Toyota TACOMA vs Ford RANGER - VIII

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Comments

  • allknowingallknowing Member Posts: 866
    I'm tired and almost agreed to anything. The more I think about it, no way would only changing the shocks enable the Ranger to maneuver like the TRD Tacoma. It's not just bounce. The TRD Tacoma has a much more solid and controllable feel to it than the Ranger. You can bring up the cross members etc., and I really don't know the dynamics of why it is, but the Ranger is harder to control in rough areas. As far as your submerging the exhaust comment, I think that a skillful driver knows that it's stupid to chance submerging your exhaust, rpm's up or not. You'd have to be pretty ignorant to even try it if you didn't have to.
  • modvptnlmodvptnl Member Posts: 1,352
    Please explain what is detrimental about your exhaust being under water. Most boats run there exhaust through the prop or through the transom under water(mine) When launching said boat on shallow ramps I've had all my trucks exhaust happily burbling away under water with no problem ever. I'd be a lot more worried about trans, axle and transfer case venting then my exhaust.
  • allknowingallknowing Member Posts: 866
    I'll rehash one more of my past comments. After I got through the 1,000 mile break-in on my Toyota, I took a trail that I had attempted to take a few months earlier in our Ford. The Ford was so hard to control in this area, and we were getting thrashed around so much (even going slow)that we didn't make the 6 miles or so to a waterfall I wanted to see. I'll admit that we could have made it, though with difficulty, but my wife was getting pretty annoyed. The Toyota, in contrast, handled the trail superbly and I defy anyone to try and tell me that the difference between the two vehicles is close enough to be a simple preference. If you want to take tough areas in the most comfortable fashion possible, there's no comparison. Changing the shocks ain't going get you there in the Ranger. We've rehashed the same things over and over in this forum and It seems pretty clear to me that the TRD Tacoma has proved to be a superior off road vehicle and generally a higher quality vehicle than the Ranger. Maybe with the Ranger's changes next year that will change but for now it hasn't. You're beating a dead horse trying to prove otherwise. Even your favorite mag. Consumer Reports rates the Tacoma better than the Ranger every year. The Ranger may be rated "Best Buy" by C. R. but the Tacoma is still rated better by the same magazine. How much longer are we going to go over the same points only to see the Ranger as an above average truck, but the Tacoma still the best small truck?
  • allknowingallknowing Member Posts: 866
    If you're speaking of an outboard you're taking about a 2 cycle engine. Your truck engine isn't designed for the back pressure caused by submerging the exhaust and your cylinders will not be able to get rid of the burnt fuel-air mixture. You could cause a major backfire, simply stall your engine underwater(which will not restart until the exhaust is removed from the water) because the cylinders are filled with exhaust gasses rather than new air-fuel mix, you could possibly blow a gasket, or even suck water into the engine when it stalls causing lots of trouble. The fact that your truck's exhaust is burbling away as you put it, shows that the exhaust is not completely submerged. Even if your boat engine is a 4 cycle engine, if the exhaust exits under water, then the engine characteristics have been designed for the extra back pressure. Your truck engine isn't.
  • spoogspoog Member Posts: 1,224
    "How much longer are we going
    to go over the same points only to see the Ranger
    as an above average truck, but the Tacoma still the
    best small truck? "



    That is one darn good question.

    It has BEEN proven over and over, again and again tha the Tacoma has:

    a. better offroading ability
    b. better reliability
    c. better resale value
    d. better performance

    What are the sources?

    The NAtional Highway and Safety Institute, Consumer Reports, 4wheeler magazine, Petersons offroad magazine


    Cspounser:

    In order for the Ranger to approach the offroad level of the tacoma it will need:


    a. a brand new suspension
    b. better shocks
    c. better ground clearance
    d. standard skid and fuel tank plates
    e. a locking rear diff
    f. better steering
  • spoogspoog Member Posts: 1,224
    http://www.fourwheeler.com/newtrucks/ptoty/98/ptoty1.html

    Following in the footsteps of its close relative, the '98 Ranger adopted many of the mechanical modifications incorporated into the Explorer two years earlier. Among the biggest changes include an entirely new double A-arm front suspension with light-duty torsion bars. The new IFS, combined with an all-new rack-and-pinion steering setup (which offers its own steering fluid cooler), won high praises from our testers over our 800-mile test. Specifically, the Ranger scor ed well in Highway Performance categories that centered around maneuverability and long-distance cruising. Testers noted the new steering proved especially quick to react in tight-chicane situations. No doubt about it: This new Ranger out-handles, out-ste ers and out-corners any Ranger before. By a mile.


    We would characterize the drivetrain, specifically the transmission, as biased for highway performance as well. All 4.0-liter Rangers (and Mazdas, for that matter) ordered without the manual tranny get the first five-speed automatic transmission offer ed for any pickup. Our testers split over the need and/or usefulness of a mileage-biased transmission geared for empty-load flatland running. Those in favor noted the nearly seamless transitions from one gear to the next, and how the transmission itself c ould, if the vehicle was driven right--no jackrabbit leadfoot starts--tack on another 50,000 miles of life to the engine.

    On the trail, we found the automatic transmission to be a double-edged sword. The smoothness of the First-to-Second shift, combined with the inherent low-end grunt of the engine, was almost enough to overcome the taller gearing. And in the end, voting followed individual preferences for manuals versus automatics. Two testers noted both the manual transmissions (Mazda and Toyota) felt more "in control" on the twisty low-range trails of Truckhaven, where face-down compression braking was very helpful o n steep-trail crawling. In low-range, our automatic Ranger offered a rather delicate 22.8:1 crawl ratio (First x axle gear x low-range); the Mazda and Toyota offered 34.4:1 and 40.4:1 gearing, respectively.


    Likewise, where the stiffened front suspension cleanly handled all paved-road obstacles thrown in its path, the Ford IFS had trouble keeping up with the broken terrain of dry washes, hill climbs, and washboards. Admittedly, it is a rare vehicle that c an manage all the extremes with equal aplomb, but several testers commented that the Ford liked to spring a little bit quicker (and hop higher) off the rolling whoop-de-doos. For the most part, we found the sacrificed off-highway capability to be greater than the gained on-highway performance, and for that reason it didn't score well in the parts of our test that are most heavily-weighted; however, that isn't to say testers weren't squabbling among themselves to get into the Ranger for the highway drives up the mountain.

