Howdy, Stranger!

It looks like you're new here. If you want to get involved, click one of these buttons!





Postwar Studebakers

1114115116117119

Comments

  • berriberri Posts: 7,959
    I know those Studebaker Cruiser's were based off of the Lark, which was a compact. But for some reason I always had though they had stretched the Lark a bit for the latter model Studebaker's?
  • uplanderguyuplanderguy Kent, OHPosts: 9,846
    The '61 Lark Cruiser added four inches to the wheelbase to make it 113". From '62-66 all four-door Studebakers were on a 113" wheelbase. Two-door Studebakers (except the Hawk) were on a 109" wheelbase from '62-66.
  • berriberri Posts: 7,959
    You know, I'm always learning stuff here. I thought the latter Studebaker's were stretched a bit, but I never realized it happened with the 61 Lark so soon after intro. IIRC it was introduced in 59 along with the Rambler American as the beginning of the popular compact class (small cars weren't all that popular in North America before). I think the more angular lines of the latter Studebaker made it appear larger, as well as I recall it being a somewhat tall car.
  • uplanderguyuplanderguy Kent, OHPosts: 9,846
    Due to necessity, but sort of ahead-of-its-time, the Larks had the same full-size Stude interior of earlier Studes (though narrower than the wide Big Three full-size cars), but were trimmer outside. One thing I like about Studes, although it probably wasn't a sales plus in the fifties anyway, was that I'm hard-pressed to think of a Studebaker that looks fat.:)
  • berriberri Posts: 7,959
    I believe the Rambler American roots go back even further than the Lark, to the early 50's Rambler (as well as Lois Lane and Superman :p ) Many cars back in the old days had frames for a long time despite the frequent body styling changes.
  • uplanderguyuplanderguy Kent, OHPosts: 9,846
    Oh yes. The American as sold through the 1960 model year was the car that came out in 1950. It was really the 1955 model, with front wheel openings, reintroduced for 1958 after being discontinued for three model years.
  • uplanderguyuplanderguy Kent, OHPosts: 9,846
    Sold for $42K today on Bring a Trailer:

    https://bringatrailer.com/listing/1963-studebaker-lark-daytona-r/

    Desirable among the Stude faithful, but at that price I'd expect it to be drop-dead authentic; e.g., "LARK" lettering on front fenders, bumper winguards (wraparound pieces), solid red vinyl interior.... These are all small-dollar things. The winguards should be available cheaply NOS (they were for my '63 in 1993) and the letters were available cheaply as reproductions.
  • berriberri Posts: 7,959
    That Studebaker coupe greenhouse reminds me of the coupe look on Mercedes back in that era. Personally though, while I like that coupe, I actually think the 4 dr carried the Studebaker lines better. Maybe because of the squared off, formal styling lines on them.
  • berriberri Posts: 7,959
    I was looking at the February Hemming's Classic car magazine. There is an article about a guy who restored a 56 Studebaker wagon. Seems his father owned one when he was a kid and then as the tin worm was striking let his teenage son beat around in it after the dad bought a replacement 61 Pontiac (see Uplander, not just the Studebaker that reminded me of you ;) ). I always liked station wagons and the Studebaker had a bit of an unique look, as did IH trucks.
  • uplanderguyuplanderguy Kent, OHPosts: 9,846
    I very-much-like the '63 Lark four-door roofline. In fact, in coupes I like the '64 body better, but in four-doors I like the '63 better. And I own a '66 and I'll still say that. :)
  • uplanderguyuplanderguy Kent, OHPosts: 9,846
    edited January 1
    Last Studebaker Avanti ad I remember seeing. I just like the ad. I remember cutting this out of an old magazine (I think NatGeo) at the Thiel College library for my dorm room after the holidays, LOL.

    https://i.pinimg.com/originals/6a/57/73/6a5773114658633f3578a9b7b1ad9b61.jpg
  • fintailfintail Posts: 42,906
    I know I have told the story, but that reminds me of something I did when I was young. My parents were hobbyist antique dealers, and I quickly learned that if I tagged along with them, they'd get me things, and I might be able to flip things for a profit. I'd buy large quantities of National Geographics from yard and estate sales (they had to be cheap, no more than ~25 cents each, preferably much cheaper - a huge box for $5 was the best way), I'd cut out the car ads with an x-acto knife, and put them in bundles of 10 ads for $9-10 in my parents antique mall both. I sold every bundle I could make.

    I saw this clean local show/driver quality bullet nose coupe at the local specialty dealer yesterday - nice looking car, but no prices on the site or on the cars, which turns me off like nothing else.
  • uplanderguyuplanderguy Kent, OHPosts: 9,846
    You probably remember, as I do, that the car ads in NatGeo tended to be more-expensive models as I guess manufacturers figured that would be more the taste or type of auto buyers, that read NatGeo.

    That's a nice bullet-nose. I think that era Stude, plus Golden Hawks, are the ones the masses identify the most as Studebakers. My wife likes them. I think they're 'out there' styling-wise, although they were the best-selling Studebakers ever built. They made more profit in '59 on fewer units though.

    I went to college at Clarion although I remember cutting that Avanti ad out the Thiel College library which was in my hometown. Really, shame on me for that!
  • uplanderguyuplanderguy Kent, OHPosts: 9,846
    edited January 1
    The Avanti introduced this little slide-out beauty-case thing (Stude called it a 'vanