Why No Forward-View Cameras for Cars ?

alternatoralternator IndianaMember Posts: 629
edited March 2017 in Genesis
I would like a forward-view camera that would work like a rear-view camera, so I can tell how close I'm coming to the wall or car or whatever I'm parking close to.

No car manufacturer offers this that I know of. Is there an after-market camera that could be used for this purpose ?

Answers

  • PF_FlyerPF_Flyer Pennsylvania Furnace, PAMember Posts: 9,372
    My brother-in-law uses a device on the wall in his garage that lets him know that he's pulled far enough into the garage, but it's not on the car. I don't think something like this is likely to be offered by a manufacturer anytime soon. When the car is in motion, your eyes are the forward view camera, aren't they?
  • alternatoralternator IndianaMember Posts: 629
    I want camera as an aid to parking wherever. I don't creep forward till I hit something softly, as some do !!
  • texasestexases Member Posts: 10,058
    Several new cars offer cameras giving a 360 degree view. I don't know where you can get one in the aftermarket.
  • Mr_ShiftrightMr_Shiftright Sonoma, CaliforniaMember Posts: 64,482
    Sounds like what you want is a front parking sensor (beeper). Problem with those, though is that they aren't activated by the reverse back-up lights, like the rear sensors are, so they would be on all the time--and that's a real pain. If you had a sensor (or a camera) up front you'd have to turn it on manually for when you specifically need it.
  • kyfdxkyfdx Moderator Posts: 207,899

    Sounds like what you want is a front parking sensor (beeper). Problem with those, though is that they aren't activated by the reverse back-up lights, like the rear sensors are, so they would be on all the time--and that's a real pain. If you had a sensor (or a camera) up front you'd have to turn it on manually for when you specifically need it.

    Our front sensors are triggered by putting the vehicle into reverse. (2011 BMW X3)
    A camera would be handy, like with the rear sensors, but between having sensors at all four corners and a backup camera, it's pretty darned easy to park.

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  • alternatoralternator IndianaMember Posts: 629
    Mr. Shiftright, I wouldn't mind manually activating such a camera at all.

    My Honda Civic rear view camera allows me to safely park within inches of any obstacle in the rear. I don't understand why car manufacturers couldn't provide such help for parking close to a forward-located obstacle. Wouldn't cost much. First one to do it can claim the laurels.

    So many less-helpful features have been tacked on, and even become standard issue after awhile.

    I'm leaving my question open, hoping for still more replies.

  • PF_FlyerPF_Flyer Pennsylvania Furnace, PAMember Posts: 9,372

    Are you having trouble figuring out how to use all of the technology in your car? If you're overwhelmed with how to operate your navigation system, bluetooth, park assist or other advanced technology feature, a reporter would love to talk to you about your experience.

    Please send an email to [email protected] by Friday, March 17, 2017.
  • xwesxxwesx Fairbanks, AlaskaMember Posts: 15,865
    I just purchased an Audi Q7 a couple of weeks ago, and the dealer where my car was located had another with the "technology package." Sadly, this package only contained nanny add-ons, so I wrote it off due to the additional price the dealer wanted for it.

    But, one of those nanny adds was a multi-view camera. It was actually pretty easy to operate using the scroll wheel that comes with the infotainment unit on that vehicle. So, they are out there.

    Frankly, though, now owning a vehicle with parking sensors and a backup camera has only solidified my stance that such "features" are just plain silly. For me, they are annoying at best, and infuriating at worst. Here's why:

    1. A good driver should always know the limits of their vehicle. This includes the physical dimensions, and how to judge those dimensions relative to the driver's perspective in the car. With this skill, the driver can safely navigate within two inches of any obstacle.

    2. The cameras are subject to obstructions such as ice, snow, water, dirt, etc.

    3. Sensors are subject to false-positives, including those listed above.

    I'm not a fan of the beeping (it would start when objects were as many as two or more feet from the vehicle), but there were several instances where these systems drove me crazy:

    1. Ice build up on the front bumper while driving through a blizzard. The stupid car started blaring at me any time we drove slowly (<10 mph, IIRC), as if we were in critical danger of hitting an object in front of us.

    2. We carried a cargo tray for part of our trip, and this rendered the sensors completely useless for backing up (see #1 above), as well as the camera since it was just looking at the tray behind us.

