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Jeep Liberty Diesel

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Comments

  • synlubessynlubes Posts: 184
    you mean i have to move to switzerland to run my oil just kidding your answer from motori was correct but you have to remember they are mechanical engineers not lubrication engineers
  • hamchamphamchamp Posts: 33
    Farout, Just wondered while you were waiting for your replacement vehicle, did you get any paperwork stating what your deal was. Also, when did you know when your deal was finalized and what you had to pay. Did anyone stay in touch with you. We called ISG and left a msg. but haven't had a call back in 2 or 3 weeks. I did call the 1-800 Customer number and spoke to a gentlemen, who told us that the Jeep was listed for a replacement. He referred us to ISG., however they haven't responded. Thank you Hamchamp
  • goodcrdgoodcrd Posts: 253
    Does anyone else notice the A/C compressor cycling on and off at a stop light with the HVAC set to floor heat with the A/C button not engaged? I just noticed it while stopped at a long light. I don't want to take it back to the dealer but this will hurt my fuel economy.
  • 05crdjeep05crdjeep Posts: 59
    That operation is normal. They all do that.

    I think the presumption is that you're muddy or wet feet make moisture and dry air coming out on the floor will fog the windows less.

    AC cycles on Defrost settings as well.
  • nescosmonescosmo Posts: 453
    Goodcd... I do not think so it is the heater. the heater act and look like the a/c, it has a clutch; You can see it on the left hand side of the engine.

    Nescosmo.
  • winter2winter2 Posts: 1,801
    Synlubes,

    Something funny struck me late last night. If you go on the Amsoil website and look at the recommended products, the European Blend 5W-40 is the recommended oil for the CRD by Amsoil, not the 5W-30 that you are using.
  • synlubessynlubes Posts: 184
    you are right but the 5-30 3000 is the best oil amsoil makes but it is exspenife big diesels all over the world have ran on 30 weight oil for years and the big powerplants today still run a lot of 30 weight the new cars are already are recomending 5-20 oils all fords and most crysler products and getting ready to go to 0-20 oils amsoil already has it but you are right about what you have read i worry more about the egr valve and torque converter than i do the engine have a nice day
  • HI ZOOMY,
    I checked my RPM's today...it really depends on when the CRD wants to change into high gear, but when it does it is....1750-1800 rpm at 55,60 & 62 mph......1850 rpm at 65 mph !!! that is in high gear plus i think they call it "lock-up" ??
  • faroutfarout Posts: 1,609
    Hamchanp: We received nothing as far as paper work, only a phone call from ISG. We started looking in the Advanced Search on Jeep.Com for the dealer y=that had what we wanted. Then we contacted the dealer who had what we wanted and asked if they would do a dealer trade. We explained our situation with the buy back and the dealer whom we bought the original Jeep with. The dealer was most agreeable, and we called our dealer from whom we bought our original jeep CRD from. He said ok and had to wait for the paper work from ISG. As near as I can recall after we heard from ISG it was about 7 days after that when we got the Compass. However, we are not totally settled yet. They took off .05 cents a mile from what was the MSRP, and that more than paid off the CRD, we had it financed. The dealer had to get a paid off certificate on the CRD before it is sent to ISG. After ISG gets the clear Title then we are all done. So far we are waiting for the paid off title. It could be another 2 weeks before it's all done. Our CRD was taken to some place that DCX wanted and then to the auction. We did get copies of everything that ISG sent, as we insisted that anything we signed we got copies of.

