Toyota Tacoma vs Honda Ridgeline

buffalonickelbuffalonickel Member Posts: 113
Those of you interested in Frontier vs. Tacoma may want to take a look at Honda's debut pickup truck.

 

http://autoshow.msn.com/as/article.aspx?xml=Honda&shw=autosho- w2005&src=autoshow2005&GT1=5967

 

Ridgeline is powered by a 3.5-liter VTEC V6 engine that produces 255 horsepower and 252 lb-ft of torque, mated to a standard 5-speed automatic transmission. Unlike traditional full-size pickup trucks, the Ridgeline does not have a cargo bed that is separate from the passenger cab; the bed and cab are integrated. So I guess this is an "Explorer-looking" vehicle from Japan.

 

One thing for sure: Honda engineers their work very well.

 

Has anyone seen these at the auto shows as yet? How about a test drive? You can look for these in dealerships in March--only 30 days away.

 

What do you guys think of no mention of a standard transmission?

 

B
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Comments

  • rshollandrsholland Member Posts: 19,788
    are inevitable, but until the Ridgeline actually hits the streets, are now pretty much just speculation.

     

    I do think the Ridgeline will cause all the midsize (and full-size) truckmakers many hours of lost sleep, however.

     

    Bob
  • 5553543255535432 Member Posts: 150
    Have any of you guys seen the Ridgeline in person (maybe in the carshow).My hands are itching to get into a truck but I've passed on the Tacoma x-runner because of the absence of sideairbags even as an option.The Tacoma was plain looking in the pictures but looks great live.Can any of you say the same thing for the Ri8dgeline?
  • rshollandrsholland Member Posts: 19,788
    Have any of you guys seen the Ridgeline in person (maybe in the carshow).

     

    Yep. I crawled all over it at the Detroit show. This vehicle will be HOT! I'm convinced of it. I was there during one of the industry days, those are folks who in some fashion work in the auto industry, or some related industry. Those people were all over the Ridgeline like bees at a bee hive. It was hard to get seat time, but yes, I was able to spend some time in it.

     

    Bob
  • gearhead1gearhead1 Member Posts: 408
    Well, It's the ugliest truck I've seen, and I liked the Element, but it does have some cool features like the in bed trunk, navigation, all wheel drive and some kind of locking rear diff.

     

    Manual trans is also unavailable on the Ridgeline which will be a deal breaker for some.

     

    I don't think I can get past the ugliness. The Tacoma is a beauty compared to the Ridgeline, and I'm sure the Taco is much more capable off road.
  • atlgaxtatlgaxt Member Posts: 501
    This topic should have been broadened a little bit. I am interested in getting a crew cab pickup, and right now for me, the Frontier is also in the running along with the Tacoma and Ridgeline.
  • rshollandrsholland Member Posts: 19,788
    I agree. I should include all the mid-size trucks.

     

    Bob
  • buffalonickelbuffalonickel Member Posts: 113
    Not sure why you couldn't get the side airbags, but I had them installed in a Tacoma 4x4 Double-cab long bed. They are still building it, but the dealer called me 2 weeks to ask if I wanted to add it in.

     

    B
  • gatrhumpygatrhumpy Member Posts: 126
    Wait....this is almost too good...You liked the Element, and you thought the Ridgeline was UGLY? WOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOW. I bet you think the Assteck is the best looking SUV out there, huh?

     

    Man, I'd hate to see what you consider ugly...
  • gearhead1gearhead1 Member Posts: 408
    Hey man, the Element is Hummeresque in it's way. It looks like a modern safari vehicle or baby Hummer. It's beauty is in it's practicality. That being said, I'm buying a Tacoma Sport package because it's a true work of automotive art, and the oil filter is actually accessible.....and the Ridgeline is still butt ugly, as is the Asstek. So there. :)
  • 5553543255535432 Member Posts: 150
    I did a research and I haven't yet seen what the heck is an ASSTEK.Is that a cross between a donkey, horse and steak?

    I was so close to buying a Tacoma X-runner, but the Ridgeline was worth the wait, saw one in Northeast Honda in MD. I was discouraged in the pictures but was impress with in in person.The Tacoma looks like a pretty metrosexual boy next to the ruggedly handsome Ridgeline.

