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Toy, Model & Collectible Replica Cars

17891113

Comments

  • steverstever Posts: 52,462
    edited October 2013
    The easiest way is to park the photos at a hosting site somewhere, like flickr.com or tinypic.com, and then link to the photo url at the hosting site.

    For example, http://tinypic.com/r/29nt4py/4.
  • andys120andys120 Loudon NHPosts: 20,658
    The fact that it is a Soviet-era model of a Russian-made car means that it should be extremely rare in the US.

    If you could not find another on the internet suggest it is probably rare if not unheard of anywhere in the world.

    As for its monetary value, the only way to know would be to put it up for bids at auction (ebay.com)

    2001 BMW 330ci/E46, 2008 BMW 335i conv/E93

  • fintailfintail Posts: 48,270
    Something for lemko - a new brand called "Auto World" is starting a "land yachts" line. Not 100% perfectly proportioned, but in 1:64 scale and cheapish, not bad.
  • lemkolemko Philadelphia, PAPosts: 15,306
    Cool! That appears to be a 1976 Cadillac Coupe DeVille. Where will they be sold?
  • fintailfintail Posts: 48,270
    I read they can be found at WalMart and Toys R Us. Price should be in the $5 range, I think.
  • steverstever Posts: 52,462
    "Toy-watchers say the youthful indifference to vehicles that is worrying automakers is also changing the landscape of the playroom: Kids these days just aren’t as into toy cars as they used to be and both industries blame it on the computer. Why hop behind the wheel or run Hot Wheels races on the basement floor when you can Facetime your friends or drive a Formula One car on the LED screen?"

    Toy cars not high on Santa's list anymore (Detroit News)
  • fintailfintail Posts: 48,270
    edited November 2013
    My almost 3 year old niece LOVES toy cars and trucks, and has a collection already - with no input from me. I'm afraid to have her visit me, to see my hoard of cars that are for looking, not playing ;)

    But I suspect nothing will ever match the toy car heyday of the 60s and 70s. Even when I was a kid in the 80s, most kids were gravitating towards TV-movie based stuff, and video games. Video games are everything now. A lot of diecast these days sells to middle aged collector/hoarders (who usually take a bath when it comes time to sell).
  • steverstever Posts: 52,462
    edited November 2013
    My favorite was the Crashmobile. Remember those?

    Your niece needs to learn the Seinfeld turkey trick so she can stuff you into oblivion while she plays with your cars. :D
  • uplanderguyuplanderguy Kent, OHPosts: 11,309
    My absolute favorite Christmas toy was the Playmobile, seen here:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oIDKrmfvLHU

    I saw it at our A&P supermarket. Looking online, I see they were only sold in food and drug stores--weird.

    My mother said I'd sit for hours in front of that thing. Probably partly responsible for who I am today...LOL

    I remember it being roughly '63 when I got it, but several things online are pointing to it being even earlier. Born in '58, hard to believe I'd remember much of anything prior to '63 when I started school, but who knows?

    I know I loved that toy! Engine sound, wipers worked, turn signal indicators lit up--magical!
  • fintailfintail Posts: 48,270
    edited December 2013
    hah, waaaay before my time ;)

    Closest thing to crashed looking toy cars in my day - was this
  • steverstever Posts: 52,462
    Missed those. :)

    Uplander, that's very cool. Also liked the service stations, although I don't think I've ever seen one in real life that had a ramp up for rooftop parking.
  • fintailfintail Posts: 48,270
    I'd hope so, you were probably in your mid-30s when those were new ;)

    You and uplander grew up in the golden age of diecast - IMO, the best years for Matchbox, and some of the most sought after models, were made between 1960-65. A lot of profitable collecting could have been done then.
  • roadburnerroadburner Posts: 12,293
    edited December 2013
    I had a Playmobile as well. As for other toys my uncle was an accountant at Ford and bought a car on A Plan every six months and when he did he would buy me a promo. I have 15 or so in good condition. One of my dad's former students was working as a salesman at a local Ford dealer and gave me this Mustang- which I still have:

    image

    Alas, I was was drawn into the world of foreign cars by Corgi- my first being a Ghia L6.4 V8:

    image

    I also had this Motorific layout as well as this Aurora HO slot car set:

    image

    image

    I wonder why I'm a gearhead...

