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Audi A6

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Comments

  • Hi All,

    The reason why i didn't say that I love it is because of the gas mileage. I've owned two BMW's in the past, a 1994 525I and a 2000 323CI. Both were fun as hell to drive, and I got lots of stares from them. But, I had a lot of maintenance issues with them. I spent over $10,000 to maintain the 525I for the 4 years I owned it and $3,000 on the 323CI for the 3 years I owned it, even though I had 3-year free schedule maintenance on it. I had too many problems with the cars and the dealership. I'm 30 years old, but I look like I'm 21, so sometimes the people at the dealership treated me like a boy. Many times I had to bring the cars in for the same problems. They said they fixed it, but when I bring it home, there would be the same problems the next day.
    So, I switched to an Audi A6. Why? I had heard that Audis were bad cars because of poor quality, poor resale value, and high maintenance cost. I talked to several Audi owners, and here is what I found out: 1) the quality has gotten much better since the 80's 2) they still have a poor resale value, but that doesn't really matter to me since I plan on keeping it--as long as I don't have many issues with it 3) there is a free 4-year or 50,000 miles free scheduled maintenance with the 2003 models 4) several of the owners tell me that they would not switch to any other German cars since owning an Audi.
    I've always liked they way German cars looked and drove, but I was afraid of getting another bad one. I looked at all the Japanese brands, but none of them made my heart sing like the german cars--at least in the $40,000 range. In my opinion, Mercedes are too expensive, BMW lost my business for those reasons above, Japanese looks too bland, and never mind an American car.
    I've had mine for two months, with 5000 miles on it already. I hope that it will last at least 5-6 years with no problems. If it does, Audi will earn my business for a long time. As always, drive safely.
  • markcincinnatimarkcincinnati Posts: 5,343
    I can hardly think of anything more dangerous than driving along at 120kph with a DVD playing on a screen that the driver can see.

    Why on earth would you want to have the TV screen on at speeds above 3 or 4 mph?

    I am fearless and the very thought scares me?!
  • ctorrey2ctorrey2 Posts: 17
    dwongswong -

    I'm shocked at the cost of repair for your two BMW's. I owned an '87 325e and a '91 535i. I put at least 60k miles on the 3 (120k at trade in)and 30k on the 5 (75k at trade in) and with the exception of exhaust, tires, brakes, and tune-ups/oil changes (believe it or not, the 3 still had it's original clutch at trade in), I didn't sink a penny into either of them. Even the routine maint wasn't excessive. Great cars! Too bad you had bad dealer experiences; the two I used were great, honest, and thorough.

    I have since owned a new '98 A4 2.8q and currently an '01 A6 4.2. Both had slight "opening night jitters", but were resolved by the dealer immediately and permanently. In almost five years of combined ownership, I have only paid for fuel and tire rotations/balancing. Of course they both were/are under the Audi Advantage plan. Scheduled maint notwithstanding, I have only made three unexpected dealer visits over the course of ownership for both Audis. Long story short, the normally aspirated Audi engines seem to be very durable and if you get a good one, it should be fairly resistant to problems. If at all possible, get your hands on an "Audi Assured" car with an extended warrantee. It's good insurance against catastrophic repairs. Good luck.
  • markcincinnatimarkcincinnati Posts: 5,343
    My ar has the 2.7T engine. It is a 2003, I have a stick shift -- the car is, in virtually every way I can describe -- the best Audi I have ever owned. Sure I wish I coulda had a V8 -- but even if they were avail at the time I got mine, there will be no 6spd manual and initally no 6 spd tip or CVT either.

    So, while I hardly think I am stuck with a 2.7T -- the thing is a screamer -- my dealer service manager told me that I should have 50,000 - 60,000 trouble free miles. Now I am not keeping the thing, at least I assume I will not be -- my wife told me so -- after the lease is up so I will never see 50,000+ miles.

