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Toy, Model & Collectible Replica Cars

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Comments

  • fintailfintail Posts: 47,555
    Wow, I browsed around that site and that company has some models of really common workaday cars from the period. Omnirizons, a Diplomat, K-cars, a 70s woody, Granada, and others...very amusing. I have never seen those before.
  • boomchekboomchek Vancouver, BC, CanadaPosts: 5,440
    I only see that line at Walmart. I was surprised when I first saw them a bout a year or two ago too. Pretty neat if you ask me.

    Another company I found, not sure of their name, makes darn good 1:64 scale models of average to high end cars. They're less expensive than Hot Wheel or Matchbox, and they come in the normal square boxes with windows like old Matchbox used to be (not blister packs).

    I bought a version of my C240, for about a buck, and the detailing is as good if not better than Matchbox.

    boomchek: driven 10,000+ cars, sold 1000+ cars, owned 50+ cars

  • fintailfintail Posts: 47,555
    The next time I am at Wally World (which is maybe once a year) I will keep an eye out. Who wouldn't want a scale model of a Plymouth Horizon or a Chevette? :P

    I don't look at modern toys/models so much as I can never find any of cars I like, so I rarely bother. What you describe sounds familiar though, I remember some small models where the black window detailing was decent.
  • writerwriter Posts: 121
    Regarding manufacturers models of real cars that were "commonly bought", there are a few around that are very similar but as far as I can tell are completely separate. These are all products you find in regular department stores such as Walmart.

    First, there are Maisto and MotorMax. Their products range from not very good to very good. They have a few lines (labels) for different markets. MotorMax has the "Fresh Cherries" line that has been mentioned lately. They also produce the "American Grafitti" lines and their own MotorMax lines. The "AG" line has tended to be more a hot cars line and includes some true hot rod styles. Maisto has been making some of the more common vehicles too, at similar prices but I am not sure of the labels.

    Priced a bit higher is "Johnny Lightning". "Johnny Lightning" are generally a bit better quality and often "limited" production runs specifically aimed at collectors. Johnny Lightning sometimes rebrands cars produced by other makers. Recently I saw a Johnny Lightning 70's Barracuda and when I looked under it, it was a "Hot Wheels".

    Lastly is "Jada" which is focussed mainly on hot rods and tuners. They produce some regular street vehicles, but usually limited to car fan markets (lots of Mustangs, but I do not expect to see a Ford Fairlane). They did produce a nice 1939 Chevy sedan a year or two ago. If they see a growing market in the ordinary car market they might move into it.
  • andys120andys120 Loudon NHPosts: 20,289
    As for makers of everyday cars you should take note of Yat Ming and Sun Star from China as well as Ertl, Franklin Mint and Danbury Mint of the USA, they make a variety of Big Three cars from the 50's and 60's, perhaps a few from the 70s in various scales, cheifly 1/18 and 1/24.

    Yat Ming's 1970 Rambler Rebel in 1/18>
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    Sun Star's '52 Nash Ambassador in 1/18>
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    2000 BMW 528i, 2001 BMW 330CiC

  • boomchekboomchek Vancouver, BC, CanadaPosts: 5,440
    I like some of Maisto cars, I even have their whole set of GM design cars from about 6 years ago. Their 1:18 scale cars are affordable and look good.

    There's a company that's called Fast Lane I think that make cars from old Matchbox casts but worse in quality. They remind me of some of the old Matchboxes I had, but I haven't bought them, as they're realyl budget looking.

    I like Jada's stuff and have some of their toys too. Johny Lightning is probably my favourite as they have lots of different themes including TV and movie cars (I have someof the Simpsons cars).

    i like Jada's "For Sale" collection that features beat up and aged cars. Very realistic but i have none of them.

    boomchek: driven 10,000+ cars, sold 1000+ cars, owned 50+ cars

  • fintailfintail Posts: 47,555
    I remember about 10 years ago I bought a Johnny Lightning toy of a Ford Torino Elite for a friend of mine, as his parents had one when he was a kid and it scarred him for life. That's a pretty crappy everyday car.

    I think the last 1:18 car I bought was around 1996, when I bought a Revell 1:18 300SE fintail. Since then, I have bought mostly vintage items.
  • lemkolemko Philadelphia, PAPosts: 15,306
    ...from Sun Star's Platinum Series. It actually has spring-loaded windshield wipers and is nice for a "cheap" model:

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    1958 Buick Limited hardtop
  • roadburnerroadburner Posts: 12,098
    Kyosho 2002 Turbo

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    UT 318iS

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    Mine: 1995 318ti Club Sport; 2014 M235i; 2009 Cooper Clubman; 1999 Wrangler; 1996 Speed Triple Challenge Cup Replica Wife's: 2015 X1 xDrive28i Son's: 2009 328i

  • fintailfintail Posts: 47,555
    That 2002 looks pretty good.

