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  • iluvmysephia1iluvmysephia1 Alamogordo, NMPosts: 7,615
    edited August 2018
    Hey, guys, would you think a removal of cookies here on the Edmunds site using my desktop might help me get logged in? Any thoughts or opinions on that? Did it help any of you ta do that?

    2011 Kia Soul Sport 5-speed

  • thebeanthebean Parts UnknownPosts: 1,125
    edited August 2018


    andres3 said:

    I'm just curious, is anything ever your fault?

    Absolutely. I take blame when blame is due. Like when I was a teenager and rear-ended somebody at about 5 MPH; thankfully there was no visible damage. My car had a damaged license plate and that's about it. I suppose the license plate frame showed plastic stress "coloring" from being compressed.

    I'm still thinking the photos show more of a "side" impact than they do my rear going into her. The damage clearly shows fast motion from the right to the left. Not from being compressed inward.

    By the description of the damage to her vehicle she had to be behind you or just almost so when you started backing out. Otherwise how would you have damaged her car doors. If you were at least 3/4ths of the way out and she came by and hit you her damage would have been far more towards the front. based on where you say her damage was I would tend to believe your insurance company did the right thing.
    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Not necessarily. If she didn't see him backing out due to distraction, she could have easily have run into his corner as he was far out of the parking spot. I know we tend to disbelieve @andres3 because of his love of speed, but I'm kind of on his side here, looking at things objectively.
    2015 Honda Accord EX, 2017 Honda Civic EX-T
  • fintailfintail Posts: 48,082
    edited August 2018
    I'd rather back into a virtually guaranteed to be empty spot rather than a random crapshoot parking lane. It's also a mild test of skill. Pull forward opportunities seem rare, at least in my area. In my workplace garage, there are nearly zero.

    Insurance companies aren't charities, they will do what they can to maximize profit, there's little oversight and even less recourse.

    I think not looking can parallel with speed - if people looked, they might go slower or not whip around blind corners etc. My dashcams have a fairly wide field of vision. You should look into it, if I lived in your area, I would. I don't see myself ever moving away from having it, both for peace of mind and the chance of catching some wacky weird event.
    andres3 said:

    fintail said:

    Dashcams (front and rear), and always back into spots whenever possible. I see so many witless idiots zooming around parking lots like they are normal roads.

    OK, so I'm trying to avoid this ever happening again, and the idea of backing into spots did come up. I do fail to see how it helps much, as with both methods, you are backing either out of or into a space at least once.

    Only an empty parking lot where you can pull froward into the space in the adjacent lane that your facing forward improves this. I suppose your backing INTO a space rather than OUT Of one, but the mere act of backing up makes you vulnerable to being deemed at-fault should anyone ram into you. I want to avoid reverse gear.

    My father was recently hit by a Toyota driver while he was reversing and parallel parking INTO a parking space. The Toyota driver decided he was taking too long apparently, and rammed directly into his front left side that was still sticking out as he was backing into the space. Even in this case, where he was basically rear-ended to the front left side, the mere act of backing up made him 50% at fault according to his insurance company.

    He probably should have fought harder, but I understand giving up.
  • driver100driver100 Burlington, ON 7 mo/Tampa FL 5 moPosts: 24,768

    If you have your laptop in CA with you, can you try to get on there?

    No, the laptop is in Florida. I use it there as my main computer. I have my desktop and tablet (for travel and ebooks) in Canada.

    2017 MB E400 , 2015 MB GLK350, 2014 MB C250

  • driver100driver100 Burlington, ON 7 mo/Tampa FL 5 moPosts: 24,768
    edited August 2018
    Sorry to hear about your mishap Andre.
    Most articles on the subject say backing into a space is much safer than trying to back out of a parking space.
    This is one article

    Here is a summary.
    “Needless to say, back-in parking takes more time and effort than head-in parking. Yet, it is easier, quicker, and safer when exiting. Thus we may conjecture that people take the trouble to back in demonstrate the ability to delay gratification; they want to invest more time and effort now so they can enjoy the fruits of their labor later. They demonstrate a culture of long-term orientation.”
    This is the main difference:
    Backing out of a parking space means going out into unknown and changing traffic. A driver’s view is further hindered by the cars parked next to it. The other cars are directly in the driver’s blind spots.