    Finally, testers showed their traditional colors by not favoring the dash-mounted rotary dial ("looks a lot like an A/C control--and no Neutral") of the Borg-Warner 44-05 electronic transfer case. The 44-05 never gave us a lick of trouble--we submerge d the gearboxes under freezing water, as well as subjecting them to high-heat, dust-blasted wash runs--and by going to a dial, floor space opens up, but our scorers' preference is for a lever-actuated system, or anything with a Neutral position, regardles s of the floor space it takes up.

    Like any good four wheeler, we found the Ford Ranger could do several things quite well, scoring highly in On-Road Ride and Handling and Interior Comfort. To us, the new Ranger is a nice-looking, comfortable truck that is easy to drive and easy to own . And it's made in plants with a reputation for quality. But the Pickup Truck of the Year has to do it all pretty damn well, and it has to be great off-highway. And so we introduce our 1998 winner:
  • spoogspoog Member Posts: 1,224
    http://www.fourwheeler.com/newtrucks/ptoty/98/ptoty.html

    WINNER: TOYOTA TACOMA TRD



    Although the compact Tacoma XtraCab itself is not completely new, the Toyota Racing Development (TRD) suspension and locking rear differential package is. The TRD Off-Road Package offers oversized fender flares, alloy wheels, 31-inch tires, Bilstein shocks, slightly softer spring rates, and an electromechanical, button-actuated rear locking differential, all for $1,690.

    Our Surfside Green test unit came with the 3.4-liter, dual-overhead cam, 24-valve engine and five-speed manual transmission. The Tacoma came factory-equipped with the lowest axle gears of the test: 4.10:1. It was this combination of excellent gearing (First gear for the factory five-speed is 3.83:1) that made testers comment about how readily the Tacoma jumped off the line. In fact, during track testing, the Tacoma was substantially faster than the others, both loaded and unloaded (see page 30). Tract ion came courtesy of a more aggressive tread in the 31x10.50 Goodyear Wrangler three-stage GSA. We found it supplied surprisingly good cornering power on pavement, with plenty of potential for aired-down trail running.
    As well as the Tacoma performed on the track, it was on the trail where the premium import seemed most comfortable. Best-in-class ground clearance, the most aggressive tread of the bunch, and a crawl ratio of better than 40:1 made the Tacoma everyone' s choice for hill climbs and steep backside descents. Even our resident auto-tranny diehards had to admit that the lively throttle response, sure-grip clutch, and built-to-work gearing meshed together as well as any championship-caliber team. In each perf ormance-related category of our test, the Toyota won.




    It's not often that our collection of testers agree on anything (in fact, never), but this year's Pickup Truck of the Year was a unanimous decision. Praises relating to the TRD suspension mentioned its ability to control rutted, seriously choppy terra in better than any other vehicle we'd driven. One tester went so far as to note that during a few moments of an effortless dry-wash run, it seemed the spirit of Ivan Stewart had taken over his body. This is a truck that can go slow or go fast, on pavement or off.

    Ultimately, in addition to a strong engine, good tires, and supremely tuned suspension, the clutch defeat switch (the only one in a truck sold in the US.), lever-operated transfer case, and pushbutton locking rear differential were the icing on a toug h-truck cake. Although you have to pay a premium for a premium package, the TRD Tacoma, dollar for dollar, is the best on- and off-highway compact package (maybe of any truck) we've seen. This truck has features the others just don't offer, and they all w ork. And that's why it's our 1998 Pickup Truck of the Year.
  • spoogspoog Member Posts: 1,224
    http://www.fourwheeler.com/newtrucks/ptoty/98/tech.html


    Ford's 4.0-liter overhead-valve V-6 gave our Regular Cab Ranger plenty of off-the-line motivation with 168 lb.-ft. of rear-wheel torque at 2500 rpm. Mazda's 3.0-liter/five-speed manual transmission gave the Regular Cab B-truck the slowest 0-60 time, but the best fuel economy of the group. Although the middle-sized V-6 of the group, the Toyota 3.4-liter DOHC 24-valve V-6 pulled all the way through the torque curve like most small-blocks.

    The Ford five-lug 8.8-inch rearend comes standard with the 4.0-lite/five-speed auto combo. Leaf springs and 3.73:1 axle gears are rated to carry 1,180 pounds. Mazda's 7.5-inch rearend is standard with the 3.0-liter V-6. Not surprisingly, our ride-quality vastly improved with 12 bags of landscape rock in the compact's bed.
    Toyota's TRD Tacoma comes with the only factory offered rear locking differential on any (full-size or compact) pickup. We found it a huge asset for trail adventures.
    FORD & MAZDA TOYOTA

    Ford's new compact frontend uses F-150-style short- and long-arm IFS, with torsion bars. The setup offers big gains on pavement--but not without trail sacrifices.

    The new Pulse-Vacuum Hub (PVH) used exclusively on compact Fords and Mazdas allows for true in-cab-controlled shift-on-the-fly capability.

    Toyota's double A-arm/coilover frontend handles pavement cornering and trail flex with equal skill. We like the six-lug axles and big-caliper front discs.
  • spoogspoog Member Posts: 1,224
    http://www.fourwheeler.com/newtrucks/ptoty/98/howwedoit.html


    It's our assumption that pickups are made and bought, at some point, to do work. That's why we run our PTOTY test on the track and trail, with beds loaded and unloaded--and separate from sport-utilities, which we regard as primarily made to carry people and their gear.


    After weighing each truck at a commercial scale, we subtract that amount from the factory-rated Gross Vehicle Weight Rating (GVWR) to arrive at an actual maximum payload number. We run track testing with truck beds both empty and with half their calculated payload, this year using 35-pound bags of landscaping rock. In this case, the Ford and Mazda each ran with 16 bags, the Toyota with 18. We think it's valuable to see how each truck performs when carrying a load; that's why they have a bed. For a significant portion of the rest of the test, we run the trucks at half maximum payload. This also allows us to see how mileage is affected, as well as how the engine and chassis react.
    At each stage of our test, drivers rotated from truck to truck during a variety of terrain changes--recording comments and scoring each truck as they go.

