Howdy, Stranger!

It looks like you're new here. If you want to get involved, click one of these buttons!





Howdy, Stranger!

It looks like you're new here. If you want to get involved, click one of these buttons!

Have you recently bought/leased a new car online and requested a home delivery due to coronavirus? A reporter would like to speak to you; please reach out to [email protected] by 4/8 for more details.
Did you get a great deal? Let us know in the Values & Prices Paid section!
Meet your fellow owners in our Owners Clubs

Advice on buying a used Subaru Outback for $20,000 ($25,000 highest) lower price OK. Mileage?

muklukmukluk Posts: 38
edited April 2018 in Subaru
I have a 2002 Subaru with 206,000 miles but will eventually need to replace it (I'm the original owner). It will be sad to have to go from a manual to an automatic : (

Limited budget due to various issues (including that I also need to buy a used truck).

I am interested in a 2.5 for the fuel economy and like the nicer models (premium and limited) but could go without if need be.

With regard to amount of mileage on the vehicle what would be the best bang for the buck? I know there are a lot of other factors at play such as how well maintained the vehicle is, accident hx etc. I'm just wanting to know if it is a horribly bad idea to get one with 63,000 miles versus 30,000 miles. I know you can get a better price from a private party but I will need to finance some of the purchase price so will need to buy from a dealer. I typically drive about 10,000/year and would like to keep whatever I buy until it officially dies.
Here are some sample vehicles all listed on Car Max in my area (CA)


2015 2.5 limited 28,000 miles for $25,998
2016 2.5 premium 28,000 miles for $24,998
2013 2.5 limited 50,000 miles for $20,998
2013 2.5 limited 63,000 miles for $18,998
2013 2.5 limited 63,000 miles for $14,998

I have not gone to look at any vehicles-but probably should to get a sense of what I want. I probably won't want to buy until my current Subaru officially dies- unless I find a screaming good deal.

Any advice greatly appreciated.




Comments

  • steine13steine13 Posts: 2,759
    >> 2013 2.5 limited 50,000 miles for $20,998
    >> 2013 2.5 limited 63,000 miles for $18,998

    Depending on who does the counting, these cars are now six years old. For $20k??
    A new Limited stickers for $33. New Subarus are available for invoice, give or take a few bucks.

    I'm in rust-prone Michigan, and I just saw a car that was a "good deal" for a Subaru:
    A one-owner 2005 Outback with 181k miles for $3850. It sold in a few days.
    Point being, Subaru resale is strong at any age.

    I bought a new 2014 Outback Premium 6MT -- sticker $26+ IIRC -- drove it for two-and-a-half years and 24k miles, and sold it back to the dealer for $19 cash. They put it on the lot for $23 and flipped it in a week or so.

    To quote the philosopher and sports announcer Brockmire: "See if you can sense a pattern here."

    You still have a car. Start putting monthly payments aside and then buy a new Outback configured like you want. If you need a super long loan, do it and buy the extended warranty [manufacturer's warranty only]. Good luck!

    Oh and this:
    >> sad to have to go from a manual to an automatic : (

    Good riddance to the stick shift in my 2014. It was hard to drive smoothly, and had all the charm of a John Deere, ca. 1964.
  • muklukmukluk Posts: 38
    Maybe the prices are like that because I'm in CA?
  • steine13steine13 Posts: 2,759
    NEW prices are national.
    But used Subarus are expensive everywhere.
    Consider their tremendous growth over the past decade -- that alone assures that demand exceeds supply. They sell more than twice the cars they did before the Great Recession.

    I understand about setting a budget, but I don't get paying ~ $20 for a six-year-old car that will need significant maintenance now or soon, for which you have to pay while also making car payments.

    The first three to five years of a new car ought to be more or less 'free' -- oil & tires kinda stuff.
    Look, it's your money. Just try out these ideas and see how they fit.
  • kyfdxkyfdx Posts: 148,769
    Later model Subarus have weird computer controlled throttles (for emissions?) that make the manual transmission driving experience frustrating. I had a 2008 Impreza and my 14 yr old son asked me if I had forgotten how to drive a stick!

    I'm guessing the earlier models were better.

    So, at the end of my two year lease, when my then 16 yr old son was learning to drive? Didn't bother me so much when he killed it 17 times in a row, trying to make a left turn at a left turn only light. Not even after the cars had lined up 15 deep behind him, and the local cop pulled up along side, to make sure we were okay. ;)

    Did you get a good deal? Be sure to come back and share!

    Edmunds Moderator

  • muklukmukluk Posts: 38
    steine13 said:

    NEW prices are national.
    I understand about setting a budget, but I don't get paying ~ $20 for a six-year-old car that will need significant maintenance now or soon, for which you have to pay while also making car payments.
    The first three to five years of a new car ought to be more or less 'free' -- oil & tires kinda stuff.

    The first three years of a cars life are when the major depreciation occurs and when you are paying the most for insurance and registration

    What sort of significant repairs would you anticipate for a used 2013 or newer Outback with say 30,000 to 50,000 mileage that will likely not be driven more than 10,000 miles per year?

  • steine13steine13 Posts: 2,759
    >> The first three years of a cars life are when the major depreciation occurs
    That's clearly not the case for $30k cars that cost $20k 5 years later...like most Hondas, the depreciation curve is basically a straight line for the first ten, twelve years.

    Go to http://www.subaruoutback.org/forums/138-gen-5-2015-present/ for real-life insights into modern Subarus.

    It seems they're a decent long-term investment, and the CVTs appear pretty stout. Head gaskets are still an issue but not as bad as they used to be. They're good, not great, mechanically. They're also magic in the snow, no question. Good luck in your search.
  • muklukmukluk Posts: 38
    My criteria for a vehicle is that it needs to be all wheel drive (I live in CA but we get snow where I live and I also go skiing where they often get a lot of snow). Or camping with rough roads. And enough room inside for two bales of hay or 4 pallets or whatever else I need to transport. And I don't want worse gas mileage than I would get with an outback.
  • muklukmukluk Posts: 38
    I guess the subaru is due for a redesign in 2020. Maybe I should try to keep the old one going until the new 2020 comes out and then buy a new one? That is if the 2020 is a significant improvement over the prior major update.
Sign In or Register to comment.