    2017 MB E400 , 2015 MB GLK350, 2014 MB C250

  • ab348ab348 Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, CanadaPosts: 10,879

    Hey, guys, would you think a removal of cookies here on the Edmunds site using my desktop might help me get logged in? Any thoughts or opinions on that? Did it help any of you ta do that?

    I did it somewhat in desperation. I was able to log in afterwards but don't know if that was the reason or if it was something else.

    If you are seeing the old forums login page with the "Hello Stranger" message on it, you should not be seeing that so maybe that is related to cookies.

    2017 Cadillac ATS Performance Premium 3.6, 1968 Oldsmobile Cutlass S Holiday Coupe

  • andres3andres3 Southern CAPosts: 10,961
    edited August 2018


    andres3 said:

    I'm just curious, is anything ever your fault?

    Absolutely. I take blame when blame is due. Like when I was a teenager and rear-ended somebody at about 5 MPH; thankfully there was no visible damage. My car had a damaged license plate and that's about it. I suppose the license plate frame showed plastic stress "coloring" from being compressed.

    I'm still thinking the photos show more of a "side" impact than they do my rear going into her. The damage clearly shows fast motion from the right to the left. Not from being compressed inward.

    By the description of the damage to her vehicle she had to be behind you or just almost so when you started backing out. Otherwise how would you have damaged her car doors. If you were at least 3/4ths of the way out and she came by and hit you her damage would have been far more towards the front. based on where you say her damage was I would tend to believe your insurance company did the right thing.

    It certainly appears that way, but the problem is I hadn't "just started backing out." I was backing out for quite some time already before colliding with her. She was no where near me when I started backing out. Want to do the math on how many feet of distance you cover at 20 MPH (admittedly a guess at her speed) over let's say, 5 seconds? She came from very far away to hit me the way she did. She was not in the proper right lane. I don't think she tried to swerve to avoid me which only leaves two possibilities:

    1) She sought out to hit me as I was backing out, and aimed for just behind me.

    2) She was in the middle or center left of the two narrow lanes in the parking lot, and not in her proper travel lane. If she was driving on the proper side of the travel lane of the parking lot, she would have hit my doors, instead of vice versa.

    3) She was most definitely carrying some speed, I'm pretty sure my guessitimate of 20 is good +/- 5 MPH. At 1 MPH, no one that is parked should be able to hit the front half of the side of your vehicle. That tends to show the coast was not clear IMO. If your back half is hit, that favors the woman. I think insurance companies just look at who was moving and who reached the point of impact first. Since she was going 15 to 20X faster than me, she got there first, but I most definitely had to "pull back in" after getting out of my car, because it was in the way, precisely as I've remembered and described the events.

    Unfortunately for me, there were several people nearby, but they did not see what happened, they only looked after hearing the sound of a collision, but they were in the parking lot very close by, too bad! I definitely asked them if they saw what she did because an eye witness would have been helpful.
    '16 Audi TTS quattro 2.0T, '15 Audi A4 quattro 2.0T, '19 VW Tiguan SEL 4-Motion AWD
  • explorerx4explorerx4 Central CTPosts: 13,744
    Rear cross traffic alert.
    2017 Ford Fusion SE 2017 Ford F-150 Limited
  • andres3andres3 Southern CAPosts: 10,961
    edited August 2018
    driver100 said:

    Sorry to hear about your mishap Andre.
    Most articles on the subject say backing into a space is much safer than trying to back out of a parking space.
    This is one article

    Here is a summary.
    “Needless to say, back-in parking takes more time and effort than head-in parking. Yet, it is easier, quicker, and safer when exiting. Thus we may conjecture that people take the trouble to back in demonstrate the ability to delay gratification; they want to invest more time and effort now so they can enjoy the fruits of their labor later. They demonstrate a culture of long-term orientation.”
    This is the main difference:
    Backing out of a parking space means going out into unknown and changing traffic. A driver’s view is further hindered by the cars parked next to it. The other cars are directly in the driver’s blind spots.