    Perhaps you need to talk to a higher up person at ISG? We really like the COMPASS! 25.1 mpg and it's so smooth. We have been treated very well, and we are blessed. Let us know how it turns out.

    farout
  • hamchamphamchamp Posts: 33
    Farout, Thanks for the response. Good news on the home front. Just got a call from ISG that they have been in touch with the dealer. If you remember, the dealer with the Jeep in a heap, and the dealer with the replacement veh. with the VIN # that was given to the district manager, couldn't agree on a dealer trade. I knew the replacement vehicle was in VA, and I looked it up on the internet, and gave that information to ISG. This dealership is about 60 miles from our house, and that is doable. It looks like it is finally moving along. I will keep in touch. Hamchamp
  • winter2winter2 Posts: 1,801
    I have been using the new "CJ" rated oil form Amsoil. It is a 5W-40 and I am very satisfied with it. I feel I would be putting the engine at risk by using the 5W-30 in spite of what you say. Most of the gassers you mention are using the 5W-20 to improve FE or operate variable cam or cylinder shut off schemes in their engines. Remember that gassers run at significantly lower compression than a diesel, so a heavier weight oil is not as crucial.
  • synlubessynlubes Posts: 184
    your answer is correct at the present time but the diesels are moving to lighter oils also manly for millage just like the gasser two or three years ago if you had mentioned a 5-40 oil for a diesel the diesel people would have screemd ten years ago strait thirty weight or forty weight with no fifteen -forty at all they said it was to thin watch the next year and you will see some five thirtys on the market diesels today start so quick the have to lubricate fast the only way is with synthetic oil or thin oils the europeans went to thin oils long before us manly the fifteen fortys and then the five fortys the are a head of us about five to ten years in lubrication but we are are catching up because of world engines that have to keep up with world market demands
  • nescosmonescosmo Posts: 453
    Synlubes... I do have the Jeep Liberty CD from 2004 to 2006 and in the 2004 they have the VM motori Liberty CRD and they recommend 10w-40 for the CRD for the 2.8 and 2.5 and now they recommend 5w-40. You are right. I am using the 5w-40 for now but when the supply that i have end i will go for the syn 15w-40 because there is no blow by and beside i live in a warm state.
  • synlubessynlubes Posts: 184
    i have customers that run the 15-40 and no problems like i have said in the past i think you could run molasses in that motor and not hurt it it is tough to muck american bull hanging on it egr etc
  • nescosmonescosmo Posts: 453
    Synlubes... Yes! If the engine is good for a Tractor in Italy, it should be excellent in my Libby.

    Nescosmo.
  • caribou1caribou1 Posts: 1,354
    I don't think you should make a direct comparison about the 2.8 CRD and a tractor. There are still older type diesel engines with less power offered on the EU market. Several friends are considering stepping back to get less trouble and smoother ride because of the extra difficulty when using the manual shifting. People complain that they stall too often when they start from standstill. Another aspect of this engine is that when the driver follows a conversation with his passengers on a fast portion of road, he often forgets to use the upper gear (6th in manual) because he needed the presence of torque a few seconds ago and this forced him to downshift. Down goes the mileage you paid for :sick:
  • synlubessynlubes Posts: 184
    be nice to have manual trannys over here we wouldn't have to worry about torque converters going out but there again we americans tend to be a little spoiled and dont like to shift maby that is why im overweight have a nice day
  • stbstb Posts: 31
    How do you calculate your fuel mileage (mpg)?

    I have a 2005 and the best I have gotten is 23mpg. Most fillups are 15 gallons or more traveling 300 to 330 miles. last fill up it took 15.7 gallons and I traveled 321 miles. This is the usual 20 to 22 mpg. Mostly highway driving with the cruise control set around 73mph at 2200rpm.
  • synlubessynlubes Posts: 184
    your millage and mine are about the same i have gotten twenty five for a high and eighteen for a low really hard to get a accurate fill up because os foaming of the diesel but we are pretty close to the same i dad a 2002 3.7 gasser about fifteen for a high but i drive about seventy most of the time
  • zoomy2zoomy2 Posts: 50
    thstranger

    I wouldn't think you would have any problems pulling the Casita and doubt you would see any difference in RPM.

    I'm still getting just over 20 mpg at 56-57 in 4th gear and around 16-17 in 5th at 65, I can live with this.

