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Honda Civic: Problems & Solutions

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Comments

  • spokanespokane Posts: 514
    Keep up the good work Auburn; I felt sure that you were thinking of an older model on the speedometer question. And no, I don't have the depth of experience that you obviously have.
  • Thanks... unfortunately I will not be heading up your way otherwise I will be happy to drop by and say hi!
  • legaleselegalese Posts: 3
    Thanks auburn 63 and spokane for the advice. This was my first post and I was pleasantly surprised to get such detailed suggestions so quickly. Now I'll feel a little more prepared when I bring my car in. It seems to be doing it more frequently now, so I'll have to bite the bullet soon. BTW, my odometer appears to be accurate.

    A couple of follow-up questions:

    Do you think this is something that only the dealer can/should fix (and charge me 3X the cost) or can I go to my local mechanic who specializes in Hondas and seems pretty fair when it comes to pricing?

    Also, aside from the irritation of watching my speedometer dancing around and not knowing exactly how fast I'm going, is there an urgent reason to get this problem fixed?
  • manimaranmanimaran Posts: 2
    Hi everyone,
    In my 95 civic, the power lock is not working once the car is started or the driver side door is closed. If the driver side door is open (without the car started), then it works fine. If the car is started, then it never works.
    This has been happening recently.
    Any advice would be appreciated. Thanks
  • auburn63auburn63 Posts: 1,162
    check the door jam area where the wire harness comes into the door. The wires work loose and make and break contact as the doors are opened and closed.Try working the door lock switch while wiggling the wires. Try that first then we can try something else if this doesnt do it.
  • manimaranmanimaran Posts: 2
    The suggestion given by you worked. I pushed the wire harness inside and tied them closely. Then it started working. Thanks again.
  • auburn63auburn63 Posts: 1,162
    Glad to hear we got lucky and found it without to much hard work. Glad to be of help.See ya
  • johno8johno8 Posts: 4
    I have a 90 Civic Sedan LX with 191,000 miles. Last week, it began to develop a vibration in the steering wheel and brake pedal when applying brakes. I figured with high mileage, replace the front rotors. The Civic still has the same warped-rotor feel when applying brakes! A friend said my mistake was using non-Factory Honda brake parts. Is there a big difference in quality between Brembo and Factory Honda brake parts?
    The rear drum brakes make a squawk sound moments before coming to a complete stop. I've cleaned out the brake dust, replaced the shoes (with non-Factory Honda brake shoes), then replaced the drums. Still have the sound. I'll bite the bullet if I should go with Factory Honda parts. I welcome your comments and wisdom.
  • auburn63auburn63 Posts: 1,162
    Well in my opinion, you can have any good tech work on your car but the only good part to use are the factory parts. They make a big differance. As for will it cure your shimmy? Well it is possible that it may I know the factory rotors come through resurfaced and usally do not need cutting after installation. You will also want to check the slide pins for the caliper to make sure they are not sticking and heating up the rotors. The rears making the squawk noise maybe the rears out of adjustment. Too tight more than to loose but the aftermarket parts dont help matters either..Well that is my .2 cents worth anyhow, good luck
  • Hey guys, looking for an unbiased opinion: just bought a brand new 2000
    Honda Civic which of course has a clear coat finish. Apparently, the garage
    it
    was parked in at the dealer was painted and there were many light, very
    tiny white dots of paint that had misted on to the car from the paint
    spray. I was reluctnat to accept the car, but the dealer said they
    could
    be detailed off -- however, now I find out that they had to send it to
    a
    body shop to be wet sanded. They say it looks perfect; but I'm upset
    about the situation (the salesman was supposed to call me before doing
    anything like this). I can not imagine how the clear coat would
    withstand "wetsanding" of any form. Should I ask them to put another
    layer of clear coat on that half of the car? (Is that even possible?) I
    am at the point where I do not want to accept the car because of this.
    The dealer says they will put a "free" sealant on it and that doing so
    will return the car to normal. I've always heard that these sealants
    are a waste of money; moreover, can a sealant truly replace a sanded
    clear coat? Am I overreacting? Do you have an expert there on this
    stuff or similar experiences. Need help ASAP. Thanks!
  • gaelic123gaelic123 Posts: 1
    I am looking at buying at 97 civic h/b, with 44K
    miles. At 38K, the current owner noticed the
    headlights were dimming and had the alternator
    replaced. Apparently the replacement was defective
    and was replaced a second time. Is this car OK to
    buy? The timing of this sale sounds fishy.