    I sort of see the logic, just a small benefit I think. Even so, I think I will start doing it, at least a majority of the time.

    The problem is in my recent example, the parking lot for the restaurant was shaped sort of like the letter "P"
    I was facing where the loop meets the center of the straight line. I was backing out in a straight line, because the travel lane from the looping portion of the P was behind me, so I could back out for several car lengths if I had wanted to. The coast behind me was indeed clear, I wasn't backing out into the unknown, but I'll have to really watch my sides for much longer now. I won't assume other drivers are idiots, I'll assume I'm invisible I guess.

    I see the same vulnerabilities when backing into a space on arrival, until your protected by cars on all sides.
    '16 Audi TTS quattro 2.0T, '15 Audi A4 quattro 2.0T, '19 VW Tiguan SEL 4-Motion AWD
  • stickguystickguy Posts: 33,344

    Rear cross traffic alert.

    Bingo. I love mine. very helpful, especially when stuck in a small car between big trucks!

    And this story is also why I park as far out as possible and hoof it in. That, and to stay far away from shopping carts. plus exercise is good for you!

    2019 Acura TLX A-spec 4 cyl. (mine), and 2013 Acura RDX AWD (wife's)

  • Mr_ShiftrightMr_Shiftright Sonoma, CaliforniaPosts: 64,490

    Buy a motorcycle.

    Ya mean motorsickles don't have reverse gears?  :p

    Honda Gold Wing has had an electric reverse for years. Some sidecar bikes have a gear-driven reverse but driving a motorcycle in reverse is most definitely a sure way to crash.
  • andres3andres3 Southern CAPosts: 10,961

    Rear cross traffic alert.

    @stickguy

    What do you think the range is on rear cross traffic alert though? Will it warn you about someone far away gaining fast on you? If you are backing out slowly, it takes some time to get 3/4 of the way out, and then your a sitting duck.
    '16 Audi TTS quattro 2.0T, '15 Audi A4 quattro 2.0T, '19 VW Tiguan SEL 4-Motion AWD
  • snakeweaselsnakeweasel a Certified Edmunds Poster.Posts: 15,478
    Buy a motorcycle.

    Ya mean motorsickles don't have reverse gears?  :p
    Mine does, it's called my feet.

    2008 Sebring Ragtop, 2011 Hyundai Sonata, 2015 Honda CTX700D

  • abacomikeabacomike South FloridaPosts: 10,494
    stickguy said:
    Rear cross traffic alert.
    Bingo. I love mine. very helpful, especially when stuck in a small car between big trucks! And this story is also why I park as far out as possible and hoof it in. That, and to stay far away from shopping carts. plus exercise is good for you.
    No question about it - front and rear cross traffic alert systems are great.  Coupled with those features, my car stops/brakes if it senses an imminent collision with front or rear cross traffic.  Same for pedestrians - it alerts and automatically stops the car if there is an imminent collision sensed.

    The system uses cameras and sensors on both left and right front and rear bumpers.  I can’t tell you how many times in the past 9 months it has saved me from hitting a car or a pedestrian.

    2018 Mercedes S450

  • snakeweaselsnakeweasel a Certified Edmunds Poster.Posts: 15,478
    thebean said:
    andres3 said:
    I'm just curious, is anything ever your fault?
    Absolutely. I take blame when blame is due. Like when I was a teenager and rear-ended somebody at about 5 MPH; thankfully there was no visible damage. My car had a damaged license plate and that's about it. I suppose the license plate frame showed plastic stress "coloring" from being compressed. I'm still thinking the photos show more of a "side" impact than they do my rear going into her. The damage clearly shows fast motion from the right to the left. Not from being compressed inward.
    By the description of the damage to her vehicle she had to be behind you or just almost so when you started backing out. Otherwise how would you have damaged her car doors. If you were at least 3/4ths of the way out and she came by and hit you her damage would have been far more towards the front. based on where you say her damage was I would tend to believe your insurance company did the right thing.
    ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Not necessarily. If she didn't see him backing out due to distraction, she could have easily have run into his corner as he was far out of the parking spot. I know we tend to disbelieve @andres3 because of his love of speed, but I'm kind of on his side here, looking at things objectively.
    Not so sure, if he was out as far as he said he was and she was inattentive she would have struck him damaging her front end. 