    Reminds me, the second-to-last 1:18 car I bought was a Kyosho Supra. It's a very nice model.

    I have noticed the excellent company Minichamps has a lot of ordinary 60-80s European cars in their lineup, but no fintails that I know of. I do have an excellent 1:43 560SEL by them, along with a few cars I bought in the 90s but I think are stored away in my mom's attic today.
  • roadburnerroadburner Posts: 12,098
    I've got about two dozen 1:43 Minichamps. The latest is a limited edition(1 of 6000) model of the Mazda 787B that won Le Mans in 1991.

    Mine: 1995 318ti Club Sport; 2014 M235i; 2009 Cooper Clubman; 1999 Wrangler; 1996 Speed Triple Challenge Cup Replica Wife's: 2015 X1 xDrive28i Son's: 2009 328i

  • writerwriter Posts: 121
    "I remember about 10 years ago I bought a Johnny Lightning toy of a Ford Torino Elite for a friend of mine, as his parents had one when he was a kid and it scarred him for life. That's a pretty crappy everyday car."

    Oh come on now. The Torino could not have been *that* bad. Uh, was it?
    :-)

    Oddly, I realize that I have never known anyone with a Torino. It might have been a neighbourhood thing. Where I lived, Fords tended to be Mustangs and eventually Mavericks. I have no idea why.

    Speaking of Walmart and this "ordinary cars" stuff, I have been in Walmart this last week and they seem to be in their seasonal changes, and some new stuff showed up.

    I bought a MotorMax Maverick for my friend. It is a 1/64th scale, which is probably the best choice. He is not a big car fan, and I just thought that he would enjoy having it, sort of like a picture of his mother's former car, but in 3D.

    I also bought an American Graffiti 1939 Chevy Coupe police car. I saw this '39 Chevy last year in their regular lineup with a regular paint job (a very nice looking brown as I recall), but I passed it up. When I saw this one, I thought about it again, and for now, I think it is as close as I will get to the '37 that I really want, so I decided to take one. There are no police car modifications on it. There is only the black and white paint job and "Highway Patrol" markings. If I want to, I can repaint the doors later and it will be a plain Coupe again.

    On the website, they also have a 1/24th 1948 Chev fastback in police car trim. I might buy one of those too to sit on the shelf with this one. The '48 is not particularly special to me for any reason, but it is a nice looking car.
  • lemkolemko Philadelphia, PAPosts: 15,306
    image

    Majorette Mercedes-Benz 450SEL. At least I THINK this is it. It had seperate red lenses for the taillights which I thought was a nice touch compared to a lot of cruder replicas.
  • fintailfintail Posts: 47,555
    That might be based on a Majorette casting, but I don't think it's a Majorette car - the wheel spoke design is not anything I am familiar with from that firm, and I believe their 450SEL had colored turn signal lenses and headlights too. I think the Majorette 450SEL was made primarily with three spoke wheels.

    The W116 was made by a number of makers in the smaller scale...Matchbox had one too, along with Tomy.
  • fintailfintail Posts: 47,555
    I see a lot of their models in "limited edition", some of their models are obscure enoguh to create low demand and a low production run. The 560SEL I have is something like 1 of 3500 (maybe based around color too)....but I doubt there are 3500 people in the world who want a 1:43 models of a late 1980s S-class :blush:
  • fintailfintail Posts: 47,555
    Modifying existing models to ones liking can be a hobby all in its own. I remember I did this a bit when I was younger...especially to models of 1930s era cars, which always became WW2 cars for my obsessive Lego street scenes. I never got into model kits too much as I'd make a mess, but I had a lot of metal cars. I'd also turn MB sedans into rally cars once they had reached a certain state of decay from being played with. Blacking out the wheels and adding some numbers and decals can do a lot.
  • lemkolemko Philadelphia, PAPosts: 15,306
    You're probably right; this is a knockoff. I think the car I had did have the proper headlight lenses too. This was over 30 years ago, so my memory is foggy. I recall that it was really nice for a diecast toy - nicer than a Matchbox version of the same car. It was gold similar to the pic I posted. I have seen some HORRIBLE knockoffs of the Majorette 1980s Cadillac Brougham limo I have.
  • lemkolemko Philadelphia, PAPosts: 15,306
    Most of my diecast cars ended up going to relatives' younger kids when my Mom thought I was "too old" for toy cars. Unfortunately, my cousins had as little regard for those diecasts then as they do their real cars today and they were all promptly destroyed. Heck, I used to care for my diecast cars like my real cars and I'd even wax and polish them when they got dirty. Of course, I couldn't resist blowing up a few of the cheaper or rattier ones with firecrackers back in the day. The "wrecks" then would then be displayed in a miniature junkyard behind a plastic model gas station on my HO model train set.
  • fintailfintail Posts: 47,555
    Yeah, the Matchbox was the crudest of the W116s I have seen...Matchbox really went downhill by the late 70s, far off their fine detailing and excellent proportions of the 50s and 60s. It took a few years for Matchbox to regain some form. The Tomy 450SEL was comparable to the Majorette, but with no lenses.

