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Forester - Headgasket Repair & Engine Rebuild

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Comments

  • rockmobilerockmobile Posts: 113

    Has the head gasket problem subsided or disappeared on the Outback for the years 2010 and newer models? I'm looking to buy a used one for any of those years, reason been is that I do not like the looks of the 2014 nor the CVTs.

  • once_for_allonce_for_all Posts: 1,640

    as much as it sounds like Subaru head gaskets are a general serious problem, it really isn't significant for 2003+ engines. Does it still occur? Sure. Any engine can suffer a head gasket failure. It is easy to get alarmed by reading posts and blogs, but that doesn't represent the thousands of cars that have no issues.

  • texasestexases Posts: 5,687

    The problem is still serious 2003+. Right now Consumer Reports shows 'Much Worse Than Average' for 'Engine, Major' for Foresters through 2007, with 'Worse Than Average' for 2008. The same is true for the Outback. This bums me out, I got a 2007 Forester expecting the problem had been fixed by then. Only now, with the closed-deck design, would I say the problem is fixed for sure.

  • rockmobilerockmobile Posts: 113
    edited January 7

    So I assume it's safe to get any Forester for the years 2010 and up. And hopefully the "closed-deck design" (dunno what that means) should have taken care of things. :) My first message also refers to the Forester, sorry about the mishap.

  • xwesxxwesx Fairbanks, AlaskaPosts: 8,677

    @rockmobile said: So I assume it's safe to get any Forester for the years 2010 and up.

    2011 is the start of the FB engine block's use in the Forester. So, if you want to ensure you're getting a car with the new block design, don't include 2010 in your search. :)

    2010 Subaru Forester, 2011 Ford Fiesta, 1969 Chevrolet C20 Pickup, 1969 Ford Econoline 100, 1976 Ford F250 Pickup, 1974 Ford Pinto Wagon
  • saedavesaedave Chicago, ILPosts: 685

    And 2014 is the first year for the XT turbo to have the new design. But the earlier turbos had a semi-closed deck block that usually did not have the gasket problem.

  • texasestexases Posts: 5,687

    @xwesx said: 2011 is the start of the FB engine block's use in the Forester. So, if you want to ensure you're getting a car with the new block design, don't include 2010 in your search. :)

    Another good reason to go for the FB design (2011 or newer) is that it now uses a timing chain instead of a belt. I'll not buy a car that has a timing belt.

  • rockmobilerockmobile Posts: 113

    @texases said: Another good reason to go for the FB design (2011 or newer) is that it now uses a timing chain instead of a belt. I'll not buy a car that has a timing belt.

    I guess 2011 thru 2013 would do the trick. No timing belt to worry about, and no CVT to worry about.

    According to the little I have read about CVTs, this kind of transmissions use some type of internal belts. Correct me if I'm wrong.

  • texasestexases Posts: 5,687

    I'm not a CVT fan, either. Not so much as far as reliability, the driving experience stinks for many of them. Some are OK, but a 'regular' 6+ speed automatic would be much better to me.

  • fandangofandango Posts: 18

    My 2007 Impreza 2.5i had to have the head gaskets redone at 150k miles. Did a valve resurfacing and changed the timing belt tensioner and water pump at the same time. Cost about $2100 at a reputable shop. The dealer had quoted $2500 for the same scope of work.

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