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Honda Civic: Problems & Solutions

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Comments

  • gregoryc1gregoryc1 Posts: 766
    But the inside of the engine will be very clean, and a "clean engine" is a "happy engine"! The factory also recommends a 10,000 mile oil change, and oil filter service every other oil change, for "normal service". With that "logic" I DO NOT trust the factory engineers with designing a sound / state of the art preventive maintenance program. In addition, these same factory engineers, are the ones who designed the V6 automatic transmission for the Accord! YES, it does cost some money to maintain a vehicle properly. When I was younger, I would work on my own car and change my oil & filter. I no longer have the desire to do this type of work, so I let the dealer perform the service. I now have 42,000 + on a 2003 Accord. When I pull the dip stick to check the oil level, the oil is as clean as when the vehicle was new.(This vehicle is only 23 months old). That is the way it should be for the life of the vehicle.
  • gee35coupegee35coupe Posts: 3,475
    adequate maintenance, why buy the car in the first place? There are a lot of other areas of the car that require periodic checking. If you don't trust something as basic as oil changes you might as well start trying the disassemble the "maintenenace free" wheel bearings and installing grease fittings so you can give those suspension bushings a quick lube job.

     

    I have 26.3k on my Civic Si and it runs like new even though it's had oil changes at 9500, 18000, and will have the next one next week. I seriously doubt my engine is going to sieze by 100k as the Doomsday preachers predict.
  • ruking1ruking1 Posts: 19,825
    I would agree. I have a Honda Civic and will go to Mobil One 0w20 after running the OEM fill. I have no issues with 5/10k intervals. As soon as the meager warranty of 3yr/36k is over I will also go to a min of 15k to 20k oil and filter intervals. My mileage horizon is 250,000 and above.
  • theracoontheracoon Posts: 666
    ...on the 91 DX hatch, and 94 Coupe EX it was 7500 miles.[snip]

     

    Is Honda shortening their factory recommended interval? I wonder why that is.


     

    On my '99 CR-V the "normal" interval is 7,500 miles and the "severe" interval is 3,750 miles. I suspect it was the same for your '91 and '94.

     

    On newer Hondas the "normal" interval is 10,000 miles and the "severe" interval is 5,000 miles. So the intervals are longer, not shorter.

     

    :)
  • lraclrac Posts: 4
    My son's 1991 Civic LX 4-door 5-speed manual with 160,000 miles just developed an erratic tachometer.

     

    At highway speeds (70-75 MPH) the normal tach reading of just under 4,000 RPM began fluctuating between 2,000 and 5,000 with no noticable change in actual engine RPM.

     

    No other symtoms were apparent, engine temp was normal and operation seemed normal.

     

    Can anyone suggest problem, trouble shooting and solution?
  • andyman73andyman73 Posts: 368
    "back yard bandit" I thought as much....I mean technology marches on...I didn't think that Honda would be shortening the intervals....that would be crazy! :)

     

    I think my Ford is 3K, just got car from wife, and put in Mobil 1, so it's gonna get the 5Kplus oil change treatment. Her new Merc. Sable w/Duratec 30 recommends 5K and synthetic. Good to know someone is thinking straight, somewhere.:)
  • gregoryc1gregoryc1 Posts: 766
    Not all technology is "good"! Look at the 2.7 Chrysler / Dodge engine sludge issue!
  • It could be just some wiring gone bad or something came loose. The tach is just hooked up to some kind of engine wire that went to the distributor to measure the engine speed, or something like that. If the wiring is similar from the 91-95, it is a blue wire you want to look for coming out of the distributor, as this was the color of mine in my 95 Civic DX. I installed a tach on this car since it didn't have one and I tapped into that blue wire to get an engine speed reading. That is the only thing I can think of since I have some personal experience with that department. The good thing in your situation is its just a faulty gauge reading and not something mechanical that is affecting the way the car is driving. Good luck though.
  • andyman73andyman73 Posts: 368
    Too true!!! I read on one of the forums around here somewhere, that the 2.7 is the most expensive motor they make for the bigger car lineup. More than the 3.5 or the 5.7Hemi. That's too bad.