    I remember I had several Majorette cars, and the detail impressed me. I remember a MB 190, a Volvo 740, a Peugeot 205, a rounded T-Bird, a 5-door Saab, among many others. Majorette cars were good for foreign looking street scenes, as they made other-market vans and trucks too. Sadly, all were played with and I don't think I have most of them anymore.

    I had a couple of those Majorette limos, one was green and the other was a pearl white. Long gone too.
  • fintailfintail Posts: 47,555
    LOL, I tried to wax some of my cars too. I still do that when I find a vintage toy that is grimey, I use a very light application of cleaner wax.

    My parents, being involved with antiques, always had a couple treadle sewing machines around, along with weird old tools etc. Those treadle machines will destroy a small diecast car if you get the base part moving fast enough. I remember my Majorette Saab was claimed that way - without my knowledge. Didn't make me happy. But then they became junkyard or disaster scene props for the Lego town I built.

    Many early Matchbox survived because of HO layouts - the scale is not perfect, but they were far superior to other small models 50 years ago.
  • lemkolemko Philadelphia, PAPosts: 15,306
    Matchbox also strayed away from making replicas of actual production cars and made a lot of STUPID Hotwheels-like customs. The 1970s was clearly Matchbox's low point. Funny how diecasts were becoming just as shoddy and tacky as real '70s cars?
  • fintailfintail Posts: 47,555
    It fits with my "everything was crap in the 70s" mantra...of course, I was born in the depths of the 70s, so maybe I should be careful with that :P

    Matchbox had panic when free-rolling Hot Wheels designs hit the market, and they overreacted. Gone was the fine modeling and detail, replaced by new wheels and crazy designs. It took until around the time of the 1982 collapse of Lesney for the ship to be righted. I always looked at each brand as very different when I was a kid, and they should have kept more of that.
  • andys120andys120 Loudon NHPosts: 20,289
    Here's my collection of 1/18th scale Porsche Sports/endurance racers of the late 60's and early 70s, most are 917s but the double arrow car is the 908/3 that won the last real Targo Florio in 1970 (Redman/Siffert).>

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    2000 BMW 528i, 2001 BMW 330CiC

  • lemkolemko Philadelphia, PAPosts: 15,306
    ...from the golden age of Matchbox:

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    1964 Chevrolet Impala taxi

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    1964 Cadillac Sayers & Scoville ambulance
  • fintailfintail Posts: 47,555
    If you want Matchbox GM, their 59 Impala was a real classic little car:

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    That 64 when found with grey wheels is a high rarity and is worth a tidy sum.

    Those 60s models were from their pinnacle of detailing and proportion, pretty much perfect models for that scale.
  • lemkolemko Philadelphia, PAPosts: 15,306
    This is the one I REALLY want!

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    1958 Cadillac Sixty Special
  • fintailfintail Posts: 47,555
    I think a MIB one should be able to be had for $100-150.

    I have one of those, but it's a beater.
  • lemkolemko Philadelphia, PAPosts: 15,306
    Two M-B classics for our Poncho fans:

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    1960 Pontiac Ventura convertible

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    1964? Pontiac Grand Prix
  • fintailfintail Posts: 47,555
    Matchbox made a few decent versions of American Fords too...56 and 59 wagons, a 58-60 T-Bird, and a 61 sedan come to mind
  • boomchekboomchek Vancouver, BC, CanadaPosts: 5,440
    I only remember the early 80s Matchboxes as that's when I started getting them, but it looks like the ones beofre were neat too.

    I was never a fan of Majorettes as most of the ones in late 80s had funky looking big wheels, and the play sets that came with the cars were not to scale, or at least the figurines. The people looked way bigger than the cars.

    boomchek: driven 10,000+ cars, sold 1000+ cars, owned 50+ cars

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