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Trade in/sell my 2013 Outback Limited for a 2008 Outback?

subarusforlifesubarusforlife Posts: 2
edited June 2015 in Subaru
Thanks for reading - I have a 2013 Outback with approx 40k miles. There is a 2008 outback 68k miles that I was looking at. I can afford my 2013 car payments but I'd really like to save some money. I'll take the 2008 outback to my local mechanic. It is listed for $12,999.
Should I sell my outback myself and buy the 2008? I'd hate to save money just to turn around and spends lots of $ on repairs for the '08, I had a 2005 outback that lasted 225k miles that I traded in when I got my 2013. Only thing is I love my '13 body style.
Any suggestions are appreciated!

Comments

  • MichaellMichaell ColoradoPosts: 121,524

    Thanks for reading - I have a 2013 Outback with approx 40k miles. There is a 2008 outback 68k miles that I was looking at. I can afford my 2013 car payments but I'd really like to save some money. I'll take the 2008 outback to my local mechanic. It is listed for $12,999.
    Should I sell my outback myself and buy the 2008? I'd hate to save money just to turn around and spends lots of $ on repairs for the '08, I had a 2005 outback that lasted 225k miles that I traded in when I got my 2013. Only thing is I love my '13 body style.
    Any suggestions are appreciated!

    It's a classic case of the "devil you know" ... I assume you bought your '13 new, so you know how it's been maintained. Can't say the same of the '08, can you?

    I'm not advocating any specific course of action, just getting you to think beyond just the financial aspect of this.

    I'll get some Subaru experts to chime in as well....

    Did you get a good deal? Be sure to come back and let us know! Post a pic of your new purchase or lease!


    MODERATOR

    2015 Subaru Outback 3.6R / 2014 MINI Countryman S ALL4

  • fezofezo Manahawkin, NJPosts: 10,376
    Me? I'd keep the 13. But I'm not the one with the car. My answer is more to my own tendencies. YMMV.
    2015 Mazda 6 Grand Touring, 2014 Mazda 3 Sport Hatchback, 1999 Mazda Miata 2004 Toyota Camry LE, 1999.
  • nyccarguynyccarguy Stamford, CTPosts: 13,380
    Stick with the 2013

    2001 Prelude Type SH, 2015 Infiniti Q40 AWD, 2017 Honda Pilot Touring AWD

  • Mr_ShiftrightMr_Shiftright Sonoma, CaliforniaPosts: 64,490
    I agree. Stick with the 2013. Buying an older Subaru without knowing the exact details of maintenance is risky, as the 2.5L engine is prone to head gasket failure.
  • xwesxxwesx Fairbanks, AlaskaPosts: 13,085
    edited June 2015
    Interesting scenario, SFL! I find myself getting into these same conundrums from time to time... :D

    I certainly can't blame you for considering going from a gen-4 Outback to a gen-3 as far as the looks of the vehicle go! The 10-14 Outbacks are just so darn ugly (as opposed to the 05-09 generation, which was a real stunner). But.... then there's the whole issue of interior space and long-term engine reliability, in which the gen-4 wins hands-down!

    So, you have quite a decision to make. I'm not sure whether you had to replace head gaskets on your '05 that went to 225K, but, if you didn't, then count yourself fortunate! You may not have the same fortune with the '08. 68,000 miles are few enough that the problem, if present, may not be fully manifested. So have your mechanic check that aspect quite carefully. A used oil analysis may not be out of the question here (just to check for fractional presence of coolant in the oil) if you really want to hedge your bets. Also, consider that at 68K the car probably needs new struts but the OEMs may not be "gone enough" to really seem bad right now.

    On the one hand, you will save funds out of pocket (e.g., no more loan on the '13 and, depending on your equity, maybe even walk away with cash in your pocket). On the other hand, you do have to consider that you lose 28,000 miles (not many, all things considered), space, and a warranty.

    If you play it right, this is a good financial decision. You will save money, even in the long term, unless that '08 turns out to be a lemon.
    2014 Audi Q7 TDI, 2008 and 2013 Subaru Forester(s), 1969 Chevrolet C20 Pickup, 1969 Ford Econoline 100, 1976 Ford F250 Pickup
  • xwesxxwesx Fairbanks, AlaskaPosts: 13,085
    edited June 2015
    As an aside, I recently sold my 2011 Ford Fiesta and replaced it with a 2008 Subaru Forester that the PO rolled a few months ago (yep, you read that right!). So far, I'm not regretting that change in the least bit, despite putting some $ into it to get it back to my standards. Mechanically, it was in pretty solid condition when I bought it.

    So, your thought process isn't an unprecedented sort of crazy. :p
    2014 Audi Q7 TDI, 2008 and 2013 Subaru Forester(s), 1969 Chevrolet C20 Pickup, 1969 Ford Econoline 100, 1976 Ford F250 Pickup
  • kyfdxkyfdx Everywhere, USAPosts: 128,067
    Also.. run the numbers and see if your payment will actually go down.

    You might find that with the 2008, you'll have a shorter term and higher interest rate.. yes, cheaper over time, but it might not help your cash flow (and, as noted, all of the potential repair bills).

    Did you get a good deal? Be sure to come back and share!

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  • xwesxxwesx Fairbanks, AlaskaPosts: 13,085
    kyfdx said:

    Also.. run the numbers and see if your payment will actually go down.

    You might find that with the 2008, you'll have a shorter term and higher interest rate.. yes, cheaper over time, but it might not help your cash flow (and, as noted, all of the potential repair bills).

    Good point. I assume an out-of-pocket purchase. :D

    2014 Audi Q7 TDI, 2008 and 2013 Subaru Forester(s), 1969 Chevrolet C20 Pickup, 1969 Ford Econoline 100, 1976 Ford F250 Pickup
  • Thanks for your comments. I don't know much about cars. Did just buy Auto Repair for Dummies so I can gain a very basic understanding of cars :smile:
  • qbrozenqbrozen Posts: 26,096
    Ok, well, let's start at the top: That's just stupid money for an '08. $10k is more than enough.

    For your '13, you'd be looking at $22k to maybe $23k private party.

    1. Selling a $20k+ car private party is difficult enough, then add on the fact that you owe money on it and it is simply a headache.
    2. You have paid tax on your 2013 that you are flushing down the toilet, then paying tax again on the '08. Take that into consideration.

    So, possibly half the money for a car that's 3 times the age. I guess I could see the argument either way. I'd also like to point out that the timing belt service has likely not been done on the '08 because it hasn't hit the required mileage yet; however, I'm a strong believer in not letting it go past 5 years, regardless of miles. You are trusting your engine to a piece of rubber, after all. The interval calls for 105k miles or 8 years, anyway, so its almost due by anybody's calculation.

    '10 Equinox LS; '08 Charger R/T Daytona; '67 Coronet R/T; '14 Town&Country Limited; '18 BMW X2. 49-car history and counting!

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