     

    Didn't Toyota have a sludge problem with their 3.0?
  • gregoryc1gregoryc1 Posts: 766
    Go on the "net" and search under;--- "Chrysler Dodge Durango Issues". Hit "enter" and you will have hours of reading! Your are correct about Toyota, but VW also has an issue. 3,000 miles is the limit for most vehicles with regards to oil and filter changes. Some engines like the 2.7 could benefit from 2,000 mile service intervals and synthetic oil. In addition, an engine oil cooler might also help with regards to this 2.7 engine problem. Honda's 5,000 or 10,000 mile oil change interval is a "pipe dream"! Engine oil is used to lubricate, clean, cool and seal the engine. Clean oil does a "great job", dirty / contaminated oil does not perform properly. Many auto manufacturers are not honoring their warranty if "sludge" is found in the engine, (even if the oil change intervals as stated in the "owner's manual" were followed). They blame the issue on "owner neglect". Their position is that; ----- if your operating conditions were that severe, you should have changed your oil sooner than stated in the manual. In addition, you as the owner better have all you service receipts if you want warranty service. This is why I let my Honda dealer perform all the preventive maintenance on our 2003 Accord and 2004 Civic. To put it simply, it is their oil, their filters and their technicians doing the service. I change the oil and filter at 3,000 miles rather than at 5,000 or 10,000 miles. If this engine should develop "sludge", it is not my problem. Should a problem occur on a trip, all my service records could be accessed through the Honda Computer network. It makes my life "stupid / simple"! I have always received excellent service from our dealer. To date we have owned five Honda vehicles, starting with a 1997 Accord. I believe that Honda makes an outstanding product, but like any vehicle, it needs a "state of the art preventive maintenance program" to keep it running in a "like new condition"!
  • Karen_SKaren_S Posts: 5,092
    Before this goes on another "oil" tangent, let me remind everyone (once again!) that this topic is strictly about Honda Civic problems and solutions. If you wish to discuss any other make/model, please do so in its designated topic, which you can find by using the search function.
  • ruking1ruking1 Posts: 19,825
    ..."Honda's 5,000 or 10,000 mile oil change interval is a "pipe dream"! "...

     

    My take is more like: the 3k oil changes are more like belt and suspenders type of "dreaming"

     

    Lets just put it this way, Honda is not above trying to deny REMOTE engine warranty claims within the meager warranty period of 3 years/ 36,000 miles.

     

    Thankfully, Honda DOES NOT unlike some of Toyota's have engines that operate at temperatures that literally "COOK" the oil, that will over time cause coking. The real long term answer is redesign those engines that operate OUT of the heat range the oil is designed to run. Since Toyota's warranty is 3 years or 36,000 miles, and they really DID/do NOT want to redesign it or recall them, their answer is to change the oil more often, which does ABSOLUTELY NOTHING about the oil "cooking" and then coking. They basically cover the real PITA people with the "secret" warranty.

     

    While I understand the host/hostess wants to stay on topic, to me it is pretty germane in that I was pretty sour about certain Toyota's from my own experiences with the Toyota Camry 1985 at app the 75,000 mile mark. So this is by no means a new problem. (2005-1985)=20 years.

     

    I changed oil religiously between 2,500-3,000 miles(Catrol GTX). This of course did NOTHING to stop the massive coking. The neatest thing from Toyota's point of view is at 36,001 ANY engine repairs are now on YOUR nickel. So at app 75,000 miles when a part of the engine failed and let all the oil stream out they steadfastly stuck to their position that the warranty was indeed up. As they began the tear down procedure to assess the damage, it was more than easy to see the engine was massively coked up. Just this portion of the repairs started off at 1,500 and then ended up at app 2700 dollars.

     

    Needless to say I was not very pleased. I have to say however in all fairness, they did invoke the "secret warranty". (Perhaps I met their criterion for being a PITA. :) ) Unbeknownst to me this model also had brake pad and rotor and suspension problems. They at no charge replaced the brake pads, rotors, springs, shocks, and struts, etc.

     

    I also at the time had a Honda Accord manual transmission that in effect ran like a top, but I did get rid of it also, due to guilt by association of being a 4 cylinder engine. : ( :).

