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Am I crazy?

raymond08080raymond08080 Posts: 1
edited March 2018 in Ford
Have a chance to buy a 1987 Ford Econoline ambulance with 58k miles. It has no rust, starts and drives, belts seem good. I want to use it lightly to work on a "this old house" project my wife got me into. Am I looking for trouble going into a 31 year old van? Are there folks who still work on these?

Comments

  • kyfdxkyfdx Posts: 148,714

    Have a chance to buy a 1987 Ford Econoline ambulance with 58k miles. It has no rust, starts and drives, belts seem good. I want to use it lightly to work on a "this old house" project my wife got me into. Am I looking for trouble going into a 31 year old van? Are there folks who still work on these?

    They should be easy to work on. Guessing it has a straight six?

    How much?

    Did you get a good deal? Be sure to come back and share!

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  • Mr_ShiftrightMr_Shiftright Sonoma, CaliforniaPosts: 64,490
    edited March 2018
    IF you can drive it on a test for 1/2 hour, and nothing catches fire or leaks out, and if it's still running after 30 minutes and is cheap, then sure, buy it. You can find parts anywhere and they are pretty easy to work on unless you have to pull engine out or the head off of it.

    What are they asking? If it's in nice shape, $1,500 to $3,000 seems all the money.

    Oh, and check the tires. A $2000 van needing 4 tires is a $2,600 van.
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