    2008 Sebring Ragtop, 2011 Hyundai Sonata, 2015 Honda CTX700D

  • stickguystickguy Posts: 33,344
    andres3 said:

    Rear cross traffic alert.

    @stickguy

    What do you think the range is on rear cross traffic alert though? Will it warn you about someone far away gaining fast on you? If you are backing out slowly, it takes some time to get 3/4 of the way out, and then your a sitting duck.
    depends I think on the angle the car is coming at. If it makes a sharp turn you get less notice. But based on backing out of my driveway, with cars coming down the road at normal speed (say 25-30), with a clearer view it gives a pretty good heads up.

    2019 Acura TLX A-spec 4 cyl. (mine), and 2013 Acura RDX AWD (wife's)

  • andres3andres3 Southern CAPosts: 10,961


    thebean said:


    andres3 said:

    I'm just curious, is anything ever your fault?

    Absolutely. I take blame when blame is due. Like when I was a teenager and rear-ended somebody at about 5 MPH; thankfully there was no visible damage. My car had a damaged license plate and that's about it. I suppose the license plate frame showed plastic stress "coloring" from being compressed.

    I'm still thinking the photos show more of a "side" impact than they do my rear going into her. The damage clearly shows fast motion from the right to the left. Not from being compressed inward.

    By the description of the damage to her vehicle she had to be behind you or just almost so when you started backing out. Otherwise how would you have damaged her car doors. If you were at least 3/4ths of the way out and she came by and hit you her damage would have been far more towards the front. based on where you say her damage was I would tend to believe your insurance company did the right thing.
    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Not necessarily. If she didn't see him backing out due to distraction, she could have easily have run into his corner as he was far out of the parking spot. I know we tend to disbelieve @andres3 because of his love of speed, but I'm kind of on his side here, looking at things objectively.

    Not so sure, if he was out as far as he said he was and she was inattentive she would have struck him damaging her front end. 

    You keep assuming she was in her proper lane. If she's distracted it's not much of a jump to put her anywhere between the two rows of parked cars.
    '16 Audi TTS quattro 2.0T, '15 Audi A4 quattro 2.0T, '19 VW Tiguan SEL 4-Motion AWD
  • abacomikeabacomike South FloridaPosts: 10,494
    When backing out of a parking space or a driveway, if you hit a pedestrian or another car, the fault is yours.  Sure, there is often contributory negligence on the part of a pedestrian or car driver for not reacting appropriately to your car backing up, but try to prove contributory negligence in those cases.  Unless you have 2-3 witnesses who observed that the pedestrian was purposely walking into your car or that the car driver was texting at the time of the accident, the preponderance of fault is attributed to the driver backing out of the parking space.

    My cross traffic alert and braking system reacts in milliseconds- if I don’t brake quickly enough, the car will.

    2018 Mercedes S450

  • andres3andres3 Southern CAPosts: 10,961
    abacomike said:

    When backing out of a parking space or a driveway, if you hit a pedestrian or another car, the fault is yours.  Sure, there is often contributory negligence on the part of a pedestrian or car driver for not reacting appropriately to your car backing up, but try to prove contributory negligence in those cases.  Unless you have 2-3 witnesses who observed that the pedestrian was purposely walking into your car or that the car driver was texting at the time of the accident, the preponderance of fault is attributed to the driver backing out of the parking space.

    My cross traffic alert and braking system reacts in milliseconds- if I don’t brake quickly enough, the car will.

