.html

    Good Luck and keep us posted,
    Canucknuckled

    Socala4, thanks for filling in the voids, especially the bilingual (French/English) airbag warning stickers for the visor. I guess RIV can provide more details if necessary.

    Readers may choose to stop here, the following are just ramblings.

    For several reasons automakers have severed their operations into national divisions (i.e. GM Canada and GM USA) and therefore practices of one division may not necessarily binding in another. From a consumers perspective, fluctuating currency exchange rates between nations (Canada and US in this case), globalization, and rapid growth in emergence of a medium (Internet) where reliable information is accessible and readily exchanged has dramatically impacted the automobile industry. Although there are significant national economic repercussions (jobs, government subsidies, ect…) our respective federal governments are signatories to a pact that allows cross-border vehicle shopping, provided there is adherence to the respective federal, state/province, and municipal statutes. Thus, oligopolies like the automobile industry may not tacitly collude to restrict distribution to consumers based upon geographic origin. In my opinion such a practice would be construed as discriminatory and contrary to antitrust legislation. Consumers are also aware that manufacturers and distributors are lawfully afforded regional incentive programs that may favor certain locales in an effort to “stabilize the market” or balance inventory.
    In fairness, manufacturers (automakers) and their distributors (dealers) are engaged in enterprise to enjoy the benefit of profits (margin) for themselves and their stockholders. Auto producers wholesale their products to dealer retailers who provide the product/service to us, the consumer/ client at a negotiated price. Increased product demand may diminish supply and warrant a justified price increase in a capitalist free market economy, so be it. What these multi-national corporations and their distributors must understand is that with the proliferation of the internet (information sharing), savvy consumers are also participating in the global economy and trans-border movement of goods and services is no longer their exclusive domain.
    Consumers are willing to go the extra mile (or Kilometer in Canada) to enjoy fair deal. Don’t construe this as a militant stance as I know I’d pay a few extra bucks ($1500.00 CAD is my limit) to contribute to my local economy, defeat the hassle and inconvenience of an extra-territorial purchase but I resent “gouging” at my expense. Surely dealers and manufacturers understand that they are dealing with more educated consumer who wants to pay the lowest possible price and expect reasonably trouble free product function.
    Canucknucled
  • Sorry to anyone who has tried to link to the automotivenews.com website mentioned in my April 2, posting and prompted to a subscriber page. It happened to be an example of the dated antitrust debate that saw the import of Canadian vehicles into the U.S. Our "Smart Shopper" forum is identical, except it involves the import of U.S. vehicles into Canada. Note that Toyota have addressed the issues of blacklisting and warranty concerns. Also note the Toyota spokesperson's remark about competitive conditions in local markets. What local markets must understand is that dealers must engage in fair pricing policies consistent with other markets in this global economy.

    Thankfully enough I happened to copy the article. Here it is:

    Toyota settles suit alleging collusion on imports

    Mark Rechtin | | Automotive News / March 20, 2006 - 6:00 am

    LOS ANGELES -- Toyota paid $35 million to settle allegations that it colluded with other major automakers to keep gray-market vehicles from being exported from Canada to the United States.

    The lawsuit continues against five other automakers: General Motors, Ford Motor Co., DaimlerChrysler AG, American Honda Motor Co. Inc. and Nissan North America Inc.

    Under the Toyota settlement, agreed to in late February, Toyota Motor Sales U.S.A. Inc. admits no wrongdoing in the class-action lawsuit. The suit, filed in 2003 on behalf of a group of consumers, alleges automakers violated the Sherman Antitrust Act by keeping U.S. customers from taking advantage of lower vehicle prices in Canada.

    The suit seeks unspecified billions of dollars in damages for U.S. consumers who bought a vehicle of any brand after Jan. 1, 2001. By restricting Canadian imports, automakers fixed U.S. market retail prices at an unfairly high level, the suit alleges.

    The suit alleges that automakers colluded to blacklist dealers who imported Canadian-market vehicles for resale.

