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Would this 1954 Chevy be worth restoring? Is it even possible?

pluckieduckiepluckieduckie Member Posts: 3
edited October 2015 in Chevrolet

I'm new to the restoration game. We bought my husband a 67 mustang and i have car envy and wanted my dream car to restore together. Im in love. She has all the right curves in all the right places, but i need to know just by looking at whats visable here if this is even feasible. Thoughts from the veterans?

Best Answers

Answers

  • pluckieduckiepluckieduckie Member Posts: 3
    The mustang is not my style. Too "new". I like my ladies curvy. I really want a mid to early 50s truck. What should i be looking for in a realistic restore and what would be an acceptable price range. Ive seen everything from 850.00 like this one to 5000.00 as restore project car. I have a second choice but i dont know a  ton about this style. 
  • fintailfintail Member Posts: 53,176
    With a lot of early 50s passenger cars, smart money is getting one with good cosmetics and no huge needs, as they aren't really increasing in value . Buy the nicest you can afford, unless you want a labor of love, it will be cheaper in the long run - then you can just restore it little by little, and enjoy it in the meantime.

    Trucks have fared better in the market, but there's a limit too. Finding a vehicle that already looks OK and is roadworthy will probably make life easier.
  • pluckieduckiepluckieduckie Member Posts: 3
    I'm starting up front with a small amount and adding over a long period of time. I have a 5 year plan....
  • texasestexases Member Posts: 9,539
    Without knowing your skills, experience, and capabilities (tools, garage space, etc.) it's hard to make a recommendation.
  • uplanderguyuplanderguy Kent, OHMember Posts: 13,323
    If you can do some or (better) much of the mechanical work and metal fabrication (e.g., floors if needed) you'll be miles ahead of the game. If you can't--like I couldn't when I had a Studebaker Lark restored over 20 years ago--it's better to find one that's in good shape up-front. My car was rusty but had two very unusual factory features or I'd have looked for another one. That era Chevy still seems plentiful to me and I live in rusty NE Ohio.

    Good luck, no matter what you decide. The search is half the fun!
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