     

    P.S

    The Toyota always garners top honors in the absence of a Honda contender. The Sienna was top dog for a while till the redesigned Odyssey entered the fray. The Truck of the year award was a joke, coz the Tacoma got it in the absence of the Ridgeline.Enjoy your rigged award coz it's the last time Toyota sees it.By the way the Pilot is on a roll, it joined CD's 5 best trucks 3 yrs in a row.I'ts amazing how Honda, a tiny company steals the thunder from Toyota, a company so big with Biliion dollar pockets.I won't be surprise if the Ridgeline eliminates your pretty Tacoma in 5 best trucks by CD.
  • gearhead1gearhead1 Member Posts: 408
    The Asstek is the Pontiac Aztek. Well, I look forward to seeing the Ridgeline in person. I wasn't that impressed with the Tacoma styling until I saw it in person. Still hard to believe it will overcome the pics I've seen. We'll see.
  • rshollandrsholland Member Posts: 19,788
    that the Ridgeline is not for those who have to "impress" others with their ride. It's for the buyer who knows what he/she needs in a pickup. It's not huge. It doesn't reek of "machismo." It is, however, one of the most useful and practical new vehicles ever to come down the pike. And, it will cause many automaker executives in Detroit and Toyko many hours of lost sleep.

     

    I couldn't agree more.

     

    Bob
  • explorerx4explorerx4 Central CTMember Posts: 17,476
    toyota has worked for years on their reputation in trucks. i don't think honda is going to topple them too easily. i just think you have to give toyota some credit.
    2020 Ford Explorer XLT
  • rshollandrsholland Member Posts: 19,788
    There's nothing terribly wrong with the Tacoma, but it's a case of just more of the same, of what's gone before. Been there. Done that.

     

    The new Ridgeline injects some new and creative thinking into a class of vehicle that has been sorely lacking in that department.

     

    Bob
  • explorerx4explorerx4 Central CTMember Posts: 17,476
    i view a pickup as a very flexible platform. how does the 'ridge improve upon that? i still stick to my opinion that they answered a question nobody asked. do you or have you ever owned a pickup? i'm just curious, not trying to cause a conflict. your opinion is valid, i'm just interested on what you base it on.
    2020 Ford Explorer XLT
  • gearhead1gearhead1 Member Posts: 408
    Well, I was going to buy a 05 Taco sports package, but now after spending a significant amount of time on the Ridgeline site, I'm going to wait at least till I've seen the Ridgeline in person. Honda has come out ahead of the Tacoma at least in features. It appears to be a city all wheel drive pickup, but then Honda throws a serious offroad feature like a locking rear diff on it as a standard feature on all Ridgelines, which toyota puts only on their offroad package, though the Ridgeline has a inch less clearance. The 4 wheel drive kicks in automatically which I think is more appealing than a partime system which could be damaged on dry pavement if left engaged accidently.

     

    Their tow package is also standard on all Ridgelines. It's available only as a feature in Toyotas 3,000 dollar offroad or sports package

     

    Hondas new bed design beats Tacoma all to hell with their great inbed trunk and a tail gate that opens in 2 directions. No more climbing in to your bed over your tail gate. This is the most innovative thing I've seen in a pickup bed, and the spare is actually accessible easily.

     

    Leather interior, navigation, moonroof are available. These features are absent on the tacoma. What's up Toyota!? Are we in the new Millenium are not? Get with the program.

     

    Ridgeline has a independent 4 wheel suspension delivering a true Sedan ride on a truck!

     

    The only innovative I see on the 05 Taco is the new composite bed, of which I've seen a pic of one cracked (probably due to owner retardation, but it wouldn't have happened if it were steel). they also have available a 120 volt 400watt receptacle in the bed which is kind of cool, though I'm not sure what I would use it for.

     

    Just a little thing, but the Rideline has a locking gas door, unlike the free access to all gas cap on the Taco. Yeah, I'm paranoid. Just don't piss any kids off in your nieghborhood if you have a Taco.

     

    All this said I'm still leaning toward the Taco, but they better cut me one hell of a deal Mr. Toyota dealer, because it won't take much to nudge me over to the Ridgeline.
  • explorerx4explorerx4 Central CTMember Posts: 17,476
    gearhead1, looks like the 'ridge will work for you. hope you enjoy whatever you buy. based on your comments, i'm not sure why you are buying a pickup type vehicle. whatever your reasons are, they are ok with me, i just am not sure what they are.
    2020 Ford Explorer XLT
  • gearhead1gearhead1 Member Posts: 408
    I don't think I mentioned my use requirements, but if you need to haul, the Rideline will allow 4x8 buiding material to lie flat in the bed unlike the Taco.