     

    Upshot is this is a round about way of saying for a number of years I would not go near these belt driven 4 cylinder engines!

     

    So the upshot is 1. don't get the engines that cook oil and then coke 2. Honda Civic (the one I have) does not have the engines that do this 3. I am good to go to 9/10k on ExxonMobil Superflo5w20 or to 20,000 after the meager warranty period of 3 years/36,000 miles with Mobil One 0w20.
  • hatchhatch Posts: 2
    Hi everyone, and happy new year!

    I have a 1995 very basic Civic Hatchback DX, no power steering, manual drive. Overall it is in very good shape and I do take good care of it (this a 'previously owned' car). But I found out the radiator has a "slight leak" and it will cost more than $500 to replace it. I looked into buying a Honda radiator for my model and found one online for a pretty good price, but the garage I use refuses to install it. I know that having a perfect radiator is of critical importance, but I also don't have more than $500 to replace it right now. It's winter, does that help keep the engine cool? Are there any effective, short-term solutions? Thank all of you for your help.
  • ruking1ruking1 Posts: 19,825
    Short term, it might be as simple as hose and hose clamps not doing their job. If you have cracks in the radiator it can be spot welded. Not to be the bearer of bad news, for folks have a tendency to shoot the messenger, at the worst:long term, it is just a matter of when you will have to replace it!

     

    So if a radiator costs say 200-250 dollars that means shop time of 250-300 at your areas going rate.(3 hrs app)

     

    I replaced one on a Toyota Landcruiser, after being welded in serveral places and times, but the part wholesale was 399. and it was 200 in labor. The problem occurred at the 12 year mark and very close to 214k miles.
  • hatchhatch Posts: 2
    Hi ruking1,

    Thank you for the info. I know the radiator itself has cracks, but that the leaking is not too bad. I didn't mention spot welding, but my mechanic didn't mention spot welding as an option when I asked if there were short-term solutions. I don't drive a lot, but do need a dependable vehicle when I do, and I certainly don't want to kill the motor. And I realize I will have to replace the radiator eventually, but I would like to put it off for a while if I can.
  • ruking1ruking1 Posts: 19,825
    That being true, I would take corrective actions like making sure on a short periodic schedule that the fluids were TOPPED UP. So carry distilled water and antifreeze, or carry premixed (50/50) antifreeze and distilled water. Needless to say, this is not the best solution, but I understand what you are trying to accomplish.
  • I just purchased 2 cabin filters for my 01 Civic at the outrageous price of $28.30. They are really cheap quality and probably cost 50 cents to make. Any ideas as to low cost solution? How necessary are they?
  • ruking1ruking1 Posts: 19,825
    Lower cost (19) yes but still low demand makes it pricey.
  • john500john500 Posts: 409
    If you are on a budget, the first thing that I would do is buy a container of radiator "stop leak" for about $5 at your local automotive parts store. This stuff worked pretty well for older model cars (1980-1990's)-haven't tried it on newer model cars.
  • gee35coupegee35coupe Posts: 3,475
    The radiator should be an easy swap in that car. It's not that big and from what I remember about my 93', the fasteners and hoses were pretty easy ro get to.
  • blueiedgodblueiedgod Posts: 2,798
    Hi everyone, and happy new year!

    I have a 1995 very basic Civic Hatchback DX, no power steering, manual drive. Overall it is in very good shape and I do take good care of it (this a 'previously owned' car). But I found out the radiator has a "slight leak" and it will cost more than $500 to replace it. I looked into buying a Honda radiator for my model and found one online for a pretty good price, but the garage I use refuses to install it. I know that having a perfect radiator is of critical importance, but I also don't have more than $500 to replace it right now. It's winter, does that help keep the engine cool? Are there any effective, short-term solutions? Thank all of you for your help.


     

    If I am not mistaken the 1995 has the "half sized" radiator, where the A/c core and radiator are side by side, instead of one behind the other. Replacing a radiator is even easier with this configuration. The online dealer's price for OEM radiator (Denso) is $201.

