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A Mechanic's Life - Tales From Under the Hood

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  • Mr_ShiftrightMr_Shiftright CaliforniaPosts: 44,537
    hydrogen gas---remember the Hindenburg!

    Another good way to blow your face off is to apply a hi-amp fast charge to a completely discharged battery.

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  • srs_49srs_49 Posts: 1,394
    edited November 2012
    I'm wondering if the long road back to the battery will steal a fair amount of current away from that dinky charger. Sure, a heavy jumper cable, no problem, but pushing 1 amp through a 12 foot long connector cable might result in the charge taking a very long time

    Couple of things to consider. That "long road back to battery" has to be able to supply whatever the cranking current that's needed for the starter motor, with acceptable voltage drop, right? Whats typical cranking current? 50 amps? 100 amps? 200 amps? So that 12 foot cable from the battery to the engine compartment has to be able to pass that amount current with only a volt or two (or three) of drop. So the resistance has to be pretty small, say less than 20 milliohms for a 2V drop at 100 amps (from V=I*R).

    Now, what is the charging current fromr your charger? Say it's 10 amps. Through that same cable, you would drop 0.2V (10 amps * 20 milliohms), probably not enough to affect the charging of the battery.

    Just for reference, 10 ft of 8 gauge cable only has a resistance of .006 ohms (6 milliohms), less than the 20 milliohms I used in the above example.
  • thecardoc3thecardoc3 Posts: 1,521
    edited November 2012
    Lets start with the statement about pushing one amp of current through the cables. Whether they are 12", 12', or 12 miles, your statement set the condition that one amp of current is flowing. As the resistance of the conductor increases, the voltage applied to the circuit would also have to increase to maintain that one amp of current. The question then becomes how much more potential would be required for the extreme length of the cable? We could figure that out if we wanted to.

    Now back to the reality of the BMW. At 1 amp of current, that conductor's resistance would only create a voltage drop measurable at the most in the thousandths of a volt (it may be in the millionths, but we will use thousandths to keep the math simple). Easily negligible. Raise the current to ten amps, and your voltage drop is now ten times larger. Go up to 100 amps, and your voltage drop is another ten times larger, and is only now into the tenths of a volt range.
  • marsha7marsha7 Posts: 3,670
    It has been years since I was at Dad's shop (it closed in 1986)...the big lathe we had (6 foot bed) was a South Bend...the drum/disc lathes, I have no idea of the brand, but they stood about 4 feet tall, much larger than the units in service stations...

    We had a milling machine for warped cylinder heads, and we had a valve grinding machine to grind out the grooves in valves, and, boy, did they look beautiful and polished when we were done...

    We used the big lathe to grind down grooves on flywheels, beautiful smooth surface when we were done with them...also cut the copper on armatures so new brushes had full contact when starting...

    Life was different back then...
  • thecardoc3thecardoc3 Posts: 1,521
    About 8:30 I expect to hear from someone who called me last night right before the training class I was presenting started. Her car broke down last friday in the parking lot where she works. Then over the weekend she lost her keys. Its a 2003 Taurus and by her description she has had a lot of problems with this car in the two years that she has owned it. First a freind borrowed it, wrecked it that took a few months to be repaired. Then it wouldn't start a few months back so they replaced the battery, then when it didn't start again it got an alternator, and then someone else replaced the starter and now it's broke down again.

    She wanted it towed to the dealer, but everyone she called has said that with where it is sitting, they can't get to it. She has been told it has to go to the dealer because while they can make replacement keys, they have to program the PATS system to make them work.

    But, the car wouldn't start before she lost her keys. So this is now a minimum of two unique operations. She has already had what sounds like a half of a dozen attempts at fixing a fundemental issue without success, and she has managed to add an entire layer on top of that. I have up until 10am to solve every facet of this vehicle issue and then I have to hit the road for where I am teaching tonight.