    Automakers also agreed to decline consumer warranty claims against those vehicles, the suit alleges.

    The action mirrors action this decade by the European Union to enforce price uniformity among member countries.

    The National Automobile Dealers Association and Canadian Automobile Dealers Association also are defendants.

    Paying a settlement without admitting guilt was a better use of its legal team's time and money than going to court, says Toyota spokesman Xavier Dominicis.

    Toyota honored warranties on Canadian vehicles imported to the United States, Dominicis says. And Toyota never blacklisted any dealer or owner who imported a Canadian-market vehicle, he says.

    "Other automakers may have had more restrictive policies, but our actions were different from other automakers," Dominicis says. "We will continue to price our vehicles based on competitive conditions in local markets."

    Spokespersons for GM, Ford, NADA and the Canadian Automobile Dealers Association declined to comment on the litigation, other than to say it is without merit. They declined to comment on Toyota's settlement.

    In a 2005 motion for summary judgment, denied by the U.S. District Court in Maine that is hearing the case, GM said it never met with other automakers to discuss how to handle the gray-market issue, thus making collusion impossible.

    The automaker also said its import-export policies have been independent and in place for decades.

    Canucknucled
  • andrew14andrew14 Posts: 1
    Hi everyone,

    I have read through the information regarding importing cars in Canada from the USA. Does the same hold true for used cars?

    I have a 1994 Jeep Cheorkee sport. I got a great deal on it here about a year ago. I have lived in the US for over a year and am now going back to Canada to do my Ph.D and would like more info on the costs/administrative hastles i would have to go through to bring my Jeep into Ontario.

    IN all, how much would it cost me to bring the car over the border? I paid $2, 495USD originally for the car. How much would it cost to pass the inspection (aproximately?).

    In toher words. Is it worth my hastle to go through all of this? Or should i just sell here and biy a new car in Canada?

    I was hoping to cross the border, pay the duties etc. but not register the car for about a year or so until i have enough money to pey for what may be needed and for insurance. Is this possible? or do i have to register the car and get everythign done within those aloted 45 days?

    Any help would be great!

    Thanks!
  • ennnorakennnorak Posts: 9
    I am fed up with our political leaders who raise all sorts of expectations re free trade in automobiles and then erect plenty of red tape and non-tariff barriers to make it difficult to do business. The Big 3 are no help either. They should treat Canada and the U.S. as a sigle market and not have separate corporate headquarters and marketing policies.

    Before you buy a car in Canada, check the domestic price in the country of origin and the exchange rate. The difference is what I call the rip-off factor. In order to make sure you are comparing apples to apples, ensure your comparison does not include government levies such as excise taxes and value added taxes as these vary from country to country.
  • Is the GST amount payable calculated on the original purchase price or on a more current value, say a blue-book value for example?
  • Andrew14,
    Go to the following:
    http://www.cbsa-asfc.gc.ca/E/pub/cp/rc4140/rc4140-05e.pdf
    http://www.cbsa-asfc.gc.ca/E/pub/cp/rc4105/rc4105-e.html
    http://www.cbsa-asfc.gc.ca/E/pub/cp/rc4151/rc4151-e.html
    http://www.riv.ca/english/html/how_to_import.html
    http://www.mto.gov.on.ca/english/dandv/vehicle/rgoutcan.htm
    http://www.driveclean.com/
    You're circumstances are unique so better to email RIV, CBSA, and MTO.
    Not aware of vehicle inspection in Ontario other than Ontario's Driveclean (emissions)program and of course the mandatory inspection at a local Canadian Tire for RIV.
    Insurance is compulsory and huge fine ($10,000) for driving without (Ontario Compulsory Automobile Insurance Act).
    If you are a non-resident of Canada you may be able to get away with not registering your vehicle however I would refer to the Ontario Highway Traffic Act to be sure.
    Good Luck
  • Refer to page 9 and 10 of the following:
    http://www.cbsa-asfc.gc.ca/E/pub/cp/rc4140/rc4140-05e.pdf
    Also refer to subsection 220.07 of the Excise Tax Act
    http://laws.justice.gc.ca/en/e-15/271763.html
    Hope it helps
  • If a Canadian resident purchases new vehicle in the US here is what I have learned about some automakers warranties.
    Honda Canada will not provide warranty coverage at any time. :mad: Suppose if you had relatives/friends in the US you could always register the warranty at the US address. ;)
    GM will not honour the warranty until 6 months or 12,000 Km. :confuse:
    Toyota will honour their warranty North American wide. :)
  • swkswk Posts: 1
    I am Canadian citizen and have been lived in US for 5 years with legal visa. Now I plan to move from US back to Alberta, Canada within two months. I am thinking to buy Toyota Sequoia in US to save money before I move.