     

    I've driven a Toyota 2wd pickup for the last 14 years and I love it. Never had a problem. It's that relationship that compells me to still lean towards Toyota, and the new Tacos look great.

     

    I now have needs that require hauling and off road access more than ever.
  • rshollandrsholland Member Posts: 19,788
    do you or have you ever owned a pickup? i'm just curious, not trying to cause a conflict. your opinion is valid, i'm just interested on what you base it on.

     

    Yes. I used to own a '86 F-150 4x4. I had it for roughly 10 years. I don't currently own a pickup, but I follow them very closely. I've also examined the Ridgeline up close, both at Detroit, and again yesterday at Philly.

     

    The rear 2-way tailgate and bed trunk are ingenious. Those features are only possible thanks to the IRS (again, long overdue on pickups) on the Ridgeline. I think you need to examine one at your local car show, or wait for them to show up at Honda dealers next month. I think once you see it firsthand, you'll see what I'm saying. This vehicle is going to rewrite the game plan for family-oriented pickups. It's not perfect. There are several features missing that I wish it had; but it is mighty close to being perfect.

     

    Bob
  • jfigueroa1jfigueroa1 Member Posts: 209
    It look like a nice vehicle, all of these goodies cool stuff. But all of those things sure will come at a price. I am seeing reports of the vehicle starting at around 27,000 remember the taco 4 dr rwd start at around 22,000.

    I think the Honda Ridgeline and the Toyota Tundra should be the one going head to head.

    greetings

    fig.

    ps. I bough a taco 2wd a/t sport pack .for 24,200 will be in next week.
  • rshollandrsholland Member Posts: 19,788
    Need to compare apples-to-apples; the Ridgeline should to be compared to a 4x4, not a 2WD.

     

    Bob
  • xwesxxwesx Fairbanks, AlaskaMember Posts: 15,863
    I agree with you wholeheartedly on many points you have illustrated in this topic (and others), Bob. While I hope to not be in the market for a new vehicle to replace my '96 Subaru OB for another 3 years, I have seriously been leaning toward a small CC pickup to be both my Subaru and my '69 C20. I want to retire the '69 as a work truck one of these years to restore it (only needs some touch up) and then not use it for in-bed payload; hopefully just some parades & periodic towing.

     

    The ridgeline will definitely be on my short list come shopping time. With a small maxi-dump trailer, I should be able to use it admirably as a family car and also haul the equivalent with the trailer as my '69 does in its bed alone. On the rare occasion that I do need 3-8 ton towing, I can break out ol' yeller to supplement.

     

    I have already removed the Tacoma from that list, at least for the time being (we'll see again in 3 yrs).
    2018 Subaru Crosstrek, 2014 Audi Q7 TDI, 2013 Subaru Forester, 1969 Chevrolet C20, 1969 Ford Econoline 100, 1976 Ford F250
  • explorerx4explorerx4 Central CTMember Posts: 17,476
    bob, my only point is that the bed area is over designed. i am not trying to discourage anyone from buying one.
    2020 Ford Explorer XLT
  • rshollandrsholland Member Posts: 19,788
    my only point is that the bed area is over designed.

     

    And more power to Honda for doing so, and may they reap the rewards (aka sales & profits) that all those overdesigned features are bound to bring.

     

    Bob
  • once_for_allonce_for_all Member Posts: 1,640
    looked very nice. There was a 4 x 2 xtra cab with a sport package (large wheels, slightly lowered, etc.). Very nice looking truck drawing huge crowds.

     

    So, I climbed into the front seat, and liked just about everything until I looked out the windshield. The rear view mirrow was actually below my eye level (me being 6'3") and created a huge blind spot for me. Wondering why, I noticed that Toyota had created head room by carving out a chunk of the head liner. Hmmm. Not good.

     

    Loved the oil filter location on the V-6 and nifty drain setup with easy access.

     

    Hoping Honda has things sized better for me.

     

    John
  • midnightsunmidnightsun Member Posts: 92
    Pretty face or ugly face, who cares.