    There are other civic with low miles that are
    several years old. Does age matter? Thanks for
    any help!
  • rbalkrbalk Posts: 15
    Just bought Civic EX Auto a week ago and pleased with this. I am not sure if it is normal feeling for D4 because this shift made me feel like D2. When the gas was let go, the car slowed down a little bit hard just like shifting from D4 to D2. Is that normal? Thank you
  • rbalkrbalk Posts: 15
    Sorry not to mention the year on the Civic I mentioned above. It is 2000.
  • fkdcrxfkdcrx Posts: 6
    Refuse delivery. Go to another dealer.
    The sealent is just a peace offering. The sealent will never replace the clear coat that was removed.Tecnicly you should never wet sand a water based airborn paint. Depending on the colour you'll have permanent swirl marks in the finish (the sealent will HIDE this not protect the finish) Sealents are a good idea if youre lasy and hate to wax your car every 2 months.
    With the removal of the clear coat your paint will fade at diffrent rates (the clear coat acts like a uv filter)I repainted my CRX's hood now I have a yelloish hood and white car (was clearcoated a few years back)
    I would not deal with this dealer EVER it doesnt sound like they care about thier customers cars or rights. They'll end up screwing you more down the road.
    I found a smaller dealer in richer neighborhoods gives you better deals (on new not used)and better service. The big guys never care (if a sales man/woman only cares about selling. I.E. asking if they can prep a car for you or gives you ANY pressure leave! youll get bad service.
    I passed up the Capitol honda dealer who has hundereds of cars for Los Gatos who only had one of what I was lookiing for Because the sales man only wanted to show off the hondas! He didnt care for a sale.
    Ops kinda off topic huh?
    Hope this helps some.......
    FkdCRX
  • fkdcrxfkdcrx Posts: 6
    OOPS! the above was to be directed to:
    #73 of 77: Help! (hollywood11) Fri 19 May '00 (11:12 AM) SORRY!!!!
  • fkdcrxfkdcrx Posts: 6
    this post is mainly to auburn63 but if anyone else has any info please post!
    I would like to know if there has been any problems with the CVT transmission on the HX model of civic? anything hesatation, belt slippage (streching),sticking,ect.
    Oh yea does anyone fint L useless at anything above 20mph? It revs to about 4,000 and hovers around 20~25mph an equivalent to a short first gear.
  • auburn63auburn63 Posts: 1,162
    Hello,
    No, as of yet there has not been anyone complain of any problems with the CVT. The only common complaint is the noise it makes in reverse but that is normal and no big deal. So far they have been a great trans.Just remember to use the Honda fluid on it at service time.
  • cookstercookster Posts: 10
    I have a 97 Civic Sedan LX with 35k on it. I have had the recommended valve adjustment performed by a local Honda dealer. After the valve adjustment was done the engine seemed to be noisier under acceleration and at highway speed ,as well as idling more roughly when warming up. I took the car back to the dealer and they said the valves were adjusted to Honda factory specs and everything seemed OK.
    I took it to another dealer and they could find nothing wrong.

    I would appreciate any advice you can give.

    Thanks
  • auburn63auburn63 Posts: 1,162
    Well if it was running fine before then it would seem as if maybe one or more valves may be a little tight. If they rechecked and say no and they are telling the truth(which is very possible) then maybe there is carbon build up on the valves and it just needs to be driven a little hard to clean out a bit.PCV even maybe went bad, lots of possibilities actually.Try and give us a little more info if possible and we will see if we can help.
  • cookstercookster Posts: 10
    Thanks to auburn63 for your quick response to my query. I tend to drive my Civic fairly aggressively - routinely rev over 4000 rpm. The car has an automatic trans. I normally use mid-grade or premium octane gasoline in the car. One mechanic at the Honda dealership suggested that using a gasoline higher than the 87 octane recommended for the car might be the source of the problem - but is didn't seem to matter before the valve adjustment. I noticed a difference in the way the car ran immediately after that was done. Is it possible the dealership could have screwed up something else that would make it run this way? I have had no problems with the car since new. The only parts replaced in the car so far have been the plugs, air filter and fuel filter. I hope this is enough additional information for you to help.