    I have read about the "early" turbo engines and I have had several Audi turbos since 1987 -- and they have all been (engine wise) trouble free. The most trouble I seem to have with Audis always has been brake rotors that warp and brakes that in general seem about 92% what they should be even when they are perfect. My 1995 S6 had great brakes and this ar seems good too. The 2002 S6 I test drove had the best brakes of any car period.

    I would pay, if the option was available, for the S6 brakes on my next (or even current) Audi. Alas, from the factory, this just isn't an option.

    So, whats the problem with the current Audi turbo engines? Or was this a turbos are more complicated and therefore. . .kind of statement?
  • jrichar6jrichar6 Posts: 3
    I am looking into purchasing an Audi, and I am torn between gently used 2000 A6s (probably a 2.8)and new 1.8T A4s.

    Does anyone have strong opinions either way?
  • jgraveljgravel Posts: 54
    Hello everyone, I've only just recently started looking at the A6 so I thought I'd ask the experts for advice. I was wondering if the 2004 is going to be a big change from the 2003. Also, has the 2003 been deemed a "good" year from a quality standpoint?

    Thanks, Jay
  • markcincinnatimarkcincinnati Posts: 5,343
    Rumor mill says A6 will be "new" in 04.

    My 03 allroad is nearly perfect @ under 8K miles, that is.

    By this time on my 01 A6 4.2, I was on my third set of brake rotors, as I recall.
  • stmechstmech Posts: 19
    Just wanted to weigh in with my 10 month long experience with my 2002 3.0 A6 with the CVT transmission. (23,000 miles and counting.) I would choose the CVT over 4WD again. This in spite of the very snowy winter just endured (I live in hilly part of NJ). Good snow tires were up to the task.

    The CVT transmission is, in my opinion, the best automatic I have ever experienced. Nothing else compares to the response, smoothness, and acceleration. I believe fuel economy is also better than with a normal automatic - I get a touch under 30 at interstate speeds and 25.5 with long-term everyday driving. I cannot make a direct comparison, but that seems quite good for this car. The "manual" mode has six identified ratios and in this mode it shifts quickly and solidly - more than the auto-stick units I have experienced. This is not far from a real manual in that regard.

    A Quatro with the CVT would be the best, but, like I said before, I would choose the CVT over 4WD if the choice must be made.
  • WOW - I have a 2002 A6 2.7T - according to the trip computer, I have gotten 17.6 since I bought the car - 6,600 miles ago. This is around town, freeway, no long trips.
  • hcaganhcagan Posts: 15
    Has anybody gotten a good deal on either a 2.7T or 3.0 lease lately ? I am about to come off my 2.7T lease within the next few weeks and have started to shop around the cost of a new A6. I'm looking for a 36/39 month, 15,000 deal A6 with Premium package, cold weather & Bose. I have not seen any marketing support on the car in the northeast. Your input would be appreciated.
  • markcincinnatimarkcincinnati Posts: 5,343
    Audi, not alone in this regard, has seen its car sales suffer somewhat due to the economy, Iraq, etc etc. There are deals -- ask the dealer, ask AoA. They will -- or at least they should -- clue you in as to the current promos and owner loyalty stuff that is, as I type this, going on -- probably as soon as April rolls around (1 day to go), there will be some new deals.

    Some of the deasl are indeed, posted on the usa website -- check it out.

    Also, my dealer claims that many dealers have a bit too much inventory, so if you can buy off the lot, you may find a bit of a sharper pencil.

