Would This Be a Model A?

DigiKentDigiKent Member Posts: 9
edited July 16 in Ford
Picture taken about 1916



Thanks.
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Best Answers

  • texasestexases Member Posts: 9,697
    Accepted Answer
    No Model A at that time, looks like a Model T.
  • fintailfintail Member Posts: 53,937
    edited July 16 Accepted Answer
    Yes, a Model T, and kind of interesting. Plate indicates 1916, which matches some details, but I think the car was also modified. The car has 1916 style fenders, but 1917 style hood and modified looking radiator shell. 1917 was the year the car changed from a brass radiator to steel.

    1916:

    image

    1917:

    image

    I wonder if it was changed to look newer, or if someone wanted the prior style fenders.



Answers

  • DigiKentDigiKent Member Posts: 9
    Thanks
  • DigiKentDigiKent Member Posts: 9
    Interesting observation. Do you suppose Ford changed the hood and radiator shell to the new style late in the 1916 model year?
  • fintailfintail Member Posts: 53,937
    edited July 18
    That could be the case. In those days, changes didn't follow a strict model year schedule, rather, I think took place when designs were updated and parts became available, so there could be "in-between" cars. The owner could have also done it himself, maybe he got a deal on a late run 16 model and for a fair price, got the updated parts.

    I also notice the car in the old pic has a radiator shell that appears modified in the top section - this was common at the time, as although the Model T was a durable useful car, it was cheap, and eventually had an image as kind of an unrefined car, so people would try to disguise it - there were plenty of accessories to dress up these cars.
    DigiKent said:

    Interesting observation. Do you suppose Ford changed the hood and radiator shell to the new style late in the 1916 model year?

  • DigiKentDigiKent Member Posts: 9
    Despite whatever modifications were made, my great uncle is still having to add water to the radiator. I wonder if he had to carry it in the car in the metal bucket?
  • texasestexases Member Posts: 9,697

    Before antifreeze adding water was common.

  • fintailfintail Member Posts: 53,937
    I suspect old cooling systems were far from water/air tight, and needed frequent replenishment. Also a good chance of damaging components on the road quality of that era, probably wasn't uncommon to nurse along a small leak until a replacement part came along.
  • texasestexases Member Posts: 9,697
    As best I can tell, the first pressurized cooling systems were in the early '50s, so up until then any cooling system could boil out water that needed to be replaced, probably frequently in hot weather.
  • DigiKentDigiKent Member Posts: 9
    Good point. Thanks for the extra research!
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