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Comments

  • good luck beating the citation/violation, A3... please let us know how it goes. your possible pending payment(s) may help to pay off California's debt to the rest of the planet, and especially to the other 56 USA states.
  • fintailfintail Posts: 48,397
    edited September 2013
    But you feel served and protected, right? Think of the children!

    You should go to Florida. It seems any kind of open arterial is posted at 50, and because it is a second world kind of place with perpetual property crime, mostly unpatrolled, so everyone goes 60+.
  • Mr_ShiftrightMr_Shiftright Sonoma, CaliforniaPosts: 64,490
    There are laws in some states regarding possible under-posting of realistic speed limits. If no surveys of that stretch of road were done in X years, you could possibly defend yourself on that basis. I researched this on law forums so it's valid--no guarantee the judge will buy it, but he may well be impressed by your research in this matter.
  • roadburnerroadburner Posts: 12,329
    Back in the early '90s when I handled Traffic Court I had a guy come in and defend an interstate speeding ticket using a letter from his urologist. The letter explained that the guy had a medical condition that made it hard to control his bladder, and the guy said he was speeding to get to the next exit. I put the guy on the deferral docket- no new tickets in 90 days and the case would be dismissed.
    After court the prosecutor(who drove a ragged Malibu wagon and thought that your head exploded at over 70 mph) asked me if I had considered that the doctor's letter may have been forged. I told him that I really didn't care- if anyone put that much work into beating a ticket I thought that they deserved to be rewarded for their efforts.

    Mine: 1995 318ti Club Sport; 2014 M235i; 2009 Cooper Clubman; 1999 Wrangler; 1996 Speed Triple Challenge Cup Replica Wife's: 2015 X1 xDrive28i Son's: 2009 328i

  • fintailfintail Posts: 48,397
    edited September 2013
    I bet traffic court prosecutors can be pretty rabid - their healthy pay and wacky pension probably depends on it. Serving and protecting, those brave defenders of justice.

    Lots of dopes on the road here yesterday. It rained much of the day, so half the "drivers" decided 10 under was a good speed. It's fun going 20 in a 30 that everyone goes 40 on because it was probably a 30 in 1940. Then in my neighborhood there was a power outage, first one in years. I saw numerous "drivers" speed through non-operational stoplights. I guess they don't teach that one in newbie fresh off the boat driving school. Eventually, there were tons of cops on the road in the area, so complaints must have been called in. Didn't see anyone pulled over, though.
  • steverstever Posts: 52,462
    Funny, we had a short outage here yesterday (surprisingly, we get few of these out in the boonies). Gave my new UPS a good test. I didn't bother going down to the one "light" to see if it was still flashing. :D
  • fintailfintail Posts: 48,397
    I have family out on the WA coast who loses power surprisingly infrequently too - but when they do lose it, it can be a mess, days at a time. Maybe the first or second time my area has lost it since the big storm of 06, not so bad seeing as so much is above ground here. Potential for another storm later today, maybe the mess yesterday worked through the system.

    Another bad driver trait I noticed last night when I went to the movies in a large mall complex with many levels of underground parking - some "drivers" fly through those garages. I bet they have fender benders all the time in there.
  • steverstever Posts: 52,462
    And probably lots of cameras to help establish fault.
  • fintailfintail Posts: 48,397
    edited September 2013
    I looked for that. They have random cameras in the parking areas, but I didn't really see any where I think the problems would develop, where the levels join the ramps, not sure how thy could judge speed, either. There's a kind of douchey club in this complex too - I bet the 1am 3er and Infiniti crowd is especially fun to drive with.
  • roadburnerroadburner Posts: 12,329
    I bet traffic court prosecutors can be pretty rabid - their healthy pay and wacky pension probably depends on it. Serving and protecting, those brave defenders of justice.

    Not in Kentucky. In fact, most of the prosecutors I had would do just about anything to keep from having to try a speeding case. The ones that went to trial usually involved defendants with an arrogant attitude who ticked off the cop, the prosecutor, or both. My usual prosecutor drove a Mustang GT- and she ran the living ^@%^ out of it all the time. During her tenure some people said that speeding wasn't a crime in our division of court... :p

    Mine: 1995 318ti Club Sport; 2014 M235i; 2009 Cooper Clubman; 1999 Wrangler; 1996 Speed Triple Challenge Cup Replica Wife's: 2015 X1 xDrive28i Son's: 2009 328i

  • fintailfintail Posts: 48,397
    edited September 2013
    I can believe it, risk of prosecution is connected to ego and attitude. Oh well, nobody pretends it isn't about the money anyway. Did the Mustang driving prosecutor ever get nabbed, or enjoy diplomatic immunity? Must have been in the olden days, now they all seem to drive fancy SUVs or BMWs and Audis, here anyway.