    1) Will US Toyota warranty be honored in Canada?
    2) Can this car meet to Canada emission regulation?
    3) What type of tax do I have to pay in US and Canada?
    4) How I can arrange for trip permits while transporting back to Alberta, Canada?
    5) What else should I know?

    Thanks,

    SW
  • socala4socala4 Posts: 2,427
    All of your questions are answered immediately above you in the last few preceding posts.
  • agathonagathon Posts: 1
    I am trying to figure out a way to set up a transaction, i already found the car i'm looking for. Ive talked to the owner and he seems legit. I was going to fly down and drive it back myself, but the flights have gotten rather pricey, so i am looking in to a rail company to transport it for me. Now my question is how do i do the financial part of the transaction when im not there in person to get the bill of sale done or the title transfer? Does any one have any suggestions as to a secure method so i dont get taken? And does anyone know about local tax in IL that i could be charged?

    Dion
  • Dion,
    If you have done so, consult with the following:
    http://www.riv.ca/english/html/how_to_import.html
    http://www.cbsa-asfc.gc.ca/E/pub/cp/rc4140/README.html
    and click on "rc4140-05e.pdf"
    If the vehicle passed those steps, then:
    Caveat emptor
    Essentially the seller wants your funds and you want his/her goods. You do not know each other well enough to establish a level of trust and therefore need a third party (broker or lawyer from that state, at your expense) who will serve both parties in the transaction. Think it through from both sides of the transaction and play-out the worst possible scenarios (i.e. seller a scammer or buyer a scammer).
    Research automobile brokers familiar with US /Canada transactions and only use one with a historically good reputation (bonded). Go to:
    http://www.movecars.com/states/illinois.htm
    http://www.movecars.com/toc/find/index.htm#canada-us
    http://www.searail.ca/contact.php
    Email questions to them regarding your situation.
    If that doesn't work for you, and at risk of sounding like an advocate for the following, go to:
    http://www.naata.org/
    email: [email protected]
    and they may be able to connect you to a broker in that area.
    OR
    If you choose to complete the deal yourself:
    An electronically scanned contract that is signed or signed facsimile (fax) should suffice.
    You may wish to seek legal counsel and setup a contract that has stipulative clauses about COD payment.
    Use EBay Auto to educate yourself about car sales and guaranteed transaction systems like PayPal.
    On a private or dealer sale you should be tax exempt since you are not registering the vehicle in state. Even if taxes are insisted you may be eligible for a tax rebate upon proof of export or registration out of state. Research Illinois Department of motor vehicle (DMV)law.
    Go to:
    http://www.cyberdriveillinois.com/departments/vehicles/title_registration/home.h- tml
    Post your results.
  • filionfilion Posts: 7
    I am trying to find out if a private citizen like myself (not a dealer or importer) is permitted to buy and then import a new or used 2006 Subaru B9 Tribeca. I am not to sure about the laws because when we came home from Lake Placid the customs officer asked what we had to declare and I told him I had 3 cases of beer. They took away 2. So if I also had a $35,000 suv will they also take that away? Any help on this matter will be greatly appreciated
    Thanks
    Big D
  • geo9geo9 Posts: 739
    Why didn't you just "declare" the extra 2 cases and pay
    the couple of bucks duty on the American side?