    Does this sound like fun to you? Someone has to completely solve this and get the car to be reliable so that she can simply use it for a few years. Sometimes it's really dissapointing how we would have found and dealt with the primary problem months ago and yet we never got the chance. We can handle her theft deterrent retrain right in the parking lot where the car is at. I will have to open up the locked car, and if necessary I have tools that I can use to lift the car and roll it out of where it is at so that I can put it onto my flat bed.

    BTW, reflect for a moment the $$$$$ investment that we have in place, just to be "service ready" and solve this problem for her in an efficient manor.
  • Mr_ShiftrightMr_Shiftright CaliforniaPosts: 44,537
    This sounds more like the lyrics to a country western song. I might have hung up. :P

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  • xwesxxwesx Fairbanks, AlaskaPosts: 8,396
    edited November 2012
    Hahahahhaha; touche.

    I'm really curious as to what the problem is with the Taurus. After I sold my Escort, which was quite reliable for me, the lady that bought it said the alternator failed and then later that it "wouldn't start." I had replaced two failed alternators in the time I owned it (exactly one year apart from one another) and had recently replaced a failed starter. Aside from those, though, I had no issues with the car starting and had no reason to suspect it might act up at any time in the near future.

    Well, she ended up moving out of state and sold the car. Oddly, I happened to spot the car (with new owner) at a gas station about "five minutes" after he purchased it. I gave him some extra keys and a repair manual that had been toting around in my car for two months waiting for the other lady to pick up, and we chatted for a little while about the car's history. I noticed that the car did, indeed, have a new alternator, along with a new battery, but didn't see anything else that looked different from two months prior.

    I'm curious what the problem on this Taurus ends up being, as it sounds like maybe that could be the root cause of the Escort's issues, too. I could chalk one failed replacement alternator up to a poor rebuild, but two within only 2.5 years? It might be something more....
  • thecardoc3thecardoc3 Posts: 1,521
    I'm curious what the problem on this Taurus ends up being, as it sounds like maybe that could be the root cause of the Escort's issues, too. I could chalk one failed replacement alternator up to a poor rebuild, but two within only 2.5 years? It might be something more

    You cannot associate the problems that one car has to generate the repair answer for another. Your Escort may only have been suffering from substandard repair components, or a lack of proper testing and maybe there was never anything wrong with any of the alternators.

    As far as the Taurus goes, she was a no-show. On our way out of town I drove past it and saw where it is sitting. I can get it out of there, but only after hours when there are no-other cars in that driveway that serves as the parking lot that goes all the way around the building. My flatbed probably cannot make the turns at the corners without needing some of the yard, it's that tight. Add the other cars parked there and it won't fit, period.

    I asked if anyone wanted to guess what kind of investment it takes to be ready to do the whole job for her. The truck represents over $70,000 all by itself. The scan tool, and software licenses, oscilloscope etc. easily push the total over $100K.

    I am the only tech/shop that could handle her situation completely, with no outside assistance. The pressure to be too cheap has left everyone else short of everything that would be required, and this is a ten year old car. Think about that for a bit.
  • Mr_ShiftrightMr_Shiftright CaliforniaPosts: 44,537
    I'm surprised all your alarm bells didn't go off prior to even considering working on this car.... :P

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  • obyoneobyone Posts: 8,065
    Since you're talking about cost of the equipment to properly do a job let me ask you this. Do you ask for a down payment on any type of job or estimated cost of a job?

    For example say someone has '99 RX300 towed in to your shop and you estimate $13K to R/R a sludge motor. Guy tells you yeah go ahead and do it. Do you ask for a down payment? For what amount?
  • thecardoc3thecardoc3 Posts: 1,521
    On a repair of that magnatude, absolutely a deposit is required. They must pay the parts up front. There simply isn't a choice in ther matter because we don't have the kind of money that would allow me to buy an engine and sit on it for any length of time.

    The greatest fears with repairs like that is a customer who says do the work, and then never picks the car up. Worse yet since Pa doesn't have a mechanics lien law they could report the car as stolen, and when the police find it they take it away form us and return it to the customer without the repair being paid for. We are essentially left to sue for the repairs but the odds are we win the case but still never see a dime.