    I was out for a short bit today - got behind a woman with a confused deathgrip on her CRV's steering wheel, going maybe 10 under, traffic zooming by. Then got behind an Odyssey that came to a stop on an arterial street with a posted speed of 30 (real world is higher), playing with a phone and looking lost.
  • roadburnerroadburner Posts: 12,329
    Did the Mustang driving prosecutor ever get nabbed, or enjoy diplomatic immunity?

    Only once, AFAIK.

    Mine: 1995 318ti Club Sport; 2014 M235i; 2009 Cooper Clubman; 1999 Wrangler; 1996 Speed Triple Challenge Cup Replica Wife's: 2015 X1 xDrive28i Son's: 2009 328i

  • imidazol97imidazol97 Crossroads of America I70 & I75 Posts: 23,789
    >. Did the Mustang driving prosecutor ever get nabbed, or enjoy diplomatic immunity?

    All those folk have get out of jail free cards. For a time my wife was friends with a well known policeman's wife. She joked about how the officers would laugh when she got stopped about how they were going to kid Erdenbeckham (not his real name :)) about his wife speeding/making illegal left turn/usw when they saw him. She treated it as a joke.

    The rest of us, the "little" people, have to be mistreated by the officers who stop us.

    2015 Cruze 2LT, 2014 Malibu 2LT, 2008 Cobalt 2LT

  • fintailfintail Posts: 48,397
    When you can't get fired, you can do what you want, I guess.

    Around here there are a lot of trust fund jerks and investor visa criminals who speed around in high end cars - but I have yet to see one ever pulled over. Funny. Although to be fair, I do recall a few years ago, an 18 year old Russian kid in a late model M6 got nabbed for going 150+ on a bridge. But I am sure a lawyer solved the problem.

    This state also has "Law Enforcement Memorial" special plates, which I think act like FOP stickers.
  • fintailfintail Posts: 48,397
    edited September 2013
    Oh well, better than zero.

    Driving today, got behind a white Suburban tapping the brakes at random times and going slow. Passed it on the right, and saw an ~80 year old woman driving it, with a white knuckled grip at 11 and 1. Insanity. Such a vehicle should require a license endorsement for any driver, and a driver of her demographic should require some kind of competency test, too.

    Also saw quite a few phone yappers, one, a woman in an Accent going really slow and would pull up like a car length behind the stop line at a light. Also saw a guy in an G37 eating a cup of yogurt or something while "driving", and a big lack of turn signals from many "motorists".
  • xrunner2xrunner2 Posts: 3,062
    edited October 2013
    >>>>Driving today, got behind a white Suburban tapping the brakes at random times and going slow. Passed it on the right, and saw an ~80 year old woman driving it, with a white knuckled grip at 11 and 1.>>>>

    The seasoned citizens I see drive slower, but generally do not have cell phones to their heads and DO NOT weave in their lanes or start to come towards the center line at me on two lane highways. No, when I observe an idiot driver starting to weave toward the center line, it is not a seasoned citizen. It is a younger driver. Dirty Harry once said in general that a man has got to know his limitations. Same is true of drivers using cell phones that, unfortunately, do not realize their limitations. These driver/cell phone users stupidly say that they can MULTI-TASK.
  • fintailfintail Posts: 48,397
    edited October 2013
    Yes of course, people who are less likely to own new tech are less likely to use it while driving. Not sure how that is relevant though, outside of a way to distract from the other failings of older drivers.

    I do see affluent looking 60 somethings in highline cars who hold phones to their ear, as they likely are too inept to sync the bluetooth. Not the most responsible demographic either.