     

    For the apparently few buyers of 4WD trucks who use it, or even know what it does, there is no 4Lo range in the Ridgeline, according to a magazine review I just read. If you actually plan to use it for 4-wheeling rather than just carting family and friends to the ski slopes and malls, you'd better check this out for yourself.

     

    If lack of 4Lo does not matter, you're comparing it to the wrong type of vehicle (Tacoma still has this). An all-wheel-drive station wagon or van would be more analogous (lots of passenger and cargo room, not much 4-wheeling ability). Or if you occasionally need an open bed, there's the GM SUV with the sliding rear roof.
  • rshollandrsholland Member Posts: 19,788
    I agree. That's one of my few complaints about the Ridgeline; no low-range. :(

     

    Bob
  • buffalonickelbuffalonickel Member Posts: 113
  • buffalonickelbuffalonickel Member Posts: 113
    The Ridgeline boasts having the first pickup with a trunk! I could see many uses here. For one: you may not need a tool box. The draw back is that if you have a load of heavy tools or lumber or manure, you will have to remove the load before you can get to the trunk. The "door opening" reminds me of the old El Camino. That was a car that was a truck also and it had quite a long bed.

     

    All-in-all you will have 255 ponies pulling it and it is capable of towing 5,000 pounds.

     

    As neat as this may be, I ordered a Tacoma and hope to take delivery sometime before I die.

     

    B
  • 1honda1honda Member Posts: 1
    I currently work at a Honda dealership, and you might want to do a little research, the honda ridgeline as with the pilot both have a four low option. However it is not called that, it is called VTM for variable torque management and is standard on all ridgelines and pilots. For your safety once engaged, if you exceed the recommended speed for the four low option it will automatically disengage to prevent damage to the engine.
  • rshollandrsholland Member Posts: 19,788
    I currently work at a Honda dealership, and you might want to do a little research, the honda ridgeline as with the pilot both have a four low option.

    WRONG!

    That is not a "Low Range." All that is, is the ability to lock the vehicle in either 1st or 2nd gear—which is not low range.

    Vehicles with a with a low-range transfer case have a full set of gears x 2. So if the Ridgeline had a true low range transfer case, it would have a total of 10 gears, not 5.

    Bob
  • varmintvarmint Member Posts: 6,326
    Bob is right. VTM-4 locks the rear diff so that power is constantly being send to the rear wheels (up to a certain speed), but it has nothing to do with the gearing of the transmission.
  • gpomettogpometto Member Posts: 2
    My dying Grand Cherokee was capable but is not functional for my current needs. My requirements are for a pick-up capable of: 1) hauling firewood, dirt, stone, furniture, etc.; 2) 4WD or AWD to get me up the mountain dirt trail thru mud, snow, ice (but no need for off-roading); 3) small enough to fit thru the 8' wide mile-long "driveway" along the cliff; 4) smooth, comfortable ride [middle-aged man with bad back]; 5) relatively quiet ride [mild hearing loss]; 6) "good" mpg [miles from gas station; 7) "small" turning circle [tiny turn-around at cliff top]; 8) comfortable back seat for "haulin'" in-laws. I'm considering Dakota Quad 4WD; Tacoma Double Cab 4WD; & Ridgeline Crew Cab AWD. Anybody know what's best?
  • centralcalcentralcal Member Posts: 215
    The ridgeline sounds like a good fit, I didn't wait because I didn't like the looks of it. I ruled out Dakota because of the history of Dodge and poor resale. That left Tacoma and Frontier (which you didn't mention). I heavily researched both, test drove both (many times) and I thought the Frontier was the clear winner. All three (Taco, Frontier and Ridgeline) are all newly designed/remodeled. There are going to be growing pains. With a completely new platform, I would be a little more hesitant to go with the Honda. The Taco is having some major growing pains (maybe they will get ironed out by later this year). I have had zero problems with the Frontier, but they have only been out for a couple of months. Just my thoughts.
  • gpomettogpometto Member Posts: 2
    Thanks for responding. I read that around town and on the highway the Frontier is comfortable but a bit harsh, that the heavy-duty frame is ultra-stiff which makes for a choppy ride. Do you own the Nismo or one of the others, e.g. LE?
  • atlgaxtatlgaxt Member Posts: 501
    Stiff frame is a good thing, which helps your ride. Stiff suspension setting make a vehicle ride hard. Are you saying the Frontier has a stiff suspension?