    The customs officer must of been in a pissy mood !

    When we head over the border to go to casino and return
    with over the limit booze/butts I always pay duty.

    Remember the limit is/was 1 case beer, 200 cigs, 1.5
    ltr. liquor per person duty free............
  • Big D,
    No, only if you keep importing that watery 'merican beer. Just kid'n, I'll trade a John Labatt Classic for a Sam Adams any day. Most of us in this forum share your thriftiness when state-side as some retailers in Canada are really hosing us.
    Thankfully the vehicle you're looking for is manufatured in Lafayette, Indiana and therefore duty free.
    First, go to:
    http://www.subaru.com/owners/warranty/index.jsp
    http://www.subaru.ca/interface/Subaru02/WebPage.asp?WebPageID=5257&WebSiteID=282-
    and email Suburu Canada customer service, so you have record of their response.
    If that was positive, then go to:
    http://www.cbsa-asfc.gc.ca/E/pub/cp/rc4140/README.html
    (and seeing as you are filion click on either the english or french PDF file)then,
    http://www.riv.ca/english/html/how_to_import.html
    And finally go to:
    http://www.cbsa-asfc.gc.ca/E/pub/cp/rc4044/rc4044-e.html#P203_25788
    CBSA may only withold items pending payment of required duty, taxes, and/or penalty. In your case (no pun intended) you should have been afforded the opportunity to pay penalty (which is usually so expensive that it is worth it to forfeit the alcohol/beer). Who cares, la belle province has some of the finest micro-breweries in North America and after tasting some of Quebec's fine blonde ale I understand why Canada's "border beer nazis" poured that Rolling Rock down the drain.
  • The "limit" you refer to is an a duty "exemption" only and applies after 48 hrs and the importer meets the age requirements at the port of entry of the Province / territory. Generally upon return to Canada after:
    24 hr abroad - $50 CAD exemption (Cannot include alcoholic beverages or tobacco in that total);
    48 hr abroad - $200 CAD exemption (May include alcohol and tobacco);
    7 days and more abroad - $750 (May include alcohol and tobacco).
    Tobbaco and alcohol amounts are limited and the exemptions are not cummulative (i.e. cannot combine 48 hr and 7 day)
  • geo9geo9 Posts: 739
    Yea, I should of posted that part.............

    I just declare and pay the duty as my visits are less
    than 24 hours.
  • Kirstie_HKirstie_H Posts: 11,104
    Wow! Thanks for providing such extensive information, canucknuckled!

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    Share your vehicle reviews

  • kirstie_h,
    Not a problem. I apologize for slightly straying off the forum topic in my most recent post.
    Our favourable CAD/USD exchange rate makes import of a vehicle from the US even more appealing. Canadian arms of the major manufacturers and dealers have not lowered prices or raised incentives to purchase on the Canadian side of the border. The major detractor though is the warranty ramifications.
  • cosmosus1cosmosus1 Posts: 2
    I see a lot of discussion on use cars and some on specific new cars in terms of exporting from US to Canada. If possible, can someone give me some guidance in terms of importing a brand new Toyota 4-Runner from the US into Canada. I plan to purchase it new in on June 24 and drive it from Houston Texas to Calgary Alberta. It appears that a number of issues may prevent importation from occurring:
    1) - valid Canadian/US drivers license (I am a Canadian living in Qatar and only have an international driving license and Qatari license both issued in Qatar
    2) - insurance on the vehicle - how can this be obtained?
    3) - several forms that must be registered with the US and Canadian Customs agents 72 hours (?) prior to importation. Where are these forms obtained?
    4) - restrictions on importation of new vehicles - seems like some discussion has raised this as a potential pitfall
    5) - cost - about how much would it cost and who do you pay? approximately US$3000 on a US$35,000 vehicle?
    6) - boarder crossing - can this be done at any crossing from the US into Canada?
    7) - anything else?

    Thanks in advance!!