    In the end, each tester scores each truck in 38 different categories with "Mechanical" accounting for 25 percent of the book total;
    "Trail Performance" accounting for 30 percent; "Highway Performance" 20 percent; "Interior" 15 percent; and "Exterior" 10 percent. Each logbook accounts for 80 percent of overall scoring, with the remaining 20 percent centered around our nine "Empirical" tests you'll find in chart form: Ground Clearance, Noise at 55 mph, Payload, and so forth.

    Finally, we've printed point totals so readers may weight their own "paper test," awarding points for those aspects of a truck they find most valuable. Some may appreciate interior or highway feel more than we have. Change the percentages around and choose your own winner. Of course, that certainly won't be as much fun (or difficult) as running around the countryside with a group of brand new four-bys.
  • spoogspoog Member Posts: 1,224
    "Praises relating to the TRD suspension mentioned
    its ability to control rutted, seriously choppy
    terra in better than any other vehicle we'd driven"


    - 4wheeler
  • spoogspoog Member Posts: 1,224
    "Ultimately, in addition to a strong engine, good
    tires, and supremely tuned suspension, the clutch
    defeat switch (the only one in a truck sold in the
    US.), lever-operated transfer case, and pushbutton
    locking rear differential were the icing on a toug
    h-truck cake. Although you have to pay a premium
    for a premium package, the TRD Tacoma, dollar for
    dollar, is the best on- and off-highway compact
    package (maybe of any truck) we've seen. This truck
    has features the others just don't offer, and they
    all w ork. And that's why it's our 1998 Pickup
    Truck of the Year. "
  • cpousnrcpousnr Member Posts: 1,611
    ". . .an environmentally responsible citizen."
  • cpousnrcpousnr Member Posts: 1,611
    http://www.pickuptruck.com/html/2001/ford/ranger/first_drive2.html

    "The Ranger lineup from Ford offers the ideal vehicle for virtually every compact pickup buyer, regardless of age, sex, ethnic background or religion. You may literally order your Ranger the way you want it, to suit your personal taste and requirements. We've already outlined the myriad of equipment choices and configuration available. "
    "As for 4x4 operation, the electronic function, on-dash knob selector for drive mode is easier to use when going 'over the river and through the woods' gets a little on the hairy side -- while the soon-to-come, Premium Off-Road Package provides a better ride with a more confident level of control during the rough stuff. The "Best of the Desert" practice course (though toned down some for our use) threw down the gauntlet with powdery, silted, tight banking turns, dips and bumps, mudholes and greasy, steep grades. Both the regular Off-road and Premium Off-road versions came through with flying colors (mostly muddy brown tones)."
    " Bottom line, the 2001 Ford Ranger stable is a more refined vehicle, is quieter, provides more power with greater fuel efficiency and a longer range and it promises to extend its sales leadership title as a result. It is also more environmentally friendly -- Mark Bill, Ranger Chief Program Engineer, points out that "The 2001 Ranger will meet low emission vehicle standards and achieve approximately 20-29 miles per gallon, allowing customers to use their vehicles for work and play while still being an environmentally responsible citizen."

    Thought spoog, except when it comes to posting Tacoma's ripping up the streams, mud pits etc, was

    ". . .an environmentally responsible citizen."
  • cpousnrcpousnr Member Posts: 1,611
    http://www.cnn.com/2000/US/07/27/ford7_27.a.tm/
    What happens to a corporation when environmental concerns overlap with good public relations? You get the latest Beltway love match: Ford Motor Company and the Sierra Club.

    It seems that ever since the giant automaker began investigating ways to entice green-minded consumers by improving the fuel efficiency of their gas-guzzling sport utility vehicles (beyond the requirements established by federal lawmakers), the company's become something of a poster child for corporate responsibility -- and a darling of the environmental movement, members of which are pointing to Ford's latest maneuvers as a sign that the very dirty car industry can, in fact, be cleaned up. And Wednesday, when Ford insiders leaked news that the company will actually act on those good intentions by increasing the average fuel economy on its SUVs, environmentalists raised the Ford banner ever higher. "
  • cpousnrcpousnr Member Posts: 1,611
    I had heard that Ford by 2005 will raise the MPG of it's SUV's by 25% to a bit over 25mpg.

    Not too bad. . .

    What does a Tacoma get? 17-19?

    Well what the heck, Tacoma's are such a small percentage of off-road vehicles...it's only a natural resource being used up at a higher rate. . .
  • hindsitehindsite Member Posts: 590
    "If you haven't had an opportunity to drive the new Toyota Tacoma TRD 4x4 yet, you are missing out. The engineers at Toyota have done it again. Any compliant that you might have had with the standard Tacoma has clearly been answered. This truck is awesome. With those Bilstein shocks, the truck flies over dirt roads that the regular Tacoma wants to die on. That locking rear diff really comes in handy for tackling those tougher trails, which you'll be looking for once you feel the way this truck handles.

    If there has to be one compliant, and there always has to be one compliant, it's that the rear springs allow a little too much rear wheel hop for my tastes. The rear springs just allow too much wind-up of the rear axle. With 190 Horsepower under your foot, there's just too much hopping and slipping. And the standard 31x10.5R15 Goodyear Wrangler GSA tires just don't hold when you need them to. The optional supercharger would be a waste on any truck that wasn't going to be towing the max all the time. And the front mud flaps don't stick out far enough too prevent hosing the sides of the truck down. Well, I guess there are really three things to gripe about, not that I'm really gripping.

    Now that that's out of the way, let me tell you why I fell in love with this truck. The interior of the truck is quite roomy for a compact truck, of course I wouldn't want to have to sit in the rear jumps seat for very long. The TRD has great road manners too. Going down the highway at just over legal speeds is no problem in this truck. Those mountain roads leading to your favorite trail seem a lot easier as well. We drove the TRD into some pretty tight corners and were amazed at how well it stuck. However, there is a noticeable amount of understeer, which is to be expected from a vehicle with a tail this light. The Goodyears seemed quite well suited for this type of use.