    Do you think braking to a stop milliseconds before impact would save you completely? They could argue your already in the way of their travel lane, and they just couldn't stop in time. Being stopped helps, because be definition you are no longer backing up, you are on more equal footing then, but, I could still see you getting 50% blame in such a case. Even better would be a system that could floor the throttle for a split second and put you in forward gear a;; at the same time to shoot forward about 10' as fast as possible; moving you out of harms way.
    '16 Audi TTS quattro 2.0T, '15 Audi A4 quattro 2.0T, '19 VW Tiguan SEL 4-Motion AWD
  • suydamsuydam Posts: 4,110
    It’s a great warning system. Especially in crowded malls. Will it stop every accident? No. But it sure helps you avoid a lot of trouble.
    '14 Buick Encore Convenience
    '17 Chevy Volt Premiere
  • snakeweaselsnakeweasel a Certified Edmunds Poster.Posts: 15,478
    andres3 said:
    andres3 said:
    I'm just curious, is anything ever your fault?
    Absolutely. I take blame when blame is due. Like when I was a teenager and rear-ended somebody at about 5 MPH; thankfully there was no visible damage. My car had a damaged license plate and that's about it. I suppose the license plate frame showed plastic stress "coloring" from being compressed. I'm still thinking the photos show more of a "side" impact than they do my rear going into her. The damage clearly shows fast motion from the right to the left. Not from being compressed inward.
    By the description of the damage to her vehicle she had to be behind you or just almost so when you started backing out. Otherwise how would you have damaged her car doors. If you were at least 3/4ths of the way out and she came by and hit you her damage would have been far more towards the front. based on where you say her damage was I would tend to believe your insurance company did the right thing.
    It certainly appears that way, but the problem is I hadn't "just started backing out." I was backing out for quite some time already before colliding with her. She was no where near me when I started backing out. Want to do the math on how many feet of distance you cover at 20 MPH (admittedly a guess at her speed) over let's say, 5 seconds? She came from very far away to hit me the way she did. She was not in the proper right lane. I don't think she tried to swerve to avoid me which only leaves two possibilities: 1) She sought out to hit me as I was backing out, and aimed for just behind me. 2) She was in the middle or center left of the two narrow lanes in the parking lot, and not in her proper travel lane. If she was driving on the proper side of the travel lane of the parking lot, she would have hit my doors, instead of vice versa. 3) She was most definitely carrying some speed, I'm pretty sure my guessitimate of 20 is good +/- 5 MPH. At 1 MPH, no one that is parked should be able to hit the front half of the side of your vehicle. That tends to show the coast was not clear IMO. If your back half is hit, that favors the woman. I think insurance companies just look at who was moving and who reached the point of impact first. Since she was going 15 to 20X faster than me, she got there first, but I most definitely had to "pull back in" after getting out of my car, because it was in the way, precisely as I've remembered and described the events. Unfortunately for me, there were several people nearby, but they did not see what happened, they only looked after hearing the sound of a collision, but they were in the parking lot very close by, too bad! I definitely asked them if they saw what she did because an eye witness would have been helpful.
    The problem is if she didnt swerve then you hit her as you were backing out plain and simple, otherwise her damage would have been on her front end. Seeing that your contact with that other car is at the front door tells me that you backed into her as she was passing you. 

    Now at 1 MPH you would be traveling at about a foot and a half or so a second. this means you would travel between at least 2 to 3 feet into her path before she could have even touched the brakes. Add that to the stopping distance it is easy to see that you may have not seen her when you started to back up.

    I would really like to hear her side of the story. But by your description of the damage there is not much I can come up with. 

    2008 Sebring Ragtop, 2011 Hyundai Sonata, 2015 Honda CTX700D

  • abacomikeabacomike South FloridaPosts: 10,494
    andres3 said:
    When backing out of a parking space or a driveway, if you hit a pedestrian or another car, the fault is yours.  Sure, there is often contributory negligence on the part of a pedestrian or car driver for not reacting appropriately to your car backing up, but try to prove contributory negligence in those cases.  Unless you have 2-3 witnesses who observed that the pedestrian was purposely walking into your car or that the car driver was texting at the time of the accident, the preponderance of fault is attributed to the driver backing out of the parking space.

    My cross traffic alert and braking system reacts in milliseconds- if I don’t brake quickly enough, the car will.
    Do you think braking to a stop milliseconds before impact would save you completely? They could argue your already in the way of their travel lane, and they just couldn't stop in time. Being stopped helps, because be definition you are no longer backing up, you are on more equal footing then, but, I could still see you getting 50% blame in such a case. Even better would be a system that could floor the throttle for a split second and put you in forward gear a;; at the same time to shoot forward about 10' as fast as possible; moving you out of harms way.
    I am not attempting to describe “at fault” blame in my several posts.  My car stops - period!  If you had my cross traffic/pedestrian system on your car, you would not have hit that woman’s car.  She might have hit you - but you wouldn’t have hit her - like you did.