    You would have to look at it to see if you have to remove the bulkhead or just undo the bushings and slide it out, after disonnecting the hoses and removing the fan. I replaced a few radiators on varyous Honda's and it may take you, the first time, a good portion of a saturday morning. After a while you can do it with the eyes closed.

     

    try these for cheaper OEM parts

    East coast: http://www.fairhondapartsforyou.com/(Connecticut), http://www.hondaautomotiveparts.com/auto/jsp/mws/catdisplay.jsp (Rhode Island)

    Mid West http://www.hparts.com (Oklahoma)

    West coast http://www.handa-accessories.com/

     

    The reason I offer the dealer by locality is because they may give you free shipping if you are in their region. I can vouch for Fairhondapartsforyou, I was so impressed with their service, that I ended up buying my Si from them. If you call them and buy from them mention to John that Dave (black Si) sent you, and he will cut you a better deal. I have sent a lot of people there. I think a few from Edmunds actually ended up buying cars from them too.

     

    HandA are good too, but they are on the west coast and shiping take a week and costs a bit.

     

    Most of them would not list the parts on the website, except for Majestic Honda, so you would have to call them.

    I have bought from Hparts back in the late 90's, they were the pioneers of the OEM internet parts dealers.

     

    The "stop leak" is a very temporary solution and may clog up the cooling passages in the engine. All it is a bunch of copper flakes with some binder that "supposedly/allegedly" seals up the leaks from the inside. Would you in the right mind put metal flakes in your cooling system? I wouldn't. This is for a crooked used car salesman to seel a junker that does not leak on the parking lot. If you really want a temporary solution, that would not harm the engine, seal it form the outside with JB weld, but once summer comes, you would still need a new radiator.

     

    Don't forget that you can not use generic antifreeze, when buying radiator (if you do go ahead with replacement) ask them for the HOnda OEM 50/50 antifreeze. Honda water pumps are very sensitive to silicates present in regular "off the shelf" antifreeze. Silicates act as abrasive in the water pump.

     

    If you are new to Honda, there a re few fluids that should only be OEM: Antifreeze, power steering fluid (does not apply to you), ATF fluid (does not apply to you), and rear differential fluid (does not apply to you)

     

    Good luck.

     

    P.S. You can get a Chilton, Hayes or Helms repair manual for your car. Helms is the best, but also the priciest ($70), Hayes is OK and decent price, Chilton is the least attractive but cheap ($10 at auto zone).
  • Are they necessary? I suppose that you could consider them a luxury item, these type filters first appeared in the higher end cars. Historically, air entered from the outside of the car and was blown or circulated to the inside without filtration. There are many cars that still do this today. If you decide to leave the old ones in place, gradually the air flow from the outside will decrease as the filter clogs. If you remove them and don't replace, ducts, vents, etc. will start accumulating dust, pollen, etc. Probably have the odd insect carcasse make it through from time to time. For a lot of people this is not a problem. If you are lucky enough to live in the Southeast in the spring time, you might be greated with a blast of pollen first thing in the morning.

    Up to you, I guess I like the luxury and keep replacing mine. I have noticed recently in my local autoparts store that one of the aftermarket vendors has a part number for the cabin filter. My store didn't stock, so not sure of the price.
  • ruking1ruking1 Posts: 19,825
    Judging by my VW Jetta TDI charcoal cabin filter at 47,000 miles, I would say no, they are not necessary. It is not like your engine is ingesting and combusting "silicon" particles that might affect the wear of your engine. If the price of the 2 filters is a shocker, I would just double/triple the change out time and/or vacuum them clean and put them back in.
  • blueiedgodblueiedgod Posts: 2,798
    For people with allergies, a HEPA filter is a must. I think the Si cabin filters are HEPA, but I am not 100% sure. I just know that in the spring I don't feel like I am ready to sneeze my brains out after driving for an hour in the mountains. To me, the cost is minimal on the grand scheme of things. You just spent $15,000-$20,000 on a car, what is another $20-40 once a year? The cost of your gas, oil tires, brakes, and other maintenance items are much greater than the cabin filter. If you are not ready for those expenses, maybe you should have stayed with the old clunker you had before.