    I have had cars that the owner stopped making the payment on and get repo'ed that we had a repair waiting to be paid for. We have been ripped off for quite a sizeable amount of money that way through the years.
  • thecardoc3thecardoc3 Posts: 1,521
    I'm surprised all your alarm bells didn't go off prior to even considering working on this car

    Oh they were going off allright. The problem is we are so much about trying to help people that we often forge ahead no matter how rough the seas or dark the clouds are.
  • isellhondasisellhondas Issaquah WashingtonPosts: 17,628
    It's nice that you try so hard to help people but sometimes a shop just has to decline a job.

    " I appreciate the fact you called on us to do this job but I just don't feel comfortable doing this job when the cost of repairs will be more than the value of the car"
  • Mr_ShiftrightMr_Shiftright CaliforniaPosts: 44,537
    The buddhists have a term for that...it's called "unskilled generosity".

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  • thecardoc3thecardoc3 Posts: 1,521
    Spent some time trying to look that up, found lots and lots of stuff but nothing that I felt explained the concept.

    Ran into a guy this evening, really didn't know who he was but it didn't take too long and I realized it wasn't comfortable having a conversation with him.

    Eventually the conversation turned towards what I do for a living, he was instantly interested because he has an oler Corvette that he claims he wants to sell but the radio doesn't work. He thinks (suspects) that there is wiring damage caused by a rodent. He wanted me to go to where he has the car stored to check it out.

    Sorry, that's not how it works. I'll do remote diagnostics/repairs for another shop and may choose to do that for a long time customer, but not for someone that I just met.

    Well it turns out we had a dealing with him about eight years ago, and now that he knows who I am things changed a bit. Another shop brought a cadillac to me because of a TPMS issue. I'm not a tire shop, but having the tools to deal with TPMS simply was in line with my overall approach. Back then I was the only shop equipped to fully handle that "new" technology. They couldn't get the light to go out and though there was a problem with the car. I was slammed with work but made room for it.

    The only thing I found was the tires were over inflated, otherwise the system was working just fine. Inflating the tires correctly extinguished the light and warning on the car. (Spec 30psi, the tires were at 36psi)

    I recall the guy coming and picking up the car and being all irate. Heck all we did was confirm that the system was actually working correctly when it alerted for over-inflation as well as under-inflation. That was the first time we had seen a car do that. Back then there was no published proceedures for changing the pressure specs that the system looked for. It was basically set by the factory and beyond our reach. Today, some manufactuers do have ways for the tire pressure system to be updated for changes in tire pressure specs, but not back then.

    This guy still holds that against us. Combine that with his story changing several times until he realized that I actually recall that incident and I was glad that he never became "a customer" and got to tell him so. At one point he claimed he had to wait at my shop for three hours, and I had no problem pointing out that the tire store brought his car to me, and an hour later he picked it up. Then he tried to claim that we charged him too much, except he didn't pay anything because we only looked at it as a favor to the tire store. Then he claimed that "he fixed it himself", yea sure he did. His Caddy isn't on the list of cars that I know of for which we can do an update for the TPMS spec. Even then we have to go online and register (request) the spec change with the manufacturer, and they release the adjusted software to us, and then we do the reprograming.

    He's not a customer, at best he's a guy with a broken car and I hope he realizes that he's not welcome at my place.
  • Mr_ShiftrightMr_Shiftright CaliforniaPosts: 44,537
    edited November 2012
    Here's a little explanation of the Buddhist idea of (pardon the translation, these are not my words) "idiot generosity".

    I never thought I would apply Buddhism psychology to running an auto repair shop, but you know, it kinda WORKS! :surprise:

    IDIOT GENEROSITY

    Basically there is nothing 'mystical' about this advice seems to me---you could re-word it, change the Buddhist nun to a guy in a white shop coat, and publish it in an auto repair Trade Journal. It's about handling people while handling your own welfare.

    A repair shop owner is like one of those guys at a carnival in a cage hanging above a water tank---every customer is trying to hit the bulls-eye.