    You do not want a loose floppy frame.
  • midnightsunmidnightsun Member Posts: 92
    This is why you need to demo for yourself: ride quality is extremely subjective.

    I test drove non-NISMO and NISMO Frontiers. I thought the non-NISMO (SE) had a very plush ride, predictable yet ultrasmooth. I actually preferred the firmer NISMO ride and ordered that truck instead for that and other reasons.

    These trucks have long wheelbases, so they do not have a choppy ride at all (again, this is my subjective rating). You want choppy, try riding a bobtailed 4WD such as a Sami or Wrangler.
  • centralcalcentralcal Member Posts: 215
    I have an LE. I think the ride is excellent (and I just got out of a car and I am very picky). I do think the Taco ride is a little more refined if you do not get the TRD package, but the Frontier is very nice and much quieter. The Taco sport seats are very comfortable, but I thought SR5 seats were not (and you can not adjust them). Also, the visibility wasn't very good. I feel very confident taking the Frontier through about anything (I am sure the Taco is the same). I would take them both out several times on a test drive, you will find one you like better.
  • woofwoof Member Posts: 27
    From what I can see, the Ridgeline is an interesting vehicle and would meet my needs for my next truck. Yet, recent experiences with my '01 and '02 Accords were the worst of any cars I've owned. The '01 was a lemon; Honda's customer service from both the dealer and the factory was terrible, actually torturous. (The '02 was not a lemon but was developing unexpected problems, including transmission and brakes, so I quickly dumped it after 20k miles and less than one year.) My Toyotas have been great; any issues were handled with care by the dealer often with a follow-up from the factory people. Based on experience, this is a BIG plus for Toyota. Even though Toyota's warranty is better from the start, they take care of customers much better in and out of warranty. My vote goes to Toyota.
  • boxskyboxsky Member Posts: 7
    That's unusually for Honda. I had a 95 Civic and my wife a 94 with no problems. I had over 125,000 miles on me with only a CV boot needing to be replaced and my wife had a water pump go around 85,000 miles.
    Later on my wife and mother both bought a RAV4 and both had small problems with them. My mother also got a Camry and had several problems with fit/finish. Honda, Toy & Nissan still are better then the big 3. It's all preferences.
  • buffalonickelbuffalonickel Member Posts: 113
    Saw a commercial on TV on the Ridgeline. Somehow it doesn't look like a truck. It looks like it doesn't know what it wants to be. But they state it is built by Honda and I guess that explains it.

    I saw it at the car show and I wasn't impressed. However, I would like to test drive it. Maybe that is where all the hoopla starts!

    B
  • captjohncaptjohn Member Posts: 9
    I chuckled over the similarities between the two of us, right down to the 99 Jeep GC that I owned that gave me a back ache from the lousy seats. I dumped it after only 1-1/2 years, Are you sure thats not the source of your back problems? I also owned a Dakota for 16 years, so I tried out the new 05. I liked how it drove, but was disappointed that the 5-sp auto is only available with the V8. Plus I'm fearful of the Chrysler engines. I've dealt with two many head gasket problems on Chrysler Engines with Iron blocks/Aluminum Heads (both V6 & 4). Read my first drive impressions of the Ridgeline vs. the Tacoma in the Ridgline forum. I'm leaning toward the Tacoma over the Ridgeline due to the interior fit and finish, but the Honda has some compelling features that might sway you, like the trunk in the bed.
  • robertblaizerobertblaize Member Posts: 5
    I have much the same requirements. I ruled out the Dodge after a test drive - Not great ride, poor resale and rather spartan interior. (Even though the dealer offered a $5000 discount.) The V8 gets slightly better milage than the V6 because the V8 had a 5speed auto vs the 4 speed auto for the v6.
    I found a Tacoma quad cab with the SR5 #8 package and it had everything I (we) want. I got $1500 off MSRP. and bought it after a 5 mile test drive. My trade in was a Toyota Highlander and the ride is definately firmer, but it is the most comfortable truck I've ever driven. 6500 lbs towing and I said SOLD. I've now had it long enough to find any hidden defects - None found except there is a typo in the owners manual that says the horn will chirp when using the remote to lock/unlock. I am totaly satisfied with the Tacoma, except I had to buy a Bed cover from a another source - $200 Extang TonoIII.
    The Honda? It will not be discounted and I'm not sure I want their first effort at making an american-ized pickup.
  • buffalonickelbuffalonickel Member Posts: 113
    Hey, where are you guys?
    Who just bought a Ridgeline and what do you think? BTW how long is that bed?