    Zoomy
  • winter2winter2 Posts: 1,801
    Until DCX and V.M. Motori clear their engines to run with a 5W-30 in the crankcase, I will continue to use either the 5W-40 or 15W-40 synthetic oils. I do not feel comfortable tempting the fates.
  • winter2winter2 Posts: 1,801
    That is kind of low FE in my view, but I tend to drive more gently. I get between 21 and 23 MPG when I commute and 28 and up on long trips. I generally keep the engine chugging along at about 1800 to 1900 RPM or about 62 MPH.
  • In a waiting room today. Motortrend magazine May 2007. Long story on fuels, motors, btu's, and mention of the gasoline compression engine. Any more news than the magazine?
  • faroutfarout Posts: 1,609
    crddude. The 20-23 mpg is what Motor Week got as an avrage for their long term test they had on their 2005 Jeep Limited CRD. For the 30,000 miles we owned our CRD the avrage came out to 21 mpg. The best we got was 25.4 the worst was 19. mpg. There are some who have said they got much better, I personally take their word for it.

    Farout
  • faroutfarout Posts: 1,609
    hamchamp: I am glad to hear that DCX is resolving this at last. We are to completely finish all the paper work on the buy back on may 1st. What's odd is we got the Compass on April 5th and it took 26 days to get the paper worked all done. Oh well this does take time.
    Have they reassembled your old CRD yet? They may not, and DCX may truck it to some place else to go to the auction. Ours went somewhere here in Missouri, and then to the auction. I won't ever own a diesel again. The US is geared to gasoline, and to brake out of the main stream into another type fuel is costly for the first buyers. I have resd DCX is only sending out a few CRD GC as there has been some issues that needed more work out time. I sure hope the ones that have good Liberty CRD's last well. I wish were one of that group.

    farout
  • nescosmonescosmo Posts: 453
    Hi Farout.... Hope that you like your Compass, tell me if it has the same power to pull your mobil home as the CRD.
    Sory to here about your case but my CRD works great. I use to put Chevron fuel and it used to run bad but ever since i put Sunnoco fuel, it run so smooth. Now all i do is clean the map sensor every 1k and bled the air out; Let me tell you it never been so good. I think that the ULSD fuel took care of the EGR valve issue, now it don't smoke only sometime when i clear it nose. Well i hope you are happy and please do not fade away. -YOU KNOW WE LOVE LOVE YOU-

    Nescosmo.
  • hamchamphamchamp Posts: 33
    Farout, Finally I have good news. We picked up a 2007 Dakota Quad Cab last evening. Still will have to wait for the paperwork, but that is always the case. The Dakota was about $1326.00 more than the Jeep, and we settled on paying $2500.00. The difference would be what was allowed for the mileage on the CRD. We felt that this was fair. We took your advise and asked for every paper that I had to sign, plus the paper that showed the deal that IGS made with the dealer. Kinda hard to interpret there figures but we were OK with the $2500.00 We did contact the attorney generals office and felt this was a help to us. The Jeep in a Heap is still at the dealers with the parts laying next to it. Now it has the paper sign in the window that it belongs to DCX. Thank you all for all your posting. You helped us through this waiting period. Good luck to all your CRDers.
    hamchamp :D
  • nescosmonescosmo Posts: 453
    Hamchamp.... Good life with your Dakota. I used to have a 1992 V6 with a tune in port engine it was the best. I hope you get good gas mileage with it, and that, was a good choice. My CRD is been very good with no problem for now; I think will keep it til it rust out, -love this machine- . The only complain that i had about the Dakota was the paint job, it was second class and DCX never paid for the bad job that they did on the pk truck, well please keep in touch.

    Nescosmo.
  • nescosmonescosmo Posts: 453
    Went to wally world and they are selling mobil 5w-40 now at a higher price than 5w-40 Rotella t. Now is Mobil better than Rotella, should i use Mobil or keep Rotella, is Mobil make the engine run smoother, with less noise. If any of you have made the change please let me know the diff.

    Nescosmo.
  • synlubessynlubes Posts: 184
    rotella will work fine not as good of oil but good enough
  • siberiasiberia Posts: 520
    Mobil make the engine run smoother?