    On the trail the TRD handled even better, sucking up bumps and dips like I had never felt before. This suspension is truly in it's element out on the trail. We were going at least 10 mph faster in the TRD than when we were in the standard Tacoma and it felt twice as comfortable doing it. On a few of the hairier trails when a tire would lift, the TRD never felt unstable. We had the right rear tire three feet in the air and you couldn't feel it from the drivers seat. That locking rear diff really helps keep your forward momentum going as well. On the three occasions that we got a rear tire in the air, the locker kept us moving safely along.

    If any company was going to build a vehicle this cool, you knew it was going to be Toyota. For years older Toyotas have been a real force in offroading and now there is a new kid on the block that anyone can go down to their dealer and buy. If you are new to offroading and need to have a pick-up, the TRD is for you."
    Article by Bill Cooke from the "Offroad Exchange Magazine"
  • cpousnrcpousnr Member Posts: 1,611
    http://www.pickuptruck.com/html/2001/ford/ranger/first_drive.html


    The 2001 Ford Ranger compact pickup model lineup is definitely on a roll with trucks that should readily capture youthful new customers with active lifestyles, as well as appeal to loyal owners who are looking for a vehicle to better satisfy their ever changing lifestyles. The latest Rangers, which will go on sale in early Fall, serve up a bolder, more aggressive styling which takes certain design cues from their larger F-Series siblings. Going after the younger set, will be the new Ranger Edge, with the 4x4 XLT sharing some of the same visual elements. Base model Rangers will carry the XL designation, followed by the upscale XLT trim."
  • hindsitehindsite Member Posts: 590
    "Ford owners everywhere are reluctant to convey confidence and satisfaction when discussing their car with friends, family and coworkers as of late. In fact, out of 32 car manufacturers worldwide, Ford has dropped to 28th place for overall customer satisfaction. One customer for every 400 vehicles sold is involved in an unresolved claim, meaning either there is no known repair for a problem they are experiencing, or they have become so frustrated that they wish to have their car bought back."

    Article by James Brennan from "The Blue Oval News"
  • hindsitehindsite Member Posts: 590
    "Ford, rather than justify the extra revenue required to improve the quality of their parts, has chosen another route. After studying which repairs are the most common, they looked to Carl Bergman, Head of Parts and Service for the answer. His decision was to slash the warranty labor standards across the board, forcing the dealerships to help bear the burden."
    Article by Bill Brennan from "The Blue Oval News"
  • hindsitehindsite Member Posts: 590
    "Reported problems and vehicles to watch out for:
    • 4.6L and 5.4L V8 engines with piston slap:
    Some of these models, mostly found in trucks, exhibit engine piston slap. It was generally believed that engines built after April 1999 were cured of this problem; however, this may not be true.

    • 1997-2000 F150 door cracking:
    Applies to 1997-2001 light duty F-Series supercab trucks. The sheetmetal supporting the secondary
    door cracks causing a sheetmetal separation and paint cracking. Ford has no fix for this problem.

    • 2000 Focus recalls
    The first Ford Focus models were subject to three recalls before the vehicles left the plant. The recalls are minor and will be fixed at no charge.

    • SuperDuty ABS brakes:
    Ford literature states that 2000 model year SuperDuty crew cabs are equipped with 4 wheel anti locks brakes. It has also been reported that the vehicle's window sticker also has this as standard equipment; however, reports are surfacing that the trucks only have rear ABS.

    • 4.6L V8 intake manifold failures:
    Cracking plastic intake manifolds. Effects engines through 1997.

    • Continental, Taurus and Sable and Windstar transmission failures.

    • 3.8L V6 head gaskets (also visit here)
    Both front and rear wheel drive, all models.

    • 1999 Cobra Mustang:
    Engine does not produce advertised horsepower, loose battery cable causes not start condition,
    rear suspension produces driveline vibration, possible rear tie rod end failure.

    • 1995-newer Escort/Tracer power steering noise:
    NHTSA Item Number: SB047854. When turning the vehicle may make a popping noise. The noise
    is most likely associated with the design of the power steering gear valve. No fix is available.
    May effect resale value.

    • 1990-1993 Ford F150's with gasoline engines and dual fuel tanks. Fuel pump may purge fuel from one tank to the other. If one tank is full, the fuel will be dumped on the ground. NHTSA needs to know if your F150 has this serious condition. A recall occurred; however, it may NOT cure the problem.

    • Contour, Mystique and Cougars manual transmissions: Difficult shifting from gear to gear, especially in colder temperatures.

    • 1998-1999 Ford Explorer. Stall during left hand turns when operating in warm weather. Numerous
    listings can also be found in the NHTSA complaint data base."

    Article from the "The Blue Oval News"
  • hindsitehindsite Member Posts: 590
    "Reported problems and vehicles to watch out for:
    • 4.6L and 5.4L V8 engines with piston slap:
    Some of these models, mostly found in trucks, exhibit engine piston slap. It was generally believed that engines built after April 1999 were cured of this problem; however, this may not be true.

    • 1997-2000 F150 door cracking:
    Applies to 1997-2001 light duty F-Series supercab trucks. The sheetmetal supporting the secondary
    door cracks causing a sheetmetal separation and paint cracking. Ford has no fix for this problem.

    • 2000 Focus recalls
    The first Ford Focus models were subject to three recalls before the vehicles left the plant. The recalls are minor and will be fixed at no charge.

    • SuperDuty ABS brakes:
    Ford literature states that 2000 model year SuperDuty crew cabs are equipped with 4 wheel anti locks brakes. It has also been reported that the vehicle's window sticker also has this as standard equipment; however, reports are surfacing that the trucks only have rear ABS.

    • 4.6L V8 intake manifold failures:
    Cracking plastic intake manifolds. Effects engines through 1997.

    • Continental, Taurus and Sable and Windstar transmission failures.

    • 3.8L V6 head gaskets (also visit here)
    Both front and rear wheel drive, all models.

    • 1999 Cobra Mustang:
    Engine does not produce advertised horsepower, loose battery cable causes not start condition,
    rear suspension produces driveline vibration, possible rear tie rod end failure.

