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Buying American Cars What Does It Mean?

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Comments

  • roadburnerroadburner Posts: 12,253
    edited June 8
    I pretty much abandoned the Big 3 in the mid to late '80s- as at that time it appeared that their shared goal was to switch most every model they produced to FWD(see: Mustang/Probe). Even now, aside from a couple of Jeeps(GC, Wrangler) the only current American cars I'd seriously consider would be the Bullitt, GT350, or a Hellcat Widebody

    Mine: 1995 318ti Club Sport; 2014 M235i; 2009 Cooper Clubman; 1999 Wrangler; 1996 Speed Triple Challenge Cup Replica Wife's: 2015 X1 xDrive28i Son's: 2009 328i

  • imidazol97imidazol97 Crossroads of America I70 & I75 Posts: 23,619
    berri said:

    Most big industry is global these days. That is why tariffs will mostly end up just driving up prices for consumers. .

    However, the converse is that the companies not having production in the US, for various products of the S&P as cited, actually has imposed a tariff (tax) on those who used to make a living from the manufacturing jobs. So the costs to the residents of those areas that used to have manufacturing jobs, such as Ohio, has been in lower wages, people not even finding jobs, people turning to SS and disability--itself a tax on the other taxpayers, and people ending up with various drug habits and overdosing. Some areas of the country have been bearing the tariff, tax, so that others could have cheaper products.

    There are two sides to the tariff idea: the tariffs that weren't collected for the last 20 years and the cost to the people is one not mentioned in the MSM.

    2015 Cruze 2LT, 2014 Malibu 2LT, 2008 Cobalt 2LT

  • imidazol97imidazol97 Crossroads of America I70 & I75 Posts: 23,619
    edited June 8
    berri said:

    However, I think you are looking backwards when you state the Big 3 suck. The statistical difference in Consumers Reports between above average and average reliability is not nearly as steep as just 5 or 10 years ago. There are a lot of good vehicles out there today from all kinds of manufacturer's.

    Agree. And the dealer often makes the difference in how they handle some of the problems.



    2015 Cruze 2LT, 2014 Malibu 2LT, 2008 Cobalt 2LT

  • fintailfintail Posts: 48,093
    Funny thing though, not all products consumers have abandoned domestic makers for are necessarily cheaper (see Euro cars).

    I can't think of any media source that isn't mainstream in some way. These days we have defacto state-sponsored media, too.
  • berriberri Posts: 10,140
    It would be nice if tariffs increased US jobs and salaries, but I wouldn't bet on it. First, US plants are much more technology advanced, so as witnessed when US Steel reopened its Granite City (I believe) plant, only a fraction of previous employees were brought in. Second, US companies are already scouting out new offshore locations like Vietnam. As for salaries, we are at almost record full employment as a nation right now, and there is still little salary growth. The real winners are the executives and shareholders, not the workers financially. What high tariffs will do here primarily is raise consumer prices, and perhaps the tariff revenues will offset some of the tax cut lost revenues to the US Treasury. Bottom line: my bet is the middle and lower class end up absorbing the larger share of negative impact from the tariffs. Calvin Coolege and Herbert Hoover tried this tariff thing before and it ultimately led to the great depression. Trade between countries has been in existence for centuries.
  • fintailfintail Posts: 48,093
    I won't get too much into what I think about tariffs, as it quickly veers into politics. I will say that AFAIK, not one credible economist or similar will claim tariffs have ever created real benefit for workers in general. No reason to think it will be different this time. Just a distraction from other current issues.
  • andres3andres3 Southern CAPosts: 10,970
    berri said:

    Most big industry is global these days. That is why tariffs will mostly end up just driving up prices for consumers. If you look at the S&P 500; many, many of the listed companies derive a substantial chunk of their revenues from outside the US these days. You should have pointed out that many of those "foreign" brands are actually produced in the US nowadays.

    However, I think you are looking backwards when you state the Big 3 suck. The statistical difference in Consumers Reports between above average and average reliability is not nearly as steep as just 5 or 10 years ago. There are a lot of good vehicles out there today from all kinds of manufacturer's.

    I did use the word "suck" in the past tense "sucked." So fair enough they have improved, but they still seem to suffer from unacceptable lemony models here and there.
    '16 Audi TTS quattro 2.0T, '15 Audi A4 quattro 2.0T, '19 VW Tiguan SEL 4-Motion AWD
  • tlongtlong CaliforniaPosts: 5,192

    berri said:

    Most big industry is global these days. That is why tariffs will mostly end up just driving up prices for consumers. .

    However, the converse is that the companies not having production in the US, for various products of the S&P as cited, actually has imposed a tariff (tax) on those who used to make a living from the manufacturing jobs. So the costs to the residents of those areas that used to have manufacturing jobs, such as Ohio, has been in lower wages, people not even finding jobs, people turning to SS and disability--itself a tax on the other taxpayers, and people ending up with various drug habits and overdosing. Some areas of the country have been bearing the tariff, tax, so that others could have cheaper products.

    There are two sides to the tariff idea: the tariffs that weren't collected for the last 20 years and the cost to the people is one not mentioned in the MSM.

    Yes but at least those areas still have some jobs.
    Once trade became global, the cost disparities have driven a lot of business offshore. The foreign nameplates have at least set up a lot of factories here. Better than no jobs at all.
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