2015 Mustang Ecoboost Manual Transmission Noise

bbrown4ubbrown4u Member Posts: 2
edited April 2016 in Ford
Under higher torque load there is a vibration/rattle noise with my hand on the gearshift lever. Loudest between first and second then slightly less between 2nd and 3rd. Less noise with low rpm's but still there. Dealer says normal to the year and transmission. Drove another with same equipment and did not occur. How do I deal with this?

Answers

  • Mr_ShiftrightMr_Shiftright Sonoma, CaliforniaMember Posts: 64,482
    Sounds like you got the brush off. The dealer should at least investigate the problem.

    Now let me ask you something and please don't take offense--this is only in the interest of investigation---is there any chance you are short-shifting, or lugging? Short-shift would be jumping from 1st to 3rd in certain situations. Lugging of course is being in too high a gear, or in other words letting the RPMs drop below say 2000 when on an upgrade--things like that.
  • bbrown4ubbrown4u Member Posts: 2
    Appreciate your point and no offense but neither of those shifting issues apply. Ive driven lots of manual tranny cars and not in drag mode but, however, very distinct vibration noise in heavier launch mode from stop with RPM not exceeding 4500 and not under 3000k. Most noticeable with hand resting on the shift knob between 1-2 and 2-3 shifts (not unusual method). thanks
  • Mr_ShiftrightMr_Shiftright Sonoma, CaliforniaMember Posts: 64,482
    Well I haven't taken one of those gearshifts apart but generally most are designed some type of anti-rattle specification, whether it be a boot, or a rubber insulater between gearshift and transmission, or an anti-rattle spring. I don't have a manual for this car so I can't see a blow up to possibly identify a source.
  • thecardoc3thecardoc3 Member Posts: 5,535
    Why is your hand on the shift lever when you are not shifting gears? The shifter design is integral to the transmission so being able to feel vibrations under certain conditions does not in itself suggest that something is wrong.

    If there are no other symptoms with your hand not resting on the shifter then the dealer may be correct. BTW, resting your hand on the shifter will accelerate shift fork and blocker ring wear inside the transmission, so try and get out of that habit.
  • steverstever Guest Posts: 52,454
    Is that still the case @thecardoc3? I used to hear that all the time but a year or so ago someone said it was an urban legend. Sorry, no idea what link I saw that at.
  • thecardoc3thecardoc3 Member Posts: 5,535
    Yes it is still the case. It's not as bad as it was a few years back but it is still an issue. The shifter has mechanical advantage over the shift fork. That four inches of throw at the shifter only moves the fork about three quarters of an inch, so it doesn't take much to get the fork to ride one side of the ring.

    When we get a vehicle in with a difficult to engage complaint, or jumps out of gear it's quite common to find that the fork has worn on just one side. The detents in the shift linkage do a good job of positioning the fork in an unloaded position when the shifter is at rest, but resting your hand on the shifter can put enough pressure against the detent the fork remains in contact with the ring.
  • steverstever Guest Posts: 52,454
    Thanks. A quick net survey shows almost as many opinions as in the oil wars. Also interesting is that some owner's manuals say not to rest your hand on the shifter while other manuals are silent about it (not that I skimmed any manuals).

    I broke my habit with my CJ-5 back in the mid 70s.

    In the late 80s I got "bad" about shifting my Tercel without the clutch a lot (after breaking my left leg and winding up in a cast for 3 weeks). It survived.
  • thecardoc3thecardoc3 Member Posts: 5,535
    In the late 80s I got "bad" about shifting my Tercel without the clutch a lot (after breaking my left leg and winding up in a cast for 3 weeks). It survived.

    That reminds me of a few years back I had hurt my left knee and was gimping around pretty bad. A customer dropped off a heavily modified Mustang Shelby GT and it was all I could do to grit through the pain and push the clutch pedal. It was the next year before I finally got to take him and it for a real ride.
  • steverstever Guest Posts: 52,454
    You just needed a broomstick. :) (achievement.org)
  • Mr_ShiftrightMr_Shiftright Sonoma, CaliforniaMember Posts: 64,482
    stever said:

    Thanks. A quick net survey shows almost as many opinions as in the oil wars. Also interesting is that some owner's manuals say not to rest your hand on the shifter while other manuals are silent about it (not that I skimmed any manuals).

    I broke my habit with my CJ-5 back in the mid 70s.

    In the late 80s I got "bad" about shifting my Tercel without the clutch a lot (after breaking my left leg and winding up in a cast for 3 weeks). It survived.

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    I suspect it would take you a trip to the moon and back before you'd wear out a transmission by resting your hand on the gearshift.

    You know, if the guy's brand new Mustang rattles, then it rattles. It's not supposed to rattle.
  • thecardoc3thecardoc3 Member Posts: 5,535
    This doesn't go into detail about the synchronizers beyond the brass blocker rings, but it does show how the ring gear has limited travel. Once the shift has been completed it needs to be at rest. Any pressure on the shifter will hold the fork against the side of the shift ring which will first wipe lubricant off of the surfaces, and then allow them to make direct contact, and that results in wear.

    "You know, if the guy's brand new Mustang rattles, then it rattles. It's not supposed to rattle."

    Do you know what will happen if you try to fix something that isn't broken? First, you will fail to fix it. Second, by even attempting to fix it you have now convinced the owner that not only is he/she correct and it is broken, you are unable to fix it.
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