    3. I could not turn the system off! Even when you tell it to be "off," it is still on... just much, much quieter.

    4. Long delays on switching from the backup camera to the normal screen display. This vehicle is much quicker (nearly instantaneous) than my 2013 Passat to activate the camera once engaging 'reverse,' but it takes ten or more seconds to go back to normal mode after selecting 'drive.'
    2018 Subaru Crosstrek, 2014 Audi Q7 TDI, 2013 Subaru Forester, 1969 Chevrolet C20, 1969 Ford Econoline 100, 1976 Ford F250
  • PF_FlyerPF_Flyer Pennsylvania Furnace, PAMember Posts: 9,372
    We have a backup camera in our Note, and while it's helpful once in a while, it's not very helpful on a sunny day (display hard to see) and like you said, it's important to KNOW where the edges of your vehicle are.
  • alternatoralternator IndianaMember Posts: 629
    xwesx: Your comment "A good driver should always know the limits of their vehicle. This includes the physical dimensions, and how to judge those dimensions relative to the driver's perspective in the car. With this skill, the driver can safely navigate within two inches of any obstacle" blows my mind.

    I don't believe even one driver in a ten thousand could do this. I certainly can't (I've driven over one million accident-free miles to date) and I'm sure I wouldn't be able to do that even with many hours of practice.

    In any case, my 2016 Honda Civic EX rear-view camera (with "downward" view) allows me to dependably back up to within a foot of an obstacle, which is all I'm looking for. And I've never found weather causing any problems yet. But I certainly appreciate the details you put into your reply.
  • xwesxxwesx Fairbanks, AlaskaMember Posts: 15,865

    xwesx: Your comment "A good driver should always know the limits of their vehicle. This includes the physical dimensions, and how to judge those dimensions relative to the driver's perspective in the car. With this skill, the driver can safely navigate within two inches of any obstacle" blows my mind.

    I don't believe even one driver in a ten thousand could do this. I certainly can't (I've driven over one million accident-free miles to date) and I'm sure I wouldn't be able to do that even with many hours of practice.

    In any case, my 2016 Honda Civic EX rear-view camera (with "downward" view) allows me to dependably back up to within a foot of an obstacle, which is all I'm looking for. And I've never found weather causing any problems yet. But I certainly appreciate the details you put into your reply.

    To be clear, I was not trying to denigrate anyone with that statement. The importance of this knowledge was driven into me when I was first learning to drive as a young teen, and that was part of the practice we went through to hone our driving skills. With practice, it is actually quite transferable from vehicle to vehicle, even if one is unfamiliar with it (such as rentals).

    Practical applications include parking lots, parallel parking, garage parking, and connecting trailers. I think most of us can say that we encounter these scenarios (one or more, anyway) on nearly a daily basis. Cameras help serve this same purpose, so there is value in both the skill and the technology. I am just advocating that the tech does not supercede the skill.

    One thing that the cameras do that win hands down, though, is that they allow a driver to actually "see" what is in range of the camera that is otherwise out of the driver's view. So, if the driver misses something entering that blind spot (such as a small child), that tech can suddenly be priceless. This, however, is not a common scenario, and therefore does not necessitate the presence of such technology.
    2018 Subaru Crosstrek, 2014 Audi Q7 TDI, 2013 Subaru Forester, 1969 Chevrolet C20, 1969 Ford Econoline 100, 1976 Ford F250
  • xwesxxwesx Fairbanks, AlaskaMember Posts: 15,865
    I think we'll see the multi-view cameras becoming more prevalent as stages of "self-driving" technology are released.
    2018 Subaru Crosstrek, 2014 Audi Q7 TDI, 2013 Subaru Forester, 1969 Chevrolet C20, 1969 Ford Econoline 100, 1976 Ford F250
  • alternatoralternator IndianaMember Posts: 629
    I lived in Alaska for awhile myself. That long, long winter leaves you with lots of time to kill doesn't it ? I'm just making a joke.

    Your comments are always welcome.
  • texasestexases Member Posts: 10,058
    I'm a big fan of backup cameras, now that rear visibility is so terrible on most all cars. Next vehicle will likely be a CUV, they're the worst! Current Forester is the best of them, but still worse than our 2007 Forester. Most all others have the upswept beltline, and blackout glass on the rear/side windows concealing their true tiny sizes.
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