    Mine: 1995 318ti Club Sport; 2014 M235i; 2009 Cooper Clubman; 1999 Wrangler; 1996 Speed Triple Challenge Cup Replica Wife's: 2015 X1 xDrive28i Son's: 2009 328i

  • steverstever Posts: 52,462
    I don't remember what kind of slot car set I had; the big excitement came when someone opened a big track in an old storefront. It lasted about a year but I mostly would watch - those sponge rubber tires got pricey.

    Need to get Sneakers over here - iirc, he's the one that would reverse the bodies on his cars and make them FWD. They stayed glued to the track.
  • lemkolemko Philadelphia, PAPosts: 15,306
    edited December 2013
    I got this for Xmas in 1972:

    image

    image
  • fintailfintail Posts: 48,270
    edited December 2013
    That Corgi Ghia is one of their more desirable models - mint and boxed, it's worth a good $100 today. Promos are a world of their own, and price can vary based on color. Having boxes helps a lot too, but most of those were tossed when the models were displayed or played with. Generally, the most sought after promos are from 1957-67 or so. Some of the ones from 57-60 or so can warp if not cared for. I had quite a few at one time, but sold most of them off when I was in school. I currently have promos for 62 T-Bird, 63 Galaxie convertible, and ~48 International pickup. About 10 years ago, I found a 61 Ford convertible promo at a yard sale - I had no attachment to it, so I put it on ebay and made 100x my initial investment, not bad.

    Back in the late 80s I had a slot car set, I think the cars were a Testarossa and a Porsche 959.
  • fintailfintail Posts: 48,270
    I've seen those, just before my time. Cars look like a 57 Ford and 57 Nomad? Junky amateur stock cars from the early 70s, I guess. I think those SSP sets have some value these days. Those ripcord cars lived on with other bodies into the 80s, I remember them.
  • uplanderguyuplanderguy Kent, OHPosts: 11,309
    About growing up in the golden age of diecast--I'd agree with that. I loved the Matchbox cars of that era. Even though no one in our family had a Studebaker, I loved that Matchbox Wagonaire right away--even then I think I knew it was pretty rare and/or that Stude had left the U.S. by the time the toy was out. I remember a kid in 3rd grade ('66-67) whose mom would pick him up in a light brown '64 Wagonaire. Even then I thought it was cool.

    I also liked the Matchbox Lincoln Continental and '64 Pontiac Grand Prix, particularly.

    I remember a metal Tonka Jeep toy. I seem to remember being cut on it one time. Of course, I was told to play more carefully! LOL
  • uplanderguyuplanderguy Kent, OHPosts: 11,309
    Roadburner, about what year would you put your Playmobile at? Just curious.

    My parents bought a new '67 Chevelle in March of that year. I remember calling my grandfather across town and ribbing him, as for once we had a newer car than he did. Two months later he bought a new Impala Sport Coupe, much nicer than our low-line, four-door Chevelle. He called me back to rib me! He also bought me the promo '67 Camaro Indy Pace Car, which didn't survive my early-teen model car purge, sadly.
  • lemkolemko Philadelphia, PAPosts: 15,306
    Speaking of the Wagonaire, I just saw one of those recent GMC SUVs with the rollback roof hauling an upright oven.
  • uplanderguyuplanderguy Kent, OHPosts: 11,309
    Before that GMC Envoy was introduced, I was told by the Archivist at the Studebaker National Museum that GM had requested and paid for copies of blueprints of the Wagonaire's top. Seriously.
  • roadburnerroadburner Posts: 12,293
    I'd say I received my Playmobile sometime between 1962 and 1964.