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  • isellhondasisellhondas Issaquah WashingtonPosts: 17,628
    There will always be a small percentage of customers you simply don't want. It's a small percentage but a business has to know when to tell these people to go elsewhere.

    These are the people who will blame a new scratch on the shop or tell you " It never leaked transmission fluid until you worked on the brakes...you MUST have done something"
  • thecardoc3thecardoc3 Posts: 1,521
    A repair shop owner is like one of those guys at a carnival in a cage hanging above a water tank---every customer is trying to hit the bulls-eye.

    We are fortunate to have a core group of customers who carry our shop year after year and they don't do the kinds of things that force us to split our concentration when it comes to servicing their vehicles. The ones who come in looking to take advantage of us cause us to have to keep looking over our shoulder to ward off the surprise complaint instead of getting to enjoy fixing their car. Even then, we usually get the task done perfectly, only to still see them unsatisfied.
  • thecardoc3thecardoc3 Posts: 1,521
    There will always be a small percentage of customers you simply don't want. It's a small percentage but a business has to know when to tell these people to go elsewhere.

    There are some businesses in this trade who cater to those people at a level that they reward them for acting like selfish spoiled brats. They still can't make them happy and at the same time teach them to try and take advantage of everyone they meet. That's exactly what the guy with the Cadillac did back then and even when he basically stole from us, it was in his eye's our fault.

    Frankly if he would have kept his mouth shut, I easily would have had him bring his Corvette in and repaired it for him. I don't recall names and faces and had easily forgot who he was. Yet I recall everything about individual repair events and the moment he mentioned his Cadillac it was total recall and I knew that he is poison.
  • andre1969andre1969 Posts: 21,902
    I have had cars that the owner stopped making the payment on and get repo'ed that we had a repair waiting to be paid for. We have been ripped off for quite a sizeable amount of money that way through the years.

    I think something along those lines happened to my previous mechanic. Back in December 2009, I noticed an '85 or older Buick Riviera sitting in their fenced-in back lot. A month or so later I noticed it was still there, and asked about it. The mechanic said it belonged to a woman who, after they did all the repairs (forget now what all was done), decided it was too much, didn't pay for it, so they kept the car.

    It's nearly three years later, and the last time I was in there, they STILL had the car! In fact, they still start it up every once in awhile to give it a run...which IMO is awfully nice of them.

    I wonder what would ultimately happen to a car like that? I'll confess to having a fascination of cars from that era, so the mechanic let me look at it one day. Too rough though, even for my tastes!

    I'm in Maryland, and have no idea what the laws are covering something like that.
  • Mr_ShiftrightMr_Shiftright CaliforniaPosts: 44,537
    oh the garage should have lien-saled the car long ago. They'll just being lazy about clearing up this problem I think.

    You get a "lien kit" from DMV and follow instructions. It's pretty easy. I've helped a few garaged do lien sales. I did the paperwork, placed the public notice and after the auction--which nobody ever comes to---I filed the lien papers for the garage. They got a title, sold the car to pay for the repairs*

    * Note: there are rules regarding how much a garage may charge for "storage" and also a rule that if the sale exceeds the cost of the repair bill, that extra money goes back to the owner of the car. Also, the owner can contest the lien sale, but if they contest it and still refuse to pay, and don't file a lawsuit, then the lien sale goes on.

    Threat of a lien sale is a good way to get non-payers to cough it up or shut up.

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  • isellhondasisellhondas Issaquah WashingtonPosts: 17,628
    edited November 2012
    Back in the mid 70's a buddy of mine was at a local transmission shop having some work done when he spotted the nices little 1952 Chevy Hardtop sitting behind the building. He wandered over and took a closer look. It was dusty and looked like it hadn't been run for awhile.

    So my friend asked about it and learned that they had overhauled the transmission (Powerglide) but the owner refused to pay for the job or pick up the car. They had just completed the Mechanic's Lein paperwork and told him he could buy it for the price of the rebuild which was, at the time, around 200.00!