     

    On-linde parts dealers may sell the filters cheaper, I don't remember how much it was exactly from Fair Honda, but it was cheaper than retail.
  • ron_mron_m Posts: 188
    Three weeks ago I purchased a 2001 Civic LX for my wife. This vehicle had everything that she wanted with the exception of a center armrest. Have any of you retrofitted a center armrest for your 2001 Civic LX 4-door sedan? I haven't priced one yet--and really don't even know if any of the 2001 Civic models had a center armrest. So, that's the main question. Could you get a center armrest in a 2001 Civic LX 4-door sedan? If so, do you feel as though it would be fairly easy to install one in a Civic that was built without one?

     

    Ron M.
  • user777user777 Posts: 3,341
    why don't you click on the H and A banner at the top and follow the links to Honda, Civic and Armrest, then View Installation Instructions? ;)
  • blueiedgodblueiedgod Posts: 2,798
    Three weeks ago I purchased a 2001 Civic LX for my wife. This vehicle had everything that she wanted with the exception of a center armrest. Have any of you retrofitted a center armrest for your 2001 Civic LX 4-door sedan? I haven't priced one yet--and really don't even know if any of the 2001 Civic models had a center armrest. So, that's the main question. Could you get a center armrest in a 2001 Civic LX 4-door sedan? If so, do you feel as though it would be fairly easy to install one in a Civic that was built without one?

      

    Ron M.


     

    You can probably install Center console from the EX. I don't see why it would not fit. It has armrest and storage compartments.

     

    P.S. Like the previous poster said, go to the top banner and get the arm rest from the site sponsor. Not a bad deal for $42.

     

    http://www.handa-accessories.com/civint01.html
  • sp0tsp0t Posts: 4
    I own a 1998 Honda Civic EX automatic. I got it from an auction so therefore I didn't get a chance to test drive it. It's a great car and I haven't had any problems with it. I was wondering, though, if any drivers of this model have had any problems with brake sensitivity? Does anyone know if the ABS has anything to do with brake sensitivity? The car that I drove before I purchased my Honda had brakes that were much more sensitive. When I'm driving my Honda and I come to a complete stop I'm constantly putting pressure on the brake pedal to keep the vehicle from rolling. The slightest release of pressure from the brake pedal lets the car roll. The car that I drove before my Honda, however, when I would come to a complete stop I could release some pressure from the brake pedal so my foot wasn't constantly pushing down on the brake pedal so hard. The previous car would stay put when I released a little pressure from the brake pedal. Any ideas of why the brakes in the Honda aren't very sensitive or are they supposed to be like that?
  • dave28dave28 Posts: 1
    So, the remote access FOB on our 1997 EX has gotten a lot weaker. The distance to the car for it to work has become about two feet away. Replaced the battery. Didn't change anything. Took it to dealer, replaced the whole key FOB, did NOTHING! Dealer is stumped. I think it must be the RECEIVER, by process of elimination. But where is the receiver in the car, and what can we do to replace/fix it? Other ideas? By the way we tried it in various locations thinking it might be electronic interference. No difference...
  • isellhondasisellhondas Issaquah WashingtonPosts: 20,225
    This doesn't sound normal. Have a competent shop check your brakes. Nothing to fool with.
  • blueiedgodblueiedgod Posts: 2,798
    I own a 1998 Honda Civic EX automatic. I got it from an auction so therefore I didn't get a chance to test drive it. It's a great car and I haven't had any problems with it. I was wondering, though, if any drivers of this model have had any problems with brake sensitivity? Does anyone know if the ABS has anything to do with brake sensitivity? The car that I drove before I purchased my Honda had brakes that were much more sensitive. When I'm driving my Honda and I come to a complete stop I'm constantly putting pressure on the brake pedal to keep the vehicle from rolling. The slightest release of pressure from the brake pedal lets the car roll. The car that I drove before my Honda, however, when I would come to a complete stop I could release some pressure from the brake pedal so my foot wasn't constantly pushing down on the brake pedal so hard. The previous car would stay put when I released a little pressure from the brake pedal. Any ideas of why the brakes in the Honda aren't very sensitive or are they supposed to be like that?