    Good Luck!
  • cubanaudicubanaudi Posts: 17
    Can anyone help? I have a 2000 A6 2.7T. I had two problem free years with my car, and since the new year, I have had to take the car in three times with my "Check Engine" light on. I can't really remember what they did the first time, but 12 hours after picking up the car at the dealer, the light came on again. The second time, they replaced one spark plug. 12 hours later, the light came on again. I picked it up again this morning. They replaced the O-run valves. Whatever that is. Then, on the way back from my office today, bam!, the light is on again. Everytime it had come on, the car drives fine, and it still drives fine. Has anyone had a similar problem that they have had fixed? Personally, I think it is an electronic problem, but with my car coming off warranty in a few months, I do not want to be resposible for this problem. I have my car three months off warranty before I have to return it. Can anyone help? It would be greatly appreciated.
  • grshotgrshot Posts: 1
    I went to buy an '03 2.7T today and was suprised to learn that you can't get a mult-function steering wheel! It's standard on the 3.0. Does anyone know if it will be offered on the '04 2.7T? Can the dealer install a MF steering wheel? Is there a major body change planned for the '04 A6?
  • noshonosho Posts: 119
    I've had check engine light before - twice... first was Mass Air Flow sensor. Replaced and fixed first time with no repeat problem. Second was an oxygen sensor, replaced and fixed first time with no repeat problem.

    One note - the MAF sensor would light on cold morning and not other-wise.

    Sorry not to be of more help....
  • markcincinnatimarkcincinnati Posts: 5,343
    The 2004 A6 is supposed to be "all new" -- who knows what will and will not be avail. I would say that it is likely that there will be more standard and optional features than the current models, new options and perhaps new features that are not today avail at any price (from the factory), and perhaps even some engine transmission combinations that we can only hope for, like CVT with quattro, 6spd tiptronics, and more electronic gizmos and "toys."

    So, the reason to get a new A6 today is your call.

    There will be a new sherrif in town in a few months. The good news is that may make the 2003's plummit in price as the 04 day dawns. Or, Audi will do what it has done before -- it will hold the new cars in port until a threshhold minimum of 03's remain in dealer inventory.

    If you want the latest and greatest, wait. If you get an 03 A6 of any flavor, you will have a very nice car, indeed.

    What is the value, in dollars and time, of instant gratification?, that, perhaps, is the main quesiton you must answer.
  • merc1merc1 Posts: 6,081
    I think the new A6 will debut at Frankfurt this fall and come here next spring as an 05' model, just my guess.

    M
  • ctorrey2ctorrey2 Posts: 17
    merc1, based on the speculation on other A6 boards, 2005 seems to be about right for the new A6. The new S4, A8, and TT 3.2 arrive here in a few months as 2004 models and I believe the new A6 is next up after that. Hopefully it will more closely resemble the A8 rather than some of the "over-the-top" designs I've been seeing - IMHO.
  • m4d_cowm4d_cow Posts: 1,491
    Hi guys,
    I got another question here. I've been thinking for months about which one I should get, an 03' A4 3.0 with all options or 03' A6 3.0 w premium and cold weather package (both quattro), and I still cant make up my mind. I'm not sure which one is better for me, since both cars looks cool (dunno which ones better for my age, under 25). And obviously I dont wanna spend the rest of the time going through all the car's problems. If anyone can help plz gimme a reply or send it to [email protected] Thanx
  • JBaumgartJBaumgart Posts: 890
    I guess if I were 25 - especially if no kids - I would get the loaded A4 because it's a little sportier and handles a little better. But some people, even if just 25, prefer a smoother ride and the additional room that the A6 would provide, especially if you routinely take friends or business associates along with you. It's definitely a better highway car on long trips, whereas the A4 is more fun around town and on twisty roads, especially with a manual transmission if that's a possibility for you.

    The A4's design is also a little fresher, while the A6 has been around for 5-6 years now and is due for a major facelift. If I was in the market looking at these two choices, I'd also consider an Audi Assured A6 2.7T or 4.2, very lightly used but with full warranty.
  • For [email protected]