    I would be curious about MPG, acceleration, options, cost, and maybe why you bought one.

    B
  • 6spdtl6spdtl Member Posts: 30
    I just love people discussing about their 4wd low when none of them has used it in their life for what it is for! It just goes on to prove how gullible and dumb (though large and important to a car company)the average truck buyer IS. The existance of 4wd low is for going down steep inclines (read rubicon type), it lets the vehicle maintain a crawling speed to avoid losing control or your brakes. You never need it for anything more, if you have used it for something else HERE YOUR SIGN: HEY BUBBA MAKE SURE YOU PUT THA TRUCK ON LOW TO GO UP THER HILL OR TO PULL OUT OF THER SNOW BANK. SURE GOMER HUH HUH. Just like 90% of truck owners never put more than a couple of pieces of plywood in the back or ever take their truck further than a gravel road less then 1% ever use low range and we can see by the comments around here even those that use it don't know what its really for!!!! Hondas real problem selling this truck will not be because it is not by far the best vehicle of its type ever made, but because the target consumer is just too dumb to even understand it. Its like trying to explain a toilet to a indian from the amazon that has never even used a latrine:)
  • midnightsunmidnightsun Member Posts: 92
    I'm surprised you don't know about the enormous head gasket "campaign" involving Toyota V6 engines from late 1989 into the early Tacomas. While they appear to have solved the problem, it just goes to show that any make/model can have big problems. (I owned, still own, one of the trucks that had to get the head gasket replaced, and I can assure you that it was not a cheap fix--some people got it fixed free, some people paid 100%, most people ended up paying a good chunk of the cost.) I suppose this is better than the Ford V6 head gasket disaster, though. Ford apparently refused to acknowledge the problem.

    Honda just made the news with recalls of Civics and Accords--the same two models that have earned praise for great quality and reliability. You just never know.
  • midnightsunmidnightsun Member Posts: 92
    I disagree. First gear in 4Lo is good for more than just descending on extremely steep grades. It goes UP extreme grades and surfaces very well also--better than first gear 4Hi does, with more control.

    Since it multiplies torque, there is no reason it be LIMITED to only descending uses. If that's all you use it for, that's your choice. There is absolutely no reason it can't be used for climbing and pulling purposes...any low-speed, high-torque situations. This is something many, many experienced 4-wheelers use, both up and down.
  • rshollandrsholland Member Posts: 19,788
    Yep. 4 Lo can be useful an any number of situations. It's like having additional (off-road) insurance for those rare occasions. I'd much rather have it—and never need it, than not have it—and need it.

    Bob
  • swannswann Member Posts: 3
    6spdtl, I'd like to introduce you to my friend "Bubba", so you may share with him your superior knowledge involving the intricacies of the four wheel drive systems, and how gullible and dumb a prospect he is. That being said, I spent some time with the ridgeline today. It is a well thought out vehicle from a function ability standpoint but, the exterior lines are too difficult for me to digest. The 255 horsepower is so-so, needs more TORQUE! Most vehicles in this class produce more torque than horsepower, which is needed for towing. Honda obviously didn't solicit any torque info from "Bubba".
  • 6spdtl6spdtl Member Posts: 30
    I rest my case, they dont even get it when its explained to them!!!!!
    Now lets get into torque, the ridgeline has been proven to tow a 5000 lbs trailer as well as an F150 with the optional 5.4 liter V8. I guess the ridgelines has 250 percherons while the f150 has 360 shetland ponies. Its not only how much torque an engine can deliver, its how that torque is put to the ground, furtheremore, once your out of the standstill HP becomes more important than torque. I guess most bubbas use their trucks for pulling stumps and that kind of duty since all that bountyfull torque is not creating any towing advantages. Sorry fellas, The ridgeline is as butch if not more than any truck in the midsize market and even shows the big boys a thing or two when it comes to true utility. And as stated before, the regular truck buyer wont get it since hedoesn't have the nogging to understand it. Bubba put in low so we can multiply the torque! sure gomer lets do that!!!! By the way here your sign!!!!
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