     

    Check the brake pads for wear, change the brake fluid, check the rotors for wear. The actual numbers are in the Helms shop manual. Since you bought the car at auction, you probably don't know the history, might as well do a complete tune up, not the cheapo $40 at the gas station, but the one by the book for the closest 15,000 mile interval (15,000-30,000-45,000-60,000-75,000.. and so on)
  • blueiedgodblueiedgod Posts: 2,798
    So, the remote access FOB on our 1997 EX has gotten a lot weaker. The distance to the car for it to work has become about two feet away. Replaced the battery. Didn't change anything. Took it to dealer, replaced the whole key FOB, did NOTHING! Dealer is stumped. I think it must be the RECEIVER, by process of elimination. But where is the receiver in the car, and what can we do to replace/fix it? Other ideas? By the way we tried it in various locations thinking it might be electronic interference. No difference...

     

    If memory serves me right, the keyless entry receiver is in the stock radio on the 97 EX. Many people found out that they lost keyless entry when they upgraded to aftermarket radios. Some shops, would leave the radio behind the dash, and wire the sound to the new radio while leaving the leyless wired to the old radio.

     

    Considering the cost of the stock radio at the dealer, it may be much cheaper to install an aftermarket alarm with keyless entry option. The rage on those is quite long, and you get an alarm as well. BJ's/Costco have a remote car starter with alarm and keyless entry for DIY for $80 some.
  • I have had my Civic '03 for about a year. I have had two alignments, various tires rotations but I never was able to "solve" my Civic "pulling" problem. Sometimes, left often right. If I'm on a road that absolutely flat in general it is OK. However in CA almost all roads are in fairly poor shape. The Goodyears I got with the car were pretty new so I didn't have to heart to replace them only to find out that WASN'T the problem, however NOW it is time to replace them and was wondering if there is a BRAND that may be "best".

     

    Sometimes, especially to the right, the car pulls BADLY. Sometimes I even have to drive with the sterring wheel "cocked" to a degree. The alignments always showed it was in "specs" so I just assumed there was something wrong with the tires and now finely (hopefully) the problem will be resolved. (NOTE, yes the pressure was checked in tires, could " balancing" have been the problem? I was told NO by a "tire guy" so I never thought more about it, but the more I think about it now, the more it seems at least like a possibly.)

     

    Can you give me some insight??
  • ruking1ruking1 Posts: 19,825
    Well, unfortunately CA is known for having some of the worst roads in the country. :(

     

    I have a 2004 Civic VP with 5000 miles and it tracks straight as an arrow except for highly crowned roads- where it does tend to track more to the right. You don't mention your rotation cycles, but in the Honda it is like 10,000 miles. So either you are traveling a lot of miles or rotating your tires too much. Rotations can be a catch 22 in that when you rotate them to the new position, it will track differently. The good news is that it evens out the wear, the bad news is that particular position will continue to wear the tire down.
  • I kept rotating them to try and figure out what the heck is going on. I eventually gave up. Well, I need new tires anyway, so I just hope that straightens out the problem. The wear on the tires is totally fine, except for the tread depth obviously, leading me think the alignment isn't the problem. Something about these tires seems to make the car wander dramically, though as stated above, sometimes it doesn't if the road is TOTALLY flat. But how often can you count on that??
  • gee35coupegee35coupe Posts: 3,475
    a tire that pulls. Even name brands make tires that are off spec.
  • What I mean is the car "drifts ALOT" is what I mean by "pull."
  • gee35coupegee35coupe Posts: 3,475
    http://www.babcox.com/editorial/tr/tr50244.htm

     

    When you have a bad tires causing pulling issues.
  • Way back in the day, my dad had a 92 Plymouth Voyager, RIP 2002. Anyhow I remember we had some new tires put on it, and when we left the tire place, the wheel pulled sharply to the left. We had a bad tire put on the car, and the tire was brand new. Sometimes defective equipment can come right out of the factory, and that sounds like what may have happened to you. We went back to the tire shop, they replaced one of the tires, and the problem was corrected.
  • Getting Closer:) Thanks guys. Where do you guys (and gals) get your tires? I want to do this right.
  • ruking1ruking1 Posts: 19,825
    Unfortunately I think sometimes when somehow you get all defects together, it can be frustrating and puzzling. So I mean stuff like defective or out of round tire, tp pressure differences, low pressure, high pressure, alignment problems, balance problems, springs, shocks and struts brake pads and rotors, etc etc. One is not enough to cause much of a stir but when you put them all together.... or a lot of the items are just a little off spec...