    I got my 2003 A6 quattro automatic with premium, Bose sounds, and cold weather package on Feb. 1. Since then I've put about 5,500 miles on the car, and I'm still in love with mine. It drives great for a "sedan-size" car. My wife and I love the heated seat in cold weather. The upgraded Bose sounds great.
    I've heard many Audi owners complain about the many a problems they've had in theirs, but so far, mine drives great with no issues (knock on wood). I've own many cars since I got my driver's license, but none has made me as happy as this car--so far. These are the vehicles I've had since I was 16 (in order when i got them): Nissan 240SX, Nissan Maxima, Jeep Grand Cherokee Limited, BMW 525i, BMW 323Ci, and BMW 328Ci. Except for the two Nissans, I've had problems with all my other vehicles. The Jeep had to get a new transmission. The 525i had to get a new engine. The 323Ci had to replace the amplifier, passenger speaker, cracked wood,and new cd player. The 328Ci got some trimming replaced--twice, a new radiator thermostat, cracked wood, and a new VANOS intake system.
    I will never buy another BMW again. The service man told me that BMW is not a luxury car. It's a world class sprinter with a luxury price. If you want a car that last longer than 50,000 miles get a Japanese, because BMW cars will usually have a problem with them by the time you get to 35,000-40,000 miles. He even went as far to tell me that unless you have money to burn or plan on trading it in every time it runs out of warranty, don't get one.
    The reasons I got an Audi are because, it's roomy (I carry people often), huge trunk, strong engine, beautiful style, all-wheel drive safety, free 4 year/50,000 maintenance, I got a great trade-in value on my 323Ci, and paid $500 over invoice on it.
    I don't know if you can get such a great deal on yours, but here is how I got mine. I waited until near the end of the month--a time when dealers are trying to close the month with as many car sales as possible, usually to meet or exceed quotas. Managers usually get bonuses on the numbers of vehicles sold, so they are willing to do a lot to get a car sold.
    By the way, I'm 30 if that helps you any. Oh, I also drove the A4, but wasn't that impress with it. It's tight in the back seat. I didn't like the plastic lower body panels. The dealer wanted $1,500 over invoice. Get one now, Audi is offering 1.9% financing for 60 months. Good luck! Always drive safely.
  • cdnpinheadcdnpinhead Forest Lakes, AZPosts: 4,597
    Your quote: "He even went as far to tell me that unless you have money to burn or plan on trading it in every time it runs out of warranty, don't get one." is remarkably similar (some would say identical) to the king of posters on this thread.

    He will identify himself in due course.

    The amusing thing is that he makes the same statement about. . .Audis.

    Go figure.
  • scirocco22scirocco22 Posts: 721
    *laughs out loud while typing* I was thinking the same thing while reading Mr. Wong's post but you beat me pointing it out, Steve!

    --'rocco
  • cdnpinheadcdnpinhead Forest Lakes, AZPosts: 4,597
    I've really enjoyed Audis when I've rented them in Europe. They are fine and enjoyable automobiles. OTOH, I tend to buy my cars and keep them a long time.

    I will continue to rent (and enjoy) Audis.

    It'll be awhile before one is parked at my home.
  • cmike1cmike1 Posts: 6
    Hi there,
    I have a chance to buy a 97 A6 wagon with low miles (65k) and in excellent shape for around 11,000. The consumer reports site did not have data avaialble for this model year, and I wanted to get any feedback from any of you that might know a lot about this model. Please, please tell me questions I should specifically ask about this car in case there are any notorious things I should be watching out for or any bits of information I should ask about. How are the maintenance costs? I do not know if it is a quattro or not yet. The edmunds.com editorial review says they are very slow - is this an accurate assessment? Is it noticeable when trying to accelerate on the highway - is it a major issue? What about the long-lasting mechanical quality - can i expect this to last another 100,000 miles with usual maintenance, assuming that the car has been maticulously maintained to this point? Please let me know - thanks for any help you can offer - I sincerely appreciate it!!!
  • ctorrey2ctorrey2 Posts: 17
    The '98 - '02 A6's (current generation) were available with the 2.8 liter engine and many complained that it was very sluggish. The previous generation A6 (and 100/200) models ('97 and under) also utlized a version of the 2.8 liter engine. Unfortunately, it was even less powerful. I think you will find that in addition to it's performance deficit, repairs costs can be eyepopping. Quattro is great and the previous generation A6 is, in my opinion, still a looker. I guess it's "buyer beware". Check out the model guide section of Audiworld.com for specs on the car. Also, there is a forum for previous generation A6's and the people on these boards are very accomodating.