    My CRD developed a ticky lifter using Mobil 1 5W40 that went away when I switched to Rotella 5W40 and has not returned. But, that may have been a random event that had nothing to do with the brand of oil. The main reason I switched to Rotella was price, availability and good enough.
  • siberiasiberia Posts: 520
    After 206 miles at 65 mph outside temp 70 F at stop:
    Engine oil temp = 170 F
    Transmission oil temp = 135 F
    Differential temp = 125 F

    After another 149 miles at 65 mph temp 84 F at stop:
    Engine oil temp = 170 F
    Transmission oil temp = 155 F
    Differential temp = 140 F
  • caribou1caribou1 Posts: 1,354
    Siberia,
    When you measure temperatures with an IR thermometer, be aware that two different materials (surfaces) will not give you the same proportional readings. You may have to put a spot of black matt paint (or IR reflective paint) where you take your measurement. All this to say the aluminium casting could be warmer than what you measured.
  • craigs1969craigs1969 Posts: 20
    Hi folks,

    My 06 CRD is due for the 30000 mile service. My questions are, 1. what has to be done and 2. must it be done by a dealership? This is the first car I've purchased new so I don't have any experience around this. Also, is there service that must be done to keep the warranty from being voided?

    thanks in advance for any responses.
    Craig
  • siberiasiberia Posts: 520
    When you think about it, Caribou1, you will know where I took the readings. The temperatures posted are in fact valid to the capabilities of the device. Indeed, temperatures read at the aluminum alloy castings were much lower than the proper readings posted.
  • winter2winter2 Posts: 1,801
    Craig,

    You do not need to go to the dealer for any servicing, unless you really want to. As long as the garage you use is reputable and warranties their work, that should be fine. Just be sure you keep your receipts in case there are issues later on.
  • jayriderjayrider Posts: 3,602
    Does anyone have any info on what a 30,000 service on a crd costs?
  • caribou1caribou1 Posts: 1,354
    If you reached both oil pans twice (under the truck) and have given a few minutes to allow the individual heat gradients to diminish, then I follow you. Heat exchangers (front radiators) when stacked will interact when you read their IR emission.
    The differential temperature should be proportional to the effort and time.
    I once drove from Spain to Switzerland (~500 miles) at a steady 80 mph. The original rear tires lost 30% of their rubber that day, but the engine and transmission seemed to enjoy it :shades:
    I've had 97,000 KM of pure pleasure so far.
  • synlubessynlubes Posts: 184
    you guys are way over my head but when i used to race sum we never bothered to worry abut oil temp just water is that wrong
  • caribou1caribou1 Posts: 1,354
    Synlubes,
    For a given displacement, modern engines are roughly 3 times more powerful than those you refer to. The counterpart to this will be more delicate care needed to preserve their performance.
  • siberiasiberia Posts: 520
    I don't think you are wrong, Synlubes. I think the oil temperature data that I posted from my CRD proves that you are probably correct with that perspective on the CRD as well. I took the temperature readings out of curiosity and shared them with the forum. Beyond that, I have no agenda.
  • siberiasiberia Posts: 520
    The differential temperature should be proportional to the effort and time.

    The data seems to indicate that the differential temperature is proportional to effort and ambient temperature in this instance. Time is more important when the effort exceeds the ability of the housing to dissipate heat.
  • caribou1caribou1 Posts: 1,354
    Here again, for the rear differential, the IR emissivity (ability to collect and absorb heat without any other means of contact besides ambient air) plays it's role. The cast iron differential is designed for that, as long as it is kept clean and people don't chrome plate it for looks. I once polished my motorcycle engine, and the result was disastrous!
    Usually, if you can't keep your hand near a differential (or gearbox) after a few hours of 'normal' running, you need to revisit the viscosity approach: either the oil film covering the gear teeth contact surfaces allows metal to metal friction or the lubricant is too thick (high viscosity). Our new high contact pressure multi grade synthetic oils make wonders here as long as you don't need the full effect of the differential locking mechanism when you have one. High contact pressure oil will fight against the mechanical parts needing to match under a fixed spring pressure.
  • synlubessynlubes Posts: 184
    you are right again chrome oil filters on motorcycles run about three degrees hotter
  • siberiasiberia Posts: 520
    Yes! You are right again, about diversionary information that has nothing to do with a simple man leisurely cruising a CRD down the highway on a beautiful spring day who stopped to smell the dandy lions and take a few simple temperature measurements.