    I'd easily argue grandma, who was driving slow, tapping her brakes, and had a death grip on the wheel, also was outside of her limits, and shouldn't have been driving that 6000lb menace.
  • Mr_ShiftrightMr_Shiftright Sonoma, CaliforniaPosts: 64,490
    Hey, old people are fine behind the wheel. The problem is when you honk your horn and it startles them awake. :)
  • fintailfintail Posts: 48,397
    That reminds me - my fintail's horn can make people jump ;)

    I was a little irritated by the slow unstable Suburban, until I saw the driver - then I was just kind of wowed. My near-90 year old grandmother just stopped driving - she scraped a fender a few months ago and started doubting her abilities (although she rarely goes more than a couple miles from home and always on roads posted 40 or under). She's keeping her car for my uncle to drive her in, which I find amusing.
  • Mr_ShiftrightMr_Shiftright Sonoma, CaliforniaPosts: 64,490
    it's tough to hand over the car keys. Someday we will all have to face this decision; hopefully, we'll see the scrapes and dents and realize we aren't so sharp anymore.

    In my own case, I've ratcheted it down a notch, in the way that I drive, especially at night.
  • fintailfintail Posts: 48,397
    My other grandmother had to have them forced out of her hands. By then she was ~92, and had lost her abilities some time ago - luckily she lived in a small town and couldn't harm more than curbs and sidewalks.

    My mother is well into her 60s now, and hates to drive at night or in any kind of bad weather. I think she will slow dow gracefully enough.
  • Mr_ShiftrightMr_Shiftright Sonoma, CaliforniaPosts: 64,490
    There's no reason why a healthy person couldn't keep driving well into their early 80s....after that, I think they're pushing their luck. Even the world's greatest race drivers knew when to stop.
  • euphoniumeuphonium Great Northwest, West of the Cascades.Posts: 3,425
    "the world's greatest race drivers knew when to stop. "

    What stops the race driver is the loss of corporate sponsorship as the driver always thinks he's invincible.
  • Mr_ShiftrightMr_Shiftright Sonoma, CaliforniaPosts: 64,490
    Oh I meant retired race drivers who do charity events, etc.
  • xrunner2xrunner2 Posts: 3,062
    Today, while driving on a two-lane 55mph numbered state highway, saw a Chevy Cruze come up behind me while I was doing the limit. It was a woman holding a cell phone to her ear in her left hand. Came up to another numbered highway with a traffic signal and she was behind me blabbing while we were both waiting to make a left turn. When the green arrow appeared and I turned responsibly onto the highway at the intersection, noticed in glances in the mirror that this fool woman was still holding the cellphone to her left ear and turning the steering wheel with her right hand.

    Incredible recklessness by drivers in this cell phone age. They are actually young children in mentality in terms of NOT understanding responsibility for their actions.
  • euphoniumeuphonium Great Northwest, West of the Cascades.Posts: 3,425
    "turning the steering wheel with her right hand. "

    Maybe SHE knows what a "necker knob" is.
  • fintailfintail Posts: 48,397
    edited October 2013
    Saw the PNW driver trifecta during the evening commute. First a timid looking woman in a beige Camry who had a driving posture that just told you she was thinking that if she hit the speed limit, she'd be vaporized into a mist of subatomic particles. Then saw a typical overcompensating middle ager in a gigantic new F350 4x4 going maybe 60 in a 35, weaving in and out of traffic, no need for a signal. Finished it off by a younger dbag in a TSX who nearly hit a woman in a green signaled crosswalk.

    I went through a left turn lane on red, well, it probably turned red after I hit the crosswalk lines, as the untouchable oversalaried overpensioned "engineers" who control the signals decided that 4 cars through a sequence were fine...to hell with it, the 5th car is coming too. I shudder to think how much fuel and time is wasted at negligently maintained traffic controls.
  • stickguystickguy Posts: 34,070
    I generally try to not cheese yellows, but once in a while it just sort of happens. And I am always worried that the cops are all coming for me. Until I notice that at least 1, if not 2, people behind me just blew through dead red. Never fails.

    2019 Acura TLX A-spec 4 cyl. (mine), and 2013 Acura RDX AWD (wife's)

  • fintailfintail Posts: 48,397
    I don't usually do it either, but the ridiculous short duration of the green arrow irked me.

    No cops around, no cameras, a red delay, and lots of traffic (so the oncoming cars would be stopped) made me go for it. It beats sitting there idling away because someone dropped the ball again.
  • andres3andres3 Southern CAPosts: 11,082
    It wasn't just a little ways further up to turn left. The officer probably perfectly positioned himself at the center point on the down hill between the previous light and the next so that he could laser cars at their peak speed. Frankly, ridiculous as we all know he doesn't choose a closer spot to the first intersection in order to allow more time and room to accelerate, and he doesn't go closer to the next intersection, because, well heck, they might have slowed down by then!