    Good luck!
  • markcincinnatimarkcincinnati Posts: 5,343
    The 2.8 liter engine was, I think, 172 HP in 1997, and the torque was, as I recall, under 200 pound feet probably around 3,000 RPM. The car would run at high speeds all day long but it would take a pretty long runway to get up to speed. Modifications of any substance were not readily available since the engine was non turbo.

    Audis are expensive to repair. If the car is a quattro and is in good shape, I would think you would enjoy the car other than the low power from a dead stop.

    The price is right.

    Please understand that most of us on this board have had at least one Audi -- or so it seems as this is an Audi enthusiasts town hall. Also know that "eyepopping" expenses out of warranty for maintenance AND repair are fairly routine.

    Also know that there are certainly plenty of folks who have had a good long term experience with their cars (Audis in this case).

    This is a buyer beware situation, as was already noted.

    Good luck. Is there any aftermarket warranty available -- and at this milage do you know when the timing chain was changed last, if ever?
  • kirby2010kirby2010 Posts: 136
    It will be interesting to see what happens with the new A-6: style, options, etc. I had a 2003 A-6 2.7T w/auto for a loaner recently and I didn't like it too much. My 2001 (A-6 2.7T w/6-speed) is a much more comfortable car. I am not a big fan of the sport suspension and I missed the controls in the steering wheel. I hope that the 2004 and beyond go back to the mix of interiors and options that were available in 2001. I'll be looking again in 2005 or so.

    Still very happy with the choice I made. 31K miles so far. Finally a warranty repair (not excited about it - just making the announcement) and a couple recalls. Dealership is excellent to deal with.
  • Mark raises some excellent points in his argument that at this point in time with low interest rates/strong dealer incentives (lease subventions?)/weak resale values/and warranty considerations that the smart way to go is to lease, rather than buy, a new German sedan.

    There is one additional consideration that I don't think has been raised which could reverse the way the argument is going. With certain car lines, one can buy a certified used car and get a longer warranty than the new car. I think that a BMW Certified car has a warranty out to 100,000 miles. So, the best of all worlds would be to couple this longer warranty with 30% off MSRP price. Here's how: let the original buyer take the hit on the first year depreciation and then you, the certified buyer, pay a lot less for the car and get a longer warranty! This would work really well on a car model or line that has a weak resale value(e. g., a BMW 7 series or Saab, any Saab). In that case a certified buyer could save some serious money.

    Since depreciation is the biggest expense in new car ownership , this strategy would give the car buyer the lowest cost of ownership yet still allow him to drive a (almost) new car with a longer than new warranty.

    Incidentally, when we talk about resale values I wonder what we mean? Everyone "knows" that the resale is high on a Mercedes and BMW. Everyone "knows" it is low on a Saab or a Chevy Tahoe. But, this might be an overstatement of the case. Most Mercedes and BMWs are sold close to or at the MSRP. Lots of other car lines are heavily discounted. No one, repeat no one, pays list for a Saab. But if we compute resale base not on the fractional value a used car retains from list price but from actual purchase price, maybe the German cars aren't that high in resale value and the American cars aren't that bad? The problem with this apples to apples comparison is the difficulty in collecting the actual purchase price data. Measuring resale as a percent of the Moroney is easy. But misleading.
  • leifleif Posts: 41
    most certified cars are 2 yrs. or 100,000 miles, whichever occurs first.
  • merc1merc1 Posts: 6,081
    Since you're the resident Audi expert. What do you think of a 2001 A6 2.7t (16K mi) for 33K? It's Audi Certified and all. Thanks.

    M
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