    Thanks again
  • auburn63auburn63 Posts: 1,162
    I think you may have to either attempt a valve adjustment yourself and or have another dealer check it for you. Being that you didnt have a problem before and now notice one, then it would seem as if they may have made a valve too tight.Mind you a tight valve would not make it noisier,however would make it idle roughly.As for the noise does it sound like a ping or like a deep roar kind of sound?
    One other question have you had a check engine light on? Your year Civic has been known to cause a misfire code and if it has one you may be able to get a new computer.But if no light then you would not be able to.
  • cookstercookster Posts: 10
    I would characterize the noise as a pinging type of noise that is particularly noticeable around 2000 rpm when accelerating. At speeds over that the engine has a gruffer sound than it did before - just not a smooth sounding. I found prior to the valve adjustment I could not hear any engine noise at highway speeds up to about 70 mph. Now when I am cruising at 60 mph I hear what sounds like valvetrain clatter.
    The check engine light has never come on.

    I have owned 7 Honda's since 1979 and have never had a valve adjustment done where it made any difference to the way the car ran.

    Thanks again for your advice.
  • racer_x_9racer_x_9 Posts: 91
    How much work is involved in replacing an antenna for a 94 civic ex? I have the OEM part.

    Thanks
  • auburn63auburn63 Posts: 1,162
    The antennas are not hard for us but they are not fun. You have to get to the antenna end at the back of the radio, then un route it from under the dash. Then tie a peice of wire at the end of it so when you pull it out of the pillar area you can just pull the new one through with it.then reverse the order. Now after all that rambling that is if the antena is on the roof, drivers side.I have a hard time keeping track of model years.If I wasnt clear enough let me know and I will try to be more clear.
  • racerx_9racerx_9 Posts: 7
    Drivers roof indeed. Thanks again.

    I've lurked on many topics on this board and can say NOBODY offers more valuable advice than yourself.
  • auburn63auburn63 Posts: 1,162
    Well thank you very much, although there are alot of people that know alot of info on these boards. I get amazed sometimes.....But thanks, have a good one.........
  • igloomasterigloomaster Posts: 249
    HI - MY FRIEND TRISH JUST HAD HER ENTIRE AUTOMATIC
    TRANSMISSION REPLACED ON HER 98 CIVIC AT 35K. SHE
    DID NOT PURCHASE THE EXTENEDED WARRANTY, SO SHE
    WAS LUCKY THAT SHE JUST MADE IT UNDER 36K FOR THE
    ORIG WARRANTY.

    IS THIS COMMON WITH HONDA CIVIC AUTOMATICS? I
    HAVE A 10 MONTH OLD 99 CIVIC AUTOMATIC,AND I DIDN'T
    PURCHASE AN EXTENDED WARRANTY. THE CAR HAS 19K ON
    IT NOW.

    I WILL GO TO THE DEALERSHIP RIGHT NOW AND PURCHASE
    THAT EXTENDED WARRANTY IF THE AUTOMATIC
    TRANSMISSIONS IN THESE HONDAS HAVE A HABIT OF
    CRAPPING OUT. I HAVE NOT HEARD OF SUCH A THING,
    AND EVEN TRISH THINKS THAT HER TRANNY WAS JUST A
    LEMON, BUT I'M NOT SURE I SHOULD TAKE THAT CHANCE.
    ANYONE OUT THERE HAVE ANY THOUGHTS? I PLAN ON
    DRIVING THIS CAR WELL INTO 300K.

    IN OTHER WORDS, I'M KEEPING IT FOREVER!
  • mohmmohm Posts: 1
    Yes. Honda has a history of poor auto transmission design and reliability. For those who remember the first few years Honda cars were introduced in the US, Honda had serious problems with auto transmission. Even though with significant improvements in the last decades, Honda still lags behind other manufacturers in this aspect. If one wants to enjoy the most out of a Honda, standard transmission is the way to go!

    While we are on the topic, I never cease to amaze the strange driving culture in the US. While automatic transmissions are rare in Europe (and elsewhere in the world), Americans still insist on auto transmission. Why? Does it have anything to do with the laziness in "spoiled-brats" attitudes among American drivers?
  • spokanespokane Posts: 514
    The high level of preference for automatic transmissions in North America is surely related to the long travel distances and fuel price structure. These factors facilitated the development of large, comfortable, cars with engines sufficiently large to operate the rather inefficient fluid couplings and torque converters of the early automatic transmissions. Most other economies continued with smaller vehicles which were not compatible with the early inefficient & heavy automatics. 87% of American cars had automatics by 1957 so this is the conventional and usual transmission choice for a great many of today's American drivers.
  • igloomasterigloomaster Posts: 249
    that are a simple enough reason for preferring an automatic over a manual:

    CITY DRIVING.

    try communting in the morning for a few hours through Boston or New York with a manual....you'll hate all the clutch work - the incessant 1 to 2 stop, 1 to 2 stop.

    in all other circumstance, a manual is great.
    in heavy traffic, it sucks.
This discussion has been closed.