    • 1995-newer Escort/Tracer power steering noise:
    NHTSA Item Number: SB047854. When turning the vehicle may make a popping noise. The noise
    is most likely associated with the design of the power steering gear valve. No fix is available.
    May effect resale value.

    • 1990-1993 Ford F150's with gasoline engines and dual fuel tanks. Fuel pump may purge fuel from one tank to the other. If one tank is full, the fuel will be dumped on the ground. NHTSA needs to know if your F150 has this serious condition. A recall occurred; however, it may NOT cure the problem.

    • Contour, Mystique and Cougars manual transmissions: Difficult shifting from gear to gear, especially in colder temperatures.

    • 1998-1999 Ford Explorer. Stall during left hand turns when operating in warm weather. Numerous
    listings can also be found in the NHTSA complaint data base."

    Article from the "The Blue Oval News"
  • cpousnrcpousnr Member Posts: 1,611
    Failed to see any Ranger news in any of the items just posted by hindsite. . .

    Shall I search and find all the issues with the T100, at least a truck, and post 'em here to somehow soil the name of Toyota?
  • cpousnrcpousnr Member Posts: 1,611
    in this case http://www.blueovalnews.com and only finds and posts the bad stuff AND it does not even relate to the Ranger.

    Well look a little deeper and you find this:

    2001 Ford Ranger - "The Best Never Rest"
    (Part one of a four part series)

    Published: July 13, 2000
    Date of revision: None
    Source: Ford Motor Company
    By: Steve Blake - Staff Writer

    If there is anything that Ford Division has mastered, it's segment domination and the 2001 Ford Ranger promises to extend Ford Division's 13 year winning streak.

    "As the best-selling compact pickup for 13 straight years, Ranger has a heritage of delivering what customers are asking for - and more. But the best never rest, and we worked hard to ensure that the 2001Ranger builds on its solid base and then goes an extra step to deliver even more," said Gurminder Bedi - Vice President, Ford North American Truck

    For 2001, the "Built Ford Tough" Ranger - sales leader among compact pickups for the past 13 years - has more power, more performance, more personality and the type of refinement not often found in working-hard, playing-hard compact pickups.

    The 2001-model Ranger, easily identifiable by its bold new styling and new trim levels, is designed to offer customers more choices within the compact pickup market. Design elements from Ford's F-Series pickups give a visual cue to the Ranger's tough-truck evolution. On 4x4 XLT and an all-new Edge series, the hood is raised - giving a hint at the added power under the hood. Alternative grille treatments include high-tech mesh or the more traditional two-bar chrome grille cues creating a strong family resemblance.

    Under the hood, Ranger offers three engine choices: a new optional 4.0-liter SOHC V-6, which produces 207 horsepower, 29 percent increase than the previous model's V-6; a 3.0-liter OHV V-6, and an I-4 engine. At introduction, the 2.5-liter I-4 engine currently offered in the Ranger will be available. Later this winter, an all-new I-4 engine will be introduced.

    Ranger's suspension has been revised to accommodate the new engines and to provide refined ride-and-handling characteristics. Changes include updated front-end geometry, stabilizer bar rates, spring rates, upgraded bushings and shock tuning modifications. The 2001 Ranger also has a quieter interior cabin, thanks to improvements made to isolate noise vibration and harshness (NVH). Stopping performance also is improved through the use of a four-wheel anti-lock braking system (ABS), electronic brake force distribution (EBD) and innovations in the braking system that optimize braking performance with the vehicle loaded or empty.

    Configurations

    Ranger is available in three trim-levels and several configurations to deliver a wide range of choices to customers. Customers in the compact truck segment often "customize" their trucks by buying a base-model and adding accessories to suit their taste. Aiding the ability to customize, the 2001 Ranger will be available as a Regular Cab or SuperCab, with three wheelbase choices, a traditional Styleside or a more distinct Flareside box and several payload capabilities. The SuperCab version, most popular with buyers, is expected to account for more than 60 percent of sales.

    In addition to the value-level XL and the most popular XLT model, the Ranger has a new trim level for 2001 - the Edge.

    Edge

    The Edge, with its aggressive styling and high stance, is a new series aimed at young, active-lifestyle customers who want a vehicle with a distinctive appearance at an affordable price. Edge is positioned in the Ranger stable between the XL and XLT models and offers custom appearance and performance features normally not found at this price level.

    Key Edge features include:

    Monochromatic exterior, available in red, white, blue, black or Chrome Yellow
    4x4 ride height, even in 4x2 configurations
    Bed rail and raised power dome hood
    A durable interior with vinyl floor, for easy cleanup
    A four-speaker CD system with Dolby, AM/FM stereo and 60 watts of power
    Custom wheels and tires, with tow hooks, fog lamps and a mesh-type grille
    3.0-liter V-6 engine, coupled with a five-speed manual transmission, both standard
    Air conditioning
    Powertrains

    The 2001 Ranger is available with a 4x2 or 4x4 powertrain and three engines: an optional 4.0-liter SOHC V-6, a 3.0-liter OHV V-6 and an I-4 engine.

    New for 2001 is the optional 4.0-liter SOHC V-6, which boasts 207 horsepower at 5,250 rpm and produces 238 ft.-lbs. of torque at 3,000 rpm. The new 4.0-liter SOHC gives customers an increase of 47 horsepower over the previous model.

    The 4.0-liter SOHC engine is coupled with either a new five-speed automatic transmission with adaptive shift technology or a heavy-duty, five-speed manual transmission.

    The 3.0-liter OHV V-6 engine will continue to be offered on Ranger and is standard on 4x4s, SuperCabs and the Edge series. It produces 150 horsepower at 5,000 rpm and 185 ft.-lbs. of torque at 3,750 rpm.

    The 2.5-liter SEFI I-4, currently offered on the Ranger, will remain in the 2001 Ranger powertrain lineup until later this winter, when it will be replaced by an all-new I-4 engine. The I-4 engine is standard on the XL and XLT 4x2 Regular Cab models. The 2.5-liter I-4, available at introduction, achieves 119 horsepower at 5,000 rpm and 146 ft.-lbs. of torque at 3,000 rpm. Further details regarding the all-new I-4 engine will be provided at a later date.