    Mine: 1995 318ti Club Sport; 2014 M235i; 2009 Cooper Clubman; 1999 Wrangler; 1996 Speed Triple Challenge Cup Replica Wife's: 2015 X1 xDrive28i Son's: 2009 328i

  • fintailfintail Posts: 48,270
    The Matchbox Wagonaire (42a) started production in 1965, and was made through 1968-69. It is from what I call the "mass market" years - when sales were huge, the cars were widely available, and they really became a household name. The castings became a little more detailed, but also standardized, with less variety. Due to high production, most models from this era are not hard to find even mint in box - the Studebaker can usually be had for around $35/boxed. The Lincoln can be had for similar money, the Pontiac sometimes a little more, but barely. There were also one or two other British made diecast Wagonaires, maybe the Brits took a liking to the design.

    Some of the big value Matchbox are from the late 50s through about 1965, much more variation. It's models from that era that often get into the several hundred dollar range, and sometimes more.
  • uplanderguyuplanderguy Kent, OHPosts: 11,309
    edited December 2013
    I have a Corgi Wagonaire also, with a TV cameraman in the back. I think I paid $15 or $20 for it at Hershey several years back. I bought a Matchbox Wagonaire on eBay a decade ago for ten or twelve bucks I think, but I didn't get the plastic hunter or dog that came with it originally.

    Corgi:

    http://billstudepage.homestead.com/files/huscam.jpg

    Apparently UPI bought Wagonaires to film from the back of; hence the Corgi model.

    http://i706.photobucket.com/albums/ww63/dstnkmp/1963%20Wagonaire%20Slideshow%20I- - I/cameras.jpg

    The cars in the link are '63's; the Matchbox and Corgi Wagonaires are '64's or '65's.
  • steverstever Posts: 52,462
    Wonder if that's where Walt Disney really got his inspiration for Mickey Mouse.
  • uplanderguyuplanderguy Kent, OHPosts: 11,309
    Yeah, really.
  • fintailfintail Posts: 48,270
    I have over 200 boxed cars, but I don't have a Wagonaire - too new for me. I have very little made from 1965 onward, and what I do have was usually acquired by accident.

    Corgi and Dinky made other Studebakers too, probably because they were exported to the UK, and the styling was modern.
  • lemkolemko Philadelphia, PAPosts: 15,306
    I have these two:

    image

    image
  • PF_FlyerPF_Flyer Pennsylvania Furnace, PAPosts: 9,292
    I still have some of my old slot cars from the 60's in a box in the attic. I had a Chapparal that my Dad and I reversed the chassis on to make it a front wheel drive. That also moved the motor and center of gravity WAY forward and made it corner like a demon. Also have a Corvair dragster that we rewound the motor on. Thing could not go around any kind of corner, but was built strictly for the drag races we had at the one hobby shop.

    Ah, the golden age of slot cars!! I'll have to find them and post some photos

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  • berriberri Posts: 10,166
    Nice. That bamboo roof look makes me think Kaiser though!
  • uplanderguyuplanderguy Kent, OHPosts: 11,309
    edited December 2013
    I have the Golden Hawk and that is a really nice model I think, although I'm not crazy in general with Golden Hawks. They used it to make a nice (OK, relative term) bright blue Packard Hawk model; wish they'd do the same and do a Gran Turismo Hawk. OK, it still has DNA from the '53, but the Gran Turismo is my favorite Studebaker.

    I also have the gold supercharged Avanti Franklin Mint car, but I wish I had the turquoise one they released later.

    A little off the subject, but I remember seeing a Franklin Mint light green '61 Ford Country Squire, with a picnic basket and brighly colored beach ball in the back, at a store near here that used to sell them. Very neat.

    I'm not familiar with that 'Bullet Nose' model; looks very nice. My brother-in-law has a real nice yellow '49 Champion Convert, real car, that won its class at our regional show near here a few months back.
  • steverstever Posts: 52,462
    Look at These Amazing Exploded Views of Classic Sports Cars

    Neat pics - you can view the gallery in real life if you head over to Switzerland.
  • writerwriter Posts: 121
    Ok, I just found out about this. Now that I am posting it, I guess everybody is going say "gee, where have you been? Of course we all knew about it."

    Fine. It's new to me.
    :-)

    Miniatur Wunderland Hamburg
  • fintailfintail Posts: 48,270
    I've heard of it but never been there. I love things like that though.