    Just accept the fact that you backed into her while she was driving legally.  

    2018 Mercedes S450

  • imidazol97imidazol97 Crossroads of America I70 & I75 Posts: 23,613
    Years ago my wife and a Honda tangled in a parking lot. She was backing out slowly and he turned into her from the parallel drive so that her right rear bumper and his right rear door met. It seemed like the thin Honda metal was damaged a whole lot more than the slight bumper scrape on the LeSabre. The insurance companies each paid for their own car since both cars were moving. Police do not respond unless there's an injury.

    2015 Cruze 2LT, 2014 Malibu 2LT, 2008 Cobalt 2LT

  • andres3andres3 Southern CAPosts: 10,961


    andres3 said:


    andres3 said:

    I'm just curious, is anything ever your fault?

    Absolutely. I take blame when blame is due. Like when I was a teenager and rear-ended somebody at about 5 MPH; thankfully there was no visible damage. My car had a damaged license plate and that's about it. I suppose the license plate frame showed plastic stress "coloring" from being compressed.

    I'm still thinking the photos show more of a "side" impact than they do my rear going into her. The damage clearly shows fast motion from the right to the left. Not from being compressed inward.

    By the description of the damage to her vehicle she had to be behind you or just almost so when you started backing out. Otherwise how would you have damaged her car doors. If you were at least 3/4ths of the way out and she came by and hit you her damage would have been far more towards the front. based on where you say her damage was I would tend to believe your insurance company did the right thing.
    It certainly appears that way, but the problem is I hadn't "just started backing out." I was backing out for quite some time already before colliding with her. She was no where near me when I started backing out. Want to do the math on how many feet of distance you cover at 20 MPH (admittedly a guess at her speed) over let's say, 5 seconds? She came from very far away to hit me the way she did. She was not in the proper right lane. I don't think she tried to swerve to avoid me which only leaves two possibilities:

    1) She sought out to hit me as I was backing out, and aimed for just behind me.

    2) She was in the middle or center left of the two narrow lanes in the parking lot, and not in her proper travel lane. If she was driving on the proper side of the travel lane of the parking lot, she would have hit my doors, instead of vice versa.

    3) She was most definitely carrying some speed, I'm pretty sure my guessitimate of 20 is good +/- 5 MPH. At 1 MPH, no one that is parked should be able to hit the front half of the side of your vehicle. That tends to show the coast was not clear IMO. If your back half is hit, that favors the woman. I think insurance companies just look at who was moving and who reached the point of impact first. Since she was going 15 to 20X faster than me, she got there first, but I most definitely had to "pull back in" after getting out of my car, because it was in the way, precisely as I've remembered and described the events.

    Unfortunately for me, there were several people nearby, but they did not see what happened, they only looked after hearing the sound of a collision, but they were in the parking lot very close by, too bad! I definitely asked them if they saw what she did because an eye witness would have been helpful.

    The problem is if she didnt swerve then you hit her as you were backing out plain and simple, otherwise her damage would have been on her front end. Seeing that your contact with that other car is at the front door tells me that you backed into her as she was passing you. 

    Now at 1 MPH you would be traveling at about a foot and a half or so a second. this means you would travel between at least 2 to 3 feet into her path before she could have even touched the brakes. Add that to the stopping distance it is easy to see that you may have not seen her when you started to back up.

    I would really like to hear her side of the story. But by your description of the damage there is not much I can come up with. 


    She managed to sneak her front end behind me "just in time" for me to back into her. Hence the damage to my right corner despite backing out straight. This is the essence of your argument and what I think ultimately won her case for her, the fact is I was still moving rearward when she got behind me.

    Saying she's a terrible driver for allowing her car to be hit by a car moving 1 MPH for over 5 seconds at a constant speed and direction, is a true statement, but it doesn't change fault in the eyes of insurance company.