    Special Package

    In addition to the new Edge series, the Ranger Tremor will be offered as an optional audio package. It brings an aftermarket-grade audio system to a compact pickup. First introduced in summer 2000, Tremor includes a premium, high-powered stereo with 560 watts of power and a custom designed-in subwoofer enclosure that fits nicely in the rear floor area. In order to accommodate the built-in subwoofer, the Tremor package only is available in Ranger SuperCab models. The stereo system has been tuned to deliver tonal accuracy and imaging over a wide audio spectrum, from 20 Hz to 20,000 Hz.

    It includes:

    In-dash Pioneer CD, cassette and AM/FM stereo with selectable audio profiles. It also has an upgradeable Double-DIN head unit and 13-band graphic display.
    A subwoofer housing built onto the floor behind the front seats. The housing offers three cubic feet of space for the 10-inch bass speaker to perform its function of pumping out sound. Storage bins replace the normal jump seats because the speaker housing takes up literally all the rear floor space.
    Four two-way Pioneer speakers which are mounted in the doors and rear passenger area.
    The Environment

    In addition to achieving fuel economy ratings of up to 29 miles per gallon, both Ranger V-6 engines sold in the United States are certified as Low Emission Vehicles (LEV), further demonstrating our commitment to the environment. Ranger also is 90 percent recyclable by weight.

    Ranger will continue to be offered as an Electric Vehicle (EV) to customers in California. The EV Ranger will feature carryover styling and be equipped with advanced nickel metal hydride (NiMH) batteries. The NiMH Ranger EV offers useful range and payload.

    Market Trend

    The compact pickup truck market has grown from total sales of approximately 500,000 in 1980 to 1.4 million vehicles in 1986. Since then, segment sales have been in the range of one million units a year.

    Ford sold 104,396 Ranger compact trucks in 1982, the first year the model was available. Since then, more than five million Ranger trucks have been produced.

    Ranger quickly became the segment's sales leader, a position it has held since 1987, with sales consistently in the range of 300,000 units. Ranger unit sales reached 348,358 in 1999, when it captured a record share of the compact pickup market segment, at 32.2 percent. First-half sales figures for 2000 indicate that Ranger will retain its segment sales leadership this calendar year.

    Markets

    In addition to the U.S. and Canada, the Ford Ranger is sold in Puerto Rico, the U.S. Virgin Islands, South America, Central America, Caribbean Islands, Guam, New Caledonia, Saipan, Tahiti, and U.S. Samoa. In South America, where Ranger serves as family transportation for many customers, Ranger is offered in a four-door crew-cab configuration.

    Assembly Plants

    The 2001 Ranger will be built at Ford's Twin Cities, Minn., and Edison, N.J., assembly plants in the U.S. The new models begin production in the summer of 2000 and will begin arriving in dealer showrooms this fall.
  • cpousnrcpousnr Member Posts: 1,611
    2001 Ford Ranger - "The Best Never Rest"
    (Part two of a four part series)

    Published: July 13, 2000
    Date of revision: None
    Source: Ford Motor Company
    By: Steve Blake - Staff Writer

    Driving Dynamics

    Ford's mission for 2001 was to give the Ranger more powerful new engines without allowing any extraneous engine noise to reach the cabin.

    "When customers get in the Ranger, we hope they will be pleasantly surprised by what they do not hear. We've done a lot of work to reduce transient noises in the vehicle and improve overall cabin comfort," said Mark Bill, Ranger Chief Program Engineer

    A quiet ride is not normally expected from work-hard, play-hard pickup trucks, yet customers of all types appreciate a quieter vehicle. This subject is dear to the heart of Ranger Chief Program Engineer Mark Bill, who previously worked on the noise, vibration and harshness (NVH) program for the Lincoln Town Car. He brought the same noise-reduction sensitivity to Ranger. The result, Bill says, is the quietest Ranger yet.

    "As we progressed on the vehicle's development, we said, 'Let's just keep making it better,'" said Jeff Lewis, NVH supervisor for the vehicle.

    Studies consistently show that customer satisfaction is directly related to two factors: quiet engines and quiet interiors. Buyers might not consciously decide these issues are important or give any weight to them at the time of purchase, but nagging noises can frustrate customers over the long haul. Quietness is clearly a key to building the kind of satisfaction that brings a customer back at trade-in time.

    In the Ranger, an immediate noise-related advantage came with the new engines, which are more refined as well as more powerful. The Ranger's development engineers found that right kind of sound - a throaty roar when you really push the gas pedal - is viewed positively by customers. But the wrong kind of sound can make it difficult to hold a conversation or listen to the stereo. The new engines available in the Ranger are designed to address these issues.

    The new, 207-horsepower, 4.0-liter single overhead cam (SOHC) V-6 engine replaces last year's overhead valve (OHV) design and offers more of those "good" engine sounds that convey power. To aid NVH levels, both the 3.0-liter V-6 and 4.0-liter SOHC V-6 engine mounts have been tuned to reduce vibrations reaching the passenger compartment. A more efficient insulating blanket helps keep sound under the hood.

    "The expectation level has been raised for compact trucks," says Ranger Powertrain Manager Bob Fascetti. "I think we were pleasantly surprised at how far we were able to take this vehicle."

    The new five-speed adaptive shift transmission, available with the 2001 Ranger powertrains, uses a computer control module that includes throttle position sensing among its measurements and shifts the transmission into a higher gear sooner when it senses that a leisurely driving pace is desired. This offers the best fuel economy and the kind of quiet operation designed to make the powertrain "transparent" in normal city driving. It also helps to reduce wear. When the driver asks for more power by pushing the accelerator pedal harder, the transmission holds the shift until the engine reaches the rpm range that produces optimum horsepower and torque.

    Inside the cabin, a laminated steel instrument panel further helps reduce vibration. The instrument panel itself has more sound insulation, and even the flooring has more noise-absorbing properties.

    Inside the cabin, sound engineers installed expandable foams and sealers to reduce noise coming from outside. Door, window and mirror seals were redesigned to reduce air leakage and wind noise.