    What is there to argue? Well, only the fact that no violation was committed. It is legal to drive up to 65 MPH in CA as long as it is safe reasonable, and prudent to do so, barring a few special exclusions (school zones for instance). No such exclusions applied to this road or in my particular case.

    The officer cannot simply issue BASIC SPEED LAW tickets simply because his laser readout shows a number higher than that posted on an adjacent aluminum sign. The law is clear, there must (in addition to exceeding the speed limit; note not the MAXIMUM speed limit) be something unreasonable, imprudent, and unsafe or hazardous happening. Law enforcement turning a blind eye to this fact will lead to disputes that a court should set right.

    There was no point to speeding in my case because I believe the terms of speeding weren't met (for instance, the sign might be posted too low). I was merely trying to get from point A to point B. If I was trying to get from point A to B as fast as possible, I'd of been going MUCH faster than 50 MPH.

    San Diego should save their own time by ceasing and desisting from trying to generate revenue with false accusations.

    In my opinion, I was driving slow, I was just going to go get a late lunch at a nearby place, and I was in no hurry. Had I been in a hurry he might of had a case (65.1 MPH and up faces the maximum speed law instead of basic speed law).
    '16 Audi TTS quattro 2.0T, '15 Audi A4 quattro 2.0T, '19 VW Tiguan SEL 4-Motion AWD
  • andres3andres3 Southern CAPosts: 11,082
    The reason you don't see "real" speeders pulled over is because the cops are only interested in the non-speeders.

    Basically, it's hard work to pull over someone going 90+ MPH, but it's easy pickings getting someone going 15 over.

    Since most speed limits are set about 15 under the real limit, I refer to it as non-speeders.
    '16 Audi TTS quattro 2.0T, '15 Audi A4 quattro 2.0T, '19 VW Tiguan SEL 4-Motion AWD
  • fintailfintail Posts: 48,397
    Makes perfect sense. 15 under seems to be about it, too. I swear. 35mph roads in my area are 50 in FL.

    Same reason I won't see a local in a high end car pulled over for the same infraction committed by the driver of a worn older car from several towns over. One is capable of more fight than the other.
  • xwesxxwesx Fairbanks, AlaskaPosts: 13,218
    So, after a transcontinental trek of 12,641 miles during the month of September, I can confidently say that the following awards are due! These awards are from a pool of eligible candidates spanning the northern portion (~40th parallel and above) of the continent.

    Most Pushy Award: Massachusetts
    Most Inconsistent Award: New York
    Most Clueless Award: Seattle Area (that's right, it's not a Washington-wide phenomenon!)
    2014 Audi Q7 TDI, 2008 and 2013 Subaru Forester(s), 1969 Chevrolet C20 Pickup, 1969 Ford Econoline 100, 1976 Ford F250 Pickup
  • backybacky Twin CitiesPosts: 18,934
    The officer probably perfectly positioned himself at the center point on the down hill between the previous light and the next so that he could laser cars at their peak speed.

    The unmitigated gall of that officer, to be positioned perfectly to laser cars at their peak speed! :)

    It appears you were driving too fast to notice important objects alongside the roadway... like the police cruiser. I wonder if that could be considered (by a judge) as driving in an imprudent or unsafe manner?

    So, if you were in a hurry you might tend to drive 65+ in a 35 zone? Say, let me know the next time you're driving in SD, I'll make a point not to visit there then.
  • fintailfintail Posts: 48,397
    I can agree with the latter part, for sure.

    I'm going on an 8 day road trip next week, and much of it will be spent east of the mountains. I'm looking forward to it.
  • andres3andres3 Southern CAPosts: 11,082
    It was police motorcycle, not a cruiser. I don't know where he was hiding, but for all I know he could of been beyond the sidewalk given he was on motorcycle.

    Either way he was purposely hiding; if he wasn't, I'd of seen him. I wasn't going so fast that if he pulled in front of me, I couldn't stop. I had the whole right lane to my right, in addition to the width of the parked cars alongside the right lane (and no, the parked cars do not invade the space of the right lane). It is a very wide road; hence the safeness of my speed.

    As to pulling in front of me; there aren't any side roads/side driveways, so what are the chances of that happening without it being done on purpose as well.