    He picked me up, stopped by the bank and we went back and picked up the Chevy which they had washed in the meantime! It was a So. Calif beauty, rust free with something like 60,000 miles on it. I drove it home for him and it ran like a dream!

    He drove it for abut a year and finally sold it to a guy who kept bugging him for I think 600.00.

    It got lowered to the ground, split manifold installed and lived the rest if it's life as a "cholo wagon"
  • andre1969andre1969 Posts: 21,902
    edited November 2012
    I used to have a 1979 Chrysler Newport, that I bought from the junkyard in late 1996. In April 1997, the transmission failed on it. Luckily, less than a mile from a local transmission shop that had a good rep, so I had it towed there.

    The guy that owned the place told me that, if I had happened to come by there about 5-6 months earlier, I could've had that car for free! I didn't understand what he was saying at first, so he explained. Turned out, the previous owner had brought that car to them, and when they said it needed a new transmission, he didn't want to put the money into it, so he just left the car with them. They swapped the wheels, which were the extra-wide 15x7 road wheels, and gave them to a friend to use on a horse trailer, and they threw some junky Ford wheels on that had the same bolt pattern, but the center part was smaller so they cut the opening out. And eventually, they sent it to the junkyard.

    And as luck would have it, I happened in that junkyard on the very day the car came in, so I saw it, complete and solid, before they started dismantling it and then parting it out. Paid $250 for it.

    It actually drove out of the junkyard, and made the trip home just fine, and the transmission never gave any indication of trouble. And the inspection never found anything, but then again, I don't think a transmission is part of a "safety" inspection. However, one evening after work I used it for my part time job delivering pizzas, and it acted up pretty quickly. I tried to get it home so I could get another car, and got within about 1/4 mile. So I just left it along the road, ran home, got another car, and figured I'd deal with it later.

    That night, after I got off, I put some transmission fluid in it, and it went into gear just fine. So I made sure to just keep transmisison fluid with me. But, the second time, that didn't work! :blush:

    The transmission shop only charged me $650 to put in a rebuilt transmission, which seems cheap to me...too cheap to total a car over. But then, maybe the previous owner was just getting tired of the car. And, it did need other work. I bet that transmission shop is happy that the previous owner didn't say go ahead and fix it, and THEN refuse to pay! Also wondered if they thought I was an idiot for pulling it out of the junkyard and then paying to get it fixed?
  • thecardoc3thecardoc3 Posts: 1,521
    edited November 2012
    API is starting a licensing program to help make sure that the public gets the correct oil put into their cars.

    http://www.searchautoparts.com/motorage/aapex-coverage/motor-oil-matters-comes-b- - ack-market-more-focus?cid=95882

    Well that's great, but the reality is we don't make money changing oil and it is likely that it will always going to be a "loss leader". Now we get to pony up another $400 to be licensed to try and prove that we know how to correctly service someones car.
  • steverstever YooperlandPosts: 40,153
    "Those who are licensed will be put in an online directory for consumers, which can be used as an advertising tool."

    Such a deal. And if you don't pay the $400 a year, someone like that Marsha guy will claim you're incompetent when they sue the shop. :P

    Don't forget to top up the tank with some Top Tier gas.

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  • srs_49srs_49 Posts: 1,394
    edited November 2012
    Doesn't mean squat for those of us that change our own oil.
  • steverstever YooperlandPosts: 40,153
    edited November 2012
    Until the manufacturer tries to deny your warranty claim for doing your own maintenance "wrong".

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  • qbrozenqbrozen Posts: 17,205
    Of course, trying and succeeding are 2 very different things.

    '13 Stang GT; '86 Benz 300E; '98 Volvo S70; '12 Leaf; '14 Town&Country

  • steverstever YooperlandPosts: 40,153
    edited November 2012
    Lots of hassle in the meantime. Especially if you have to go get that Marsha guy to help you out. :D

    Even when you win, you lose.

    Sort of nice owning older cars that you couldn't even buy an extended warranty for. The trick now will be finding parts and mechanics who can work on them.

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