    There's a huge model railroad layout at the Swiss Transport Museum in Luzern that I have visited - here's something I zoomed in on, an HO scale crash involving a MB W111 coupe (coupe version of my car):

    image

    Oh, today I stopped at a Wally World (bought something Made in USA there, shocking), and noticed the entire Matchbox stock was depleted, not a single car on the pegs. Hot Wheels was sparse, too. Toy cars might still be selling.
  • fintailfintail Posts: 48,270
    Speaking of what I call "golden age" Matchbox, this set recently ended on ebay. A little out of my price range, but what a cool set. This was probably made in 1962.
  • writerwriter Posts: 121
    After a lot of poking around I found out that the Hamburg MW is done in 1/87th scale. I am not sure how strict they are. I am guessing that it is fairly strict 1/87th since they are so big that they might want to be able to swap around pieces between display areas.
  • fintailfintail Posts: 48,270
    edited December 2013
    I'd bet it is very strict. HO scale is definitely dominant in Germany - toy shops still have large train + accessory sections there, often the lineup of HO scale cars and trucks will fill most of a wall. There's an amazing variety of vehicles.

    Here's a finely detailed 1:87 fintail I bought in Germany:

    image

    image

    image
  • berriberri Posts: 10,166
    So did MB actually produce cars in that pea soup green? To each their own, but something I'd more expect as a one year Ford color (always seemed to me that Fomoco can really put out an odd one sometimes).
  • fintailfintail Posts: 48,270
    Maybe not exactly, But fintails could be had in a wide variety of colors

    That green color does scream "1971" to me.
  • writerwriter Posts: 121
    I looked through the color patches. The closest appears to be DB824 "Sea Green". What is going on with the water over there?
    :-)
  • lemkolemko Philadelphia, PAPosts: 15,306
    image
  • berriberri Posts: 10,166
    I like that greaser with the wrap around shades in the driver's seat :-)
  • fintailfintail Posts: 48,270
    Cool. Looks like a new item, 1:32 scale?

    Revell has a couple fintail slot cars in that scale:

    image
  • lemkolemko Philadelphia, PAPosts: 15,306

    Tonka used to make pretty nice Jeep pickup and Wagoneer toys. I had a Tonka car carrier that held about five of these:

    image

  • fintailfintail Posts: 48,270
    edited December 2013

    Matchbox had a lovely casting of a Jeep pickup, introduced late 1964 I think:

  • berriberri Posts: 10,166

    I always liked the old Jeep and Willy's FC pick-ups. very different looking - both of them for their time. When I was a kid you'd frequently see either of these with a snow plow at a gas station or mall. (of course that Matchbox is a newer version which I didn't like as much as the older ones - but I wonder if it's more modern looks improved sales?)

  • uplanderguyuplanderguy Kent, OHPosts: 11,309

    I remember that that era of Jeep pickup was called 'Gladiator'. I like them because they're different. Concerning the Jeep FC pickup--I remember a school bus yellow one that could drive on railroad tracks, always parked outside our Erie Lackawanna train station in little Greenville, PA. Also, the former Jeep dealer in our town had dementia and lived in the same assisted-living place my mother did. I mentioned to him in passing that I liked the forward-control models and right away, he said, "FC, yes" and it was like that rang a bell for him.

  • lemkolemko Philadelphia, PAPosts: 15,306

    Slick Fisher-Price station wagon:

  • fintailfintail Posts: 48,270

    Cute. Before my time, but I can see the charm. Some F-P toys have collectible value, especially if in the original box.

    Speaking of boxes, I want this - but wouldn't pay nearly that much for it.

    @lemko said:
    Slick Fisher-Price station wagon:

  • fintailfintail Posts: 48,270
    edited January 2014

    I recently got this Matchbox W111 220SE (fintail coupe) in a lucky buy it now auction:

    I have a couple of these already, but none this nice or in as good a box, or in this dark color (others are more red). The scale of this is quite small, I would estimate around 1:70 or so. With that color and silver wheels, was probably produced in 1963.

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