    She was equally as bad or as good as a completely blind driver, and just happened to have gotten lucky with her position and timing. I was easily about 10' into the path of travel before I was hit, but since I was still moving, you can technically say we hit each other, and she had the right of way.

    At the point where I was hit I was so far back I actually was well past the point of "letting my guard down" regarding side impacts, and was merely looking directly behind me. Anyone with 2 working eyeballs that was actually actively using them would not have impacted my vehicle, of that I'm 100% certain.
    '16 Audi TTS quattro 2.0T, '15 Audi A4 quattro 2.0T, '19 VW Tiguan SEL 4-Motion AWD
  • tbirdmarcotbirdmarco new yorkPosts: 3,838


  • andres3andres3 Southern CAPosts: 10,961
    edited August 2018
    abacomike said:


    andres3 said:

    abacomike said:

    When backing out of a parking space or a driveway, if you hit a pedestrian or another car, the fault is yours.  Sure, there is often contributory negligence on the part of a pedestrian or car driver for not reacting appropriately to your car backing up, but try to prove contributory negligence in those cases.  Unless you have 2-3 witnesses who observed that the pedestrian was purposely walking into your car or that the car driver was texting at the time of the accident, the preponderance of fault is attributed to the driver backing out of the parking space.

    My cross traffic alert and braking system reacts in milliseconds- if I don’t brake quickly enough, the car will.

    Do you think braking to a stop milliseconds before impact would save you completely? They could argue your already in the way of their travel lane, and they just couldn't stop in time. Being stopped helps, because be definition you are no longer backing up, you are on more equal footing then, but, I could still see you getting 50% blame in such a case. Even better would be a system that could floor the throttle for a split second and put you in forward gear a;; at the same time to shoot forward about 10' as fast as possible; moving you out of harms way.

    I am not attempting to describe “at fault” blame in my several posts.  My car stops - period!  If you had my cross traffic/pedestrian system on your car, you would not have hit that woman’s car.  She might have hit you - but you wouldn’t have hit her - like you did.

    Just accept the fact that you backed into her while she was driving legally.  

    Let me fix your statement so that it makes sense:

    "Just accept the fact that you backed into her while she was driving with right of way precedence legally.

    Now I get why old fuddy duddies don't like fast drivers. You're afraid you could get blamed when someone going 100 hits you doing 10 MPH, or in my case, approximately 20 MPH vs. my 1-2 MPH.

    Simple physics should make it easy for a car moving 10 to 20X faster to avoid one moving 10 to 20 times slower!

    Particularly at parking lot speeds, how long should one reasonably take to react to a backing out vehicle? Seems like a sure-fire way to inspire insurance fraud. If I wanted to commit insurance fraud, now I know how. Just target a vehicle backing out of a parking space, and make sure you fly by with just inches to spare to make it seem like they backed into you!



    '16 Audi TTS quattro 2.0T, '15 Audi A4 quattro 2.0T, '19 VW Tiguan SEL 4-Motion AWD
  • explorerx4explorerx4 Central CTPosts: 13,744
    @abacomike,
    Consider it a lesson learned. There is a saying "Don't feed the troll".
    2017 Ford Fusion SE 2017 Ford F-150 Limited
  • andres3andres3 Southern CAPosts: 10,961
    I just think the rule of thumb for parking lots should be changed to:

    1. Front half of the side of your car gets backed into (forward moving car's fault assuming both are moving).

    2. Back half of the side of your car gets backed into (backing up car's fault assuming both are moving).

    Of course, most of the time when you back out you are turning; this was a rare case.

    At least it was the VW and not the Audi :open_mouth:

    '16 Audi TTS quattro 2.0T, '15 Audi A4 quattro 2.0T, '19 VW Tiguan SEL 4-Motion AWD
  • abacomikeabacomike South FloridaPosts: 10,494
    @abacomike, Consider it a lesson learned. There is a saying "Don't feed the troll".
    At least we aren’t involved in speeding tickets, lawyers, traffic court, speeders and red light cameras!  It’s still no blessing in disguise.  :D

    2018 Mercedes S450

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