    Here is a puzzler for you Caribou1 or anyone else:

    Initial tire pressures in all 4 tires were equal as possible without parallax. At the first stop, the tire temperatures were: RR=80, LR=85, LF=95 and RF=90 - rounded a bit. :surprise: Took multiple readings around the tires to eliminate surface variation which was minimal.

    I have an answer, you first.
  • jimhemijimhemi Posts: 223
    :lemon: Add me to the list.
    After all of this time by little CRD is letting me down. I love the little guy but it's now in the shop for the second time in 30 days.
    The first time it was in for two weeks as they replaced the ball joints and waited on parts to completely rebuild the trans.
    After driving it for a few weeks I have gotten a wicked shudder that many in here have complained about. Now I know what you were all talking about. With only 15,700 on an 2006 I never thought I would have these kind of issues, after all this was my first new vehicle ever purchased.
    The engine is strong, love the torque and fuel economy, but what they did with the transmissions and butting everything up leaves some to the imagination.
    So I get to thinking and seeing what so many in here have gone through considering we are only a small few who post here. What will this truck be like in 3 years without a warranty? So I called Chrysler yesterday to be on record. I have the Lemon Law sheet for my state printed out so all I really need to do is fill it out should this problem re occur. I just figured I would vent just a bit as this is one of the few groups of people that actually share in the passion of a little diesel.
  • anomiousanomious Posts: 170
    Hi! After getting the recalls, ball joints and TC, I had a horrible shudder and stalling... I found that the transmission was very low on fluid...After filling it, everything is great!

    I'm still having CCV problems. My hose from the turbo to the CAC is oily on the outside... Some food for thought! My XJ has a tiny orfice in the CCV system for blow-by gassed to pass through, I am thinking that the diesel has way too much flow and that the flow is pulling the oil through before it can settle out. Comments ??? :)

    Thanks! LK
  • jimhemijimhemi Posts: 223
    I wish I knew what all of that was, I have yet to take the plastic cover off the top of my engine. I'm the only maniac in here that changes his oil(Mobile One 5W-40) every 3,000+ miles according to the severe service requirements in the book.
  • tidestertidester Posts: 10,059
    I have an answer, you first.

    My first guess is that the front tires carry a heavier load and you made more right turns than left. :)

    tidester, host
    SUVs and Smart Shopper
  • caribou1caribou1 Posts: 1,354
    Siberia,
    I think free open minded discussions can help understanding. Have you experienced professional "brain storming"? Participants often discover new fields of interest, during their paid working hours. This gives them time to listen, like this forum in a certain way.

    Here are my thoughts about your question:
    I logged my tire wear during 35,000 miles to understand how the BFGs would behave. Every 5,000 miles I rotated the five wheels and identified them on a spreadsheet. The same applies for brake wear; it only takes a few minutes once the wheel is off.

    What did I notice?
    - My LR always had more wear than the 3 others that were in use. This makes me think the left side of the truck could slightly be out of balance due to the weight of the driver.

    When the roads are slippery, in 2WD my truck mainly spins on itself in the counter clockwise direction. The RR wheel should thus be more relaxed than the LR that's initiating the CCW twist. This could also be an explanation to more wear and heat on the LR wheel. This also occurs in right hand curves at 50 mph and more. The truck behaves like a crab on rainy days ;)

    The front wheels stand by the heat of the engine compartment. In addition to that, the engine and driver shift the center of gravity to the front. On a normal road in 2WD at stable speed, friction driven front wheels should accumulate more heat than the rear wheels that have better contact with the pavement.

    Usually air pressure will increase due to the amplitude of tire deformation / load being too important. If I remember correctly the specs, we should have 60% of the weight up front. This could also explain your situation.

    My tires have a load index of 107 (min value). I've not been able to detect different pressures, but they do ride harder than the original.
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