    Off the pavement, with the windows down and nature supplying the soundtrack, noise is not a problem. But, on the highway, excessive noise and vibration add a fatiguing level of discomfort for the driver and passengers. Those noises force occupants to turn up the stereo or turn up the volume on a simple conversation. Remove unwanted noises, and everyone is more comfortable - and in the long run, more satisfied with their vehicle. The 2001 Ranger has accomplished this feat and promises to deliver best-in-class comfort.
  • cpousnrcpousnr Member Posts: 1,611
    Ford is more enviornmentally friendly than Toyota and there is allways change in the Ranger line to improve the product, be responsive to it's current and potential buyers AND retain and increase it's market share, basically domination, of the small truck market.

    Like 'em or hate 'em, Ford Rules the small and large truck market.

    Get in line or get out of the way.
  • cpousnrcpousnr Member Posts: 1,611
    Engines, transmissions, interior noise reduction, sound systems...the list goes on and on. Clearly the vehicle of choice.

    Ford Ranger, #1 in small truck sales for

    13 years in a row.

    Or......

    you can get a Tacoma with pre 1996/97 engineered design, no changes other than spiffy new colors. . .
  • cpousnrcpousnr Member Posts: 1,611
    From Blue Oval News

    Very Important (519) 66%


    Somewhat Important (208) 26%


    Not Important (49) 6%

    And what was the crash test rating of the Ranger vs the Tacoma? Five stars side vs one star side impact?

    Any you WONDER why the Tacoma sales are down and they have to discount them down to almost the price of a Ranger to move them off the lot?



    Total Selections: 776
  • spoogspoog Member Posts: 1,224
    Funny how Cspounser is quoting the ACTUAL CAR MANUFACTURER. This type of mentality is akin to
    believing a politician by what he promises instead of what he has done.

    Good job Cspounser!!! Posting info from ghost trucks that no one can buy!

    Thats ok though, when you have been whipped as bas as you have in this discussion, youll grasp at anything you can to hang on.


    Cspousner-

    Farmer John called. He want's his straw back......
  • spoogspoog Member Posts: 1,224
    "Or......

    you can get a Tacoma with pre 1996/97 engineered
    design, no changes other than spiffy new colors. .
    ."


    Which offers better reliability, better offroading ability, a quiter interior, more durable build, tows more, hauls more, performs better, and offers features( like a lever tranny case !!! LOL!!!!!!)


    It's one thing for the manufacturer of the truck in question to CLAIM its product "will" do something, then to make an actual product that DOES what they say it will.
  • spoogspoog Member Posts: 1,224
    http://www.nhtsa.dot.gov/cars/problems/



    1999 Ranger recalls - 3
    1999 Tacoma recalls - 0


    2000 Ranger recalls - 1
    2000 Tacoma recalls - 0



    Total recalls from 1989-2000(Ranger)-

    32


    Total recalls from 1989-2000(Tacoma)-

    6



    ------
  • spoogspoog Member Posts: 1,224
    This test started in 1994, and ended in 1999. Yes, 5 years of dependability testing.




    http://www.jdpa.com/studies/pressrelease.asp?StudyID=292&CatID=1



    And yes, Toyota DOMINATES the 4x4 market YET again.

    This is a 5 year, QUALITY,wear and tear, dependability test.


    Like I said gang, it's one thing for a compnay to say that something is "gonna happen" and its another thing to BACK IT UP and actually MAKE it happen.
  • modvptnlmodvptnl Member Posts: 1,352
    Don't want to get into a argument with you but you're 100% wrong. I've built countless motors including the 502 Chevy in my boat and there is no specific difference or tuning that allows the exhaust to exit under water. All AUTOMOTIVE based marine engines from the family boat builders(Bayliner, Sea Ray, Four Winns etc.) have their exhaust going through the SUBMERGED prop or through the transom underwater. In a few custom type applications the boats will run exhaust over the transom
    My trucks have been up to there door sills on the ramp COMPLETELY submerging the exhaust with NEVER a problem running or re-starting.Didn't understand your comment about if you hear burbling your exhaust isn't underwater. It was under water and remember gas will rise and creating the bubbles.