    Cosmo
  • carlover10carlover10 Posts: 13
    Hi,

    I'm considering buying a new car in US and importing it to Canada. I know some people here have given excellent details on the logistics involved in the import.

    A couple of things are still not clear to me:
    Could anyone throw some light?

    One issue is if I buy the vehicle in the states, obviously I won't be registering it there. So, how do I drive it to Canada without a valid vehicle license (registration)? Is there a way to get a temporary license plate in the states? Or is it legal to drive without it to Canada?

    Another one warranty. The vehicle I'm considering on buying (Acura/Honda) loses its warranty as soon as I register it in Canada. (becomes a grey market vehicle). I contacted a couple of third party companies providing replacement warranties. Anyone has any experience in this? Are they any good ? (Yes, the price difference of this vehicle (between US and CAN) is so high that I'm even willing to take a chance on forgoing the whole warranty.)

    Your help is greatly appreciated.

    Thanks

    CarLover
  • Hi Cosmo,

    I am importing a new Toyota from Billings to Calgary, AB - around the same time as you. I would be interested in comparing notes with you.

    Is there an easy way for us to take this discussion offline between ourselves? If we figure anything dramatic out, we can post results here, but there are some specifics that I would rather not have in a public forum.

    SpinalTap
  • filionfilion Posts: 7
    Well I drove my new Tribeca home to Montreal from the Subaru dealer in New York and this was easy. Importing a car from the U.S. is easy all i have left to do is the inspection.
    6 steps
    1> Check the RIV list to see if your vehicle is admisable http://www.riv.ca/
    2> Buy a vehicle
    3>Send the title to U.S. customs were you will cross 72hrs before
    4>Pick up your Vehicle go to U.S. customs export your vehicle, get the title back from U.S. customs.
    5> Go to Canada customs to import your vehicle pay gst, $200+ riv package and drive home.
    6> Wait for your riv package to arrive in the mail for the inspection.

    I am now waiting for my riv package, the dealer in NY put a 30 day tag on it so i'm driving around with that until i get my own plates.

    If you are a smart shopper the savings can be huge with the cnd dollar so strong.
    In my case the best price a MTL Subaru dealer sell me a tribeca was $54,000 after i totalled everything my cost on the same Tribeca will be $36,000cnd, $18,000 difference for 1 day of lost work.
    And Subaru Canada will honor the Warrantee
  • cosmosus1cosmosus1 Posts: 2
    I am a novice at this and am only considering it since I will be in Houston Texas for a week and am in the market for a new vehicle (and my friend suggested importing as an option as a few of his friends have already done it and saved a bundle). It is a long drive and perhaps it is better to fly to a city closer to the boarder.....Looks like we may get some good advice on this chat board.

    Cosmo
    [email protected]
  • shellnekovshellnekov Posts: 4
    Was wondering if you paid the 6.1 % duty, as this Subaru's is probably made in Japan. Correct? Thinking of importing a Porsche 911 but the added 6.1% is kinda scaring me off. Also, another question is how you got title to US Customs 72 hrs in advance I would like to fly in, pay for, and drive directly to border. Will I be held back??
  • filionfilion Posts: 7
    The Tribeca is built in the US so no 6.1%
    The Dealer fedex me the title after i wired him the money then i drove it(title) down to the border (US customs) and they gave me an export date which was 3 days later. you can also mail the title to Us customs with 2 copies front and back(mandatory) and then export 72hrs after they received it.
    There is no getting around it you can not buy a car in the U.S. and drive it home the same day.
    Good luck with the porsche
  • emmdeeemmdee Posts: 1
    I am looking at bringing a new 06 Pilot from Washington state back to Vancouver but am concerned about the warranty issue. From a previous post do we know if it is as easy as registering the warranty with a family member's address somewhere in the US? (ie Sister in North Carolina). Have you heard of this actually working? There was another comment from someone about the warranty still being valid in the US if brought back down to a US dealership. Can anyone comment further on that point?
    Thanks!
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