     

    The good news is your tires, if they are evenly worn between outer, middle, inner, indicates balance and alignment are ok.
  • gee35coupegee35coupe Posts: 3,475
    I would suggest Discount Tire or Kauffman Tire.
  • Thanks! One last question.... when you get a flat, and it is repaired should you have your tire "rebalanced"?
  • ruking1ruking1 Posts: 19,825
    I have seen it done both ways. They marked the tire and did the repair. The remounted using the marks. Then they did the machine run (Hunter 9700) balance to see if it did need rebalancing, in the 3/3 cases that I have seen they did not. This was verified by the balance machine. But if it is part of your road hazard warranty at no charge- why not!? Even if they have to charge-why not? If you use it and it is unbalanced you will certainly experience a less than good ride and will probably experience a portion of unneccessary wear befor you correct it.
  • blueiedgodblueiedgod Posts: 2,798
    Getting Closer:) Thanks guys. Where do you guys (and gals) get your tires? I want to do this right.

     

    Since you are in Cali, and I assume in southern Cali, you almost never see snow, Yokohama may be the best bang for the buck. I had the Avid T4' son my CR-V and they were the best dry/wet tire, but the worst snow tire. They were quieter than OEM, but because of the softer compound I had to jack up the tire pressure to 36 to stop the tire from squirming in corners.

     

    Right now I have Bridgestone Potenza RE 950 on the Civic and they are good wet/dry tire, and a little bit better in the snow than Yokos were. But not as good in the snow as the OEM Michellins.

     

    As far as where to buy, Costco is good Brick and mortar place, in fact there is coupon in "the passport" for $60 off Michellins or Bridgestones. I got mine last summer when Costco had $80 off, but I bought the tires at ETD as they were able to beat the Costco price. Tirerack is an excellent place to get tires, and probably one of the few retailers that carry Yokohama tire.

     

    In general, most tire shops will match Tirerack's price+shipping+installation. Costco used to install tires not bought there for $10/tire, but since they went to Nitrogen fill I don't think they install tires not bought there any longer.

     

    BTW the OEM tire should have lasted you at least 45K miles.
  • OEM? Not sure what that is but the original tires (so far:) have lasted me 48K:) Thanks about the tire info, I'm interalizing and processing. I went to Walmart yesterday for some pricing, but decided against it... they do NOT do alignments! How can you trust a ''tire place'' that doesn't do alignments? To me they are hand in hand.

     

    Lastly, if you need to balance a tire the first time it's put on, why would it not be done all the other times?? (Note: I have had a TON of flats) (3 in just 3 weeks for starters!!) and they never re balanced the tires, ever.
  • ruking1ruking1 Posts: 19,825
    I did the Costco offer, but it was on an suv and so a bit off topic. They also do not offer alignments. While alignment can go hand and hand with tire mount/demount, balancing and flat repair, the fact of the matter is they usually are an ala carte item.
  • I have a 2000 Honda Civic LX sedan with a Honda security system. When the weather is cold and the car is locked and alarm activated if I unlock the door and get into the car and close it again, the doors will lock and alarm will activate in a minute or so if I do not put the key into the ignition. Is this normal? My dealer says so , but I never noticed it before.
  • My guess is your dealer is right. Most active alarm systems have that kind of security feature in case you accidently hit the unlock button to the car while walking away from it or something after you think you locked it. It's just a little extra thing in there to help make sure your car is waiting for you when you come back :). My regular passive anti theft system on my 03 Coupe will automatically relock the doors if the door unlock button has been hit and there is no activity on the doors for more than 30 seconds..
  • Ncampbell2002..thanks for your reply. But my doors will relock and alarm will be activated even after I open the door and shut it again. Does this happen to your car?
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