    Did you hear about the motorcyclist that brake checked the SUV in Manhattan and got charged with reckless driving. Video camera's are swinging the tide against brake checkers and left lane campers. Soon they will all be facing reckless driving charges. No longer will insurance companies be able to say 100% of rear-end collisions are so black and white. That alone will probably scare the brake-checkers out there.
    '16 Audi TTS quattro 2.0T, '15 Audi A4 quattro 2.0T, '19 VW Tiguan SEL 4-Motion AWD
  • backybacky Twin CitiesPosts: 18,934
    What is the stopping distance (including think time) of a car at 35 mph? At 50 mph? At 65+ mph (since you said you might drive that fast if you're in a hurry)?

    Speed increases the risk of a collision. Doubling speed quadruples stopping distance.

    Where was the police bike parked and where did it come from if there aren't any side roads/driveways? Parked on someone's lawn? You really don't know because you didn't see it until it was behind you.

    I have no idea what the brake checking incident in Manhattan has to do with your situation. Enjoy your court battle. You seem to revel in them.
  • andres3andres3 Southern CAPosts: 11,082
    A good car can stop from 60 MPH in about 120'. According to your numbers then, a car going 30 should be able to stop in 30'. But not all emergency maneuvers require emergency braking; an emergency lane change could work just as well.

    Your comment about speed increasing the risk of a collision is falling on deaf ears. That statement makes no sense whatsoever. Have any studies or statistics to back that up? More collisions per vehicle mile at 60 MPH vs. 30 MPH for instance? I think you'll find the opposite is true (I know... streets more dangerous than freeways so unfair comparison, blah blah blah).

    Say speed increases the risk of a collision is like saying 10 light years is a long time. Someone mentioned light-years are a distance measurement, not a time measurement. Speed is a velocity measurement, not a collision measurement. Do fast moving asteroids hit the Earth more often than slow moving asteroids, for instance?
    '16 Audi TTS quattro 2.0T, '15 Audi A4 quattro 2.0T, '19 VW Tiguan SEL 4-Motion AWD
  • andres3andres3 Southern CAPosts: 11,082
    I do not revel in court battles. I hate them. I'm procrastinating my case as we speak.

    Part of the problem is in the change of computers and flash drives over the years I think some of my Word Document files may have been lost in the shuffle, and I'm dreading having to re-write and redo things.
    '16 Audi TTS quattro 2.0T, '15 Audi A4 quattro 2.0T, '19 VW Tiguan SEL 4-Motion AWD
  • backybacky Twin CitiesPosts: 18,934
    It's not rocket science. Any situation that could involve an accident and involves braking to avoid the accident has higher risk of an accident as speed increases, which increases braking time/distance. What about that formula don't you understand?

    Yes, lane changes can avoid accidents sometime also. But sometimes that isn't possible, and braking is the way out.

    It has nothing to do with asteroids. It has to do with basic physics. Which apparently you don't believe apply to you in your own little universe where you should be able to drive as fast as YOU want to drive.
  • snakeweaselsnakeweasel a Certified Edmunds Poster.Posts: 15,696
    Backy, don't even try to argue with him on this. He thinks he is right and that's all that counts with him. Would you believe that he once told me he was safer driving faster as it means that he is on the road a shorter amount of time and therefore less likely to be in an accident?

    Of course you are right that as speed increases it takes longer to stop a car (by the square of the increase of speed) and it increases the force of an impact if the accident cannot be avoided. And while you can steer around an object the faster you are going the harder it is to move a vehicle out of a straight line and increases the likelihood that such an action could cause an accident.

    2008 Sebring Ragtop, 2011 Hyundai Sonata, 2014 BMW 428i convertible, 2015 Honda CTX700D

  • xwesxxwesx Fairbanks, AlaskaPosts: 13,218
    snakeweasel! Good to see you around! ;-)
    2014 Audi Q7 TDI, 2008 and 2013 Subaru Forester(s), 1969 Chevrolet C20 Pickup, 1969 Ford Econoline 100, 1976 Ford F250 Pickup
  • backybacky Twin CitiesPosts: 18,934
    Would you believe that he once told me he was safer driving faster as it means that he is on the road a shorter amount of time and therefore less likely to be in an accident?

    You know, I can actually see some logic in that. Taken in isolation, no other factors considered, the shorter a time you are on the road, the less chance you have to be in an accident. Similar to, the less you fly, the less chance you have of being in an airplane accident.

    Unfortunately, there ARE other factors to be considered. Otherwise we'd all drive at 100+ mph to spend as little time on the road as possible. ;)
  • imidazol97imidazol97 Crossroads of America I70 & I75 Posts: 23,789
    >Backy, don't even try to argue...

    Right spot on. Great post.

    >as speed increases

    May I add that the distance covered during the reaction time also increases in addition to the stopping distance for the vehicle once the braking is invoked.

    2015 Cruze 2LT, 2014 Malibu 2LT, 2008 Cobalt 2LT

  • andres3andres3 Southern CAPosts: 11,082
    edited October 2013
    There was more to it then that. For example, you are less likely to be rear-ended going 100 MPH than you are going 55 MPH.

    Also, you are less likely to have someone camping in your blind spot at 100 MPH than you are at 55 MPH; so therefore if you make a smooth lane change even if someone was in your blind spot by the time you complete the lane change your a safe distance in front of them.

    The fact is, most accidents are not from objects suddenly darting out in front of you (especially in controlled access freeways where high speeds are more likely).

    Also, an emergency avoidance maneuver could never be the cause of an accident, unless it was performed in a negligent manner. The person or object forcing the emergency maneuver in the first place is the cause of the accident, the speed is irrelevant. I don't cut off vehicles as a pedestrian going 10 MPH, nor 100 MPH. In either case, the pedestrian is the one flinging themselves in front of the car.

    If I throw my body in front of a car going 10 MPH; I'll probably live.

    If I throw my body in front of a car going 100 MPH I'll likely die.

    Neither result changes the cause of the accident. I don't understand why this simple logic escapes some of you.
    '16 Audi TTS quattro 2.0T, '15 Audi A4 quattro 2.0T, '19 VW Tiguan SEL 4-Motion AWD
  • explorerx4explorerx4 Central CTPosts: 13,861
    Why don't you see if you can get your case transferred to Judge Judy?
    Then you can make that argument and we call all watch it on youtube.
    2017 Ford Fusion SE 2017 Ford F-150 Limited
  • snakeweaselsnakeweasel a Certified Edmunds Poster.Posts: 15,696
    Even in isolation I would find that not to be the case. I am out on vacation right now (a family reunion of sorts) and I took a back road way in. One road I took was rather rustic, narrow hilly and lots of curves but absolutely no traffic on it for the 8 or so miles it ran. It was a beautiful road. Now I could have driven that road at maybe 10 MPH or so faster but it would have left no room for error. Just one misjudged curve and I would have been in trouble.

    2008 Sebring Ragtop, 2011 Hyundai Sonata, 2014 BMW 428i convertible, 2015 Honda CTX700D

  • xrunner2xrunner2 Posts: 3,062
    Just what is this infatuation with speed? Seems immature and infantile? Why not just obey the speed limit and not have to worry about police and tickets and going to court? What is the reason, rationale for wanting to break speed limits? And by more than just 5 over? Is there a thrill? A high? Like on a drug?
  • snakeweaselsnakeweasel a Certified Edmunds Poster.Posts: 15,696
    you are less likely to be rear-ended going 100 MPH than you are going 55 MPH.

    And you are less likely to rear-end someone going 55 MPH than you are at 100 MPH.

    Also, an emergency avoidance maneuver could never be the cause of an accident, unless it was performed in a negligent manner.

    You go right ahead and go on believing that but the fact of the matter is that the faster you are going the harder and more dangerous avoidance maneuvers are.

    If I throw my body in front of a car going 10 MPH; I'll probably live.

    That's because that at 10 MPH the driver can better stop or avoid you. Say you jump out 25 feet in front of the car the 10 MPH car has 1.7 seconds to react and can stop the car or turn in that distance. The 100 MPH drive has only 0.17 seconds before hitting you. That means that as soon as he realizes you are there he hit you. Even if his reactions were instantaneous he wouldn't be able to stop or avoid you.

    I don't understand why this simple logic escapes you.

    2008 Sebring Ragtop, 2011 Hyundai Sonata, 2014 BMW 428i convertible, 2015 Honda CTX700D

  • fintailfintail Posts: 48,397
    edited October 2013
    What's the fear of speed? Seems immature and infantile. I can look back and find roads that my grandfather was driving on 60 years ago that carry the same limits now. The speed limit system in the US must be 90% for revenue. What's the reason to blindly conform and submit to arbitrary, obsolete, and asinine regulations created and enforced by groups with no accountability? Is it a warm feeling, patriotic to the ignorant? There needs to be more widespread questioning and disobedience - as it took an eon to do away with 55 when it became irrelevant. Oh yeah, think of the children!
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