    Have you ever farted in a bathtub? Didn't blow a gasket, did you.
  • allknowingallknowing Member Posts: 866
    I've seen several engines blown because they have had their exhaust submerged including my sister's on a trip to Mexico. If you're lucky enough to not have your engine stall because of the back pressure, I imagine you may get away without damage. The exhaust gas has to exit your cylinders or the engine won't continue running and if you understand how an engine works you know that. If the engine has enough positive pressure the exhaust will be dissipated but it's not good for the engine. Why do headers give you an increase in power output? It's because the engine has an easier and more complete dissipation of the exhaust gasses. I've never worked on a 4 cycle engine in a boat so I really don't know the particulars but if they aren't compensating for the increased back pressure, you're loosing much of your potential horsepower. If you'd like me to research it for you I will. If you want me to not believe that the cars I saw trashed their engines when they were submerged, I don't think so. I'm not an auto engineer but I've worked on cars and built engines most of my life. I can't deny what I've seen. Go stick a a bunch of mud in your exhaust pipe and tell me how well your truck performs.
  • allknowingallknowing Member Posts: 866
    cp- you realize that you are pretty much spoog's evil double or vice versa. The 2001 Ranger may be great but hype about upcoming vehicles is typically overrated so we'll see. I don't think that comparing a proposed 2005 Ranger to todays Tacoma makes much sense as you did in post #119. Even if they do achieve that mpg, who knows what Toyota will have by then. Lets see what they really do when they're available.
    One more thing, rather than have post after post trying to trash Toyota or raise Ford in respect to quality why not just acknowledge the bottom line. The Ranger is definitely one of Fords best vehicles and has well above average quality but Ford still has less than par quality on many of their vehicles. Toyota maintains one of the highest levels of quality on every vehicle they produce. That really can't be disputed so why do we continue trying in this forum?
  • allknowingallknowing Member Posts: 866
    typo- I meant to say "If you don't want me to not believe that the cars I saw trashed their engines when they were submerged, I don't think so".
  • allknowingallknowing Member Posts: 866
    You've sparked my interest because I don't know a lot about boat engines. I know for fact what submerginging the exhaust can do to a car so I'm curious how they get around it in a boat. If anyone in this forum knows It will save me the time of researching the answer.
  • barlitzbarlitz Member Posts: 752
    I guess I'll rewrite what I wrote before a TSB is nothing more than an opinion of a customer or a technician.It does not mean there is anything wrong with your truck and again from www.putc.com the Ranger outsold the Tacoma 2.25 trucks to 1 last year and is on a 2.6 to 1 pace this year go back to 1989 and they are probably a 10 to 1 ratio,so if they sold 1 million Tacomas from 1989 thats 10 million Rangers there should be more TSB's.
    Things to look for in the 2001 Ranger offroad package,bilstein shocks,31" BFG's,solid front axle,limited slip front axle a possible supercharged 4.0 in the future,4 leaf springs, rear anti sway bars,new torsion bars, standard 4 wheel abs in all models,4 doors in all models.a possible all wheel drive 3.9L V8( same engine in the lincoln LS).skid plates,new cupholders,a rear bench rather than jump seats.There are many changes coming also a new inline V4 coming soon to.Also a V6 deisel availaible for the F150 maybe ranger too who knows.Also check out www.wardsauto.com. The 5.4 is one of the top 10 best engines in the world for under $50,000 vehicles.What does Ford do they make a 3 valve per cylander 5.4 V8 with 310 Hp and 385 lbs Tque.Ford continously tries to improve on an already great product line.BTW didn't Ford buy LandRover maybe they'll start using the LandRover off road enginerring in the technologies.
  • allknowingallknowing Member Posts: 866
    A quick look on the net shows lots of designs to compensate for the back pressure and potential engine damage from the water. Looks like they use the water to cool the exhaust so that's why it's submerged but I have to do more reading when I get time. Bottom line is that they have specially designed exhaust systems and your truck doesn't. I'd be careful.
  • hindsitehindsite Member Posts: 590
    Having been a Ford owner and finally today I sold my lemon Taurus after $2700.00 plus dollars in repair bills at a lost today . . . I have every right and reason why not to like Ford.

    BTW Mr. Bill Brennan is a Ford technican.
  • hindsitehindsite Member Posts: 590
    Correction

    James Brennan

    You had mentioned that those Taco that stalled in the water had the likelyhood of engine damage. Again you are wrong or just reaching desperately.
  • hindsitehindsite Member Posts: 590
    "In regards to symptom diagnosis, many repairs are closed out with "No Problem Found" written in the tech's notes. If the tech knows he is not getting paid to diagnose the customer's concern, he is likely to make a quick inspection, and release the vehicle if it does not act up promptly. As a technician, my goal is to perform the best repair possible. These warranty cuts, however, tend to promote speed, rather than quality, leading to repeat repairs, no problem founds, and customer frustration. Ford has been saving money on warranty costs by taking it from the dealerships, when they could just as easily make changes in manufacturing and engineering processes to keep the vehicles from breaking down in the first place.

    The time has come for Ford Motor Company to take responsibility for the quality of their products, instead of forcing it's dealers and technician's to pick up the slack. There is no reason why Ford should not stand behind their cars, and be willing to pay a fair price for warranty repairs. After all, Quality is Job #1 isn't it?"

    About James Brennan

    James Brennan has been a technician for Ford dealerships since 1993. He has
    an associate's degree in automotive service technology from Ferris State University. He has also earned the Ford ASSET diploma as well. He was employed in Michigan as a certified from technician, until 1997, when he relocated to California to accept a position in the same field. Mr. Brennan holds Ford STST certifications for electrical, climate control, and engine repair."
  • hindsitehindsite Member Posts: 590
    When are you going to put out your own web site showing your fictitous truck. I have heard it was Cpousnr the show pics of your truck.
  • hindsitehindsite Member Posts: 590
    Having had this screen name for a while and unable to change & correct the last name that is erroneous. I am changing my screen name.
  • cpousnrcpousnr Member Posts: 1,611
    don't take "masked avenger"
  • cpousnrcpousnr Member Posts: 1,611
    Well I can agree with somethings you say.

    How about a comparison within the brands:

    Comparing a Ranger to a Taurus is like comparing

    a Camry to a Tacoma.



    There is a double meaning there for the un-enlightened.
  • cpousnrcpousnr Member Posts: 1,611
    "Funny how Cspounser is quoting the ACTUAL CAR
    MANUFACTURER."

    Really?

    "BlueOvalNews - Independent Voice of the Ford Community"

    "BlueOvalNews.com is recognized as being the leading independent publisher of news and information regarding the world's number two auto manufacturer, Ford Motor Company.

    BlueOvalNews.com is committed to increasing its high volume of traffic and has been featured in stories published by the Automotive News, Detroit Free Press, Detroit News, USA Today, Wall Street Journal and many other industry leading publications."

    Oh, oh, hindsite, did not see the BON URL on your posts as mine did, BUSTED

    "Media Members
    Original BlueOvalNews material may be used without permission provided that three conditions are met.

    BlueOvalNews is noted as the source.

    Credit is given to the author.

    The BlueOvalNews url, www.BlueOvalNews.com is included.

    Any questions regarding published articles should be directed to Robert Lane at [email protected]."
  • cpousnrcpousnr Member Posts: 1,611
    I KNOW independent as thought by you is as nasty a Republican (pssst they are taking votes away in droves from the great enviornmentalist)

    BUT,

    They REPORT info from Ford, good or bad and do not appear to be PART of Ford

    Your not the sharpest knife in the drawer are you?
  • cpousnrcpousnr Member Posts: 1,611
    Canm you say 11-14 points down, loosing in 41 state, winning in only 2 spoog?

    Just push that unroaded plan off another couple of months. . .
  • cpousnrcpousnr Member Posts: 1,611
    Mr.Toy
  • thehitcherthehitcher Member Posts: 56
    Hi Folks,
    Well, I have that new screen name as you can see. I took the name HindSite since I was called Mr Hind whenever I was at the construction site.

    Cpousnr,
    An Army brat is always better than a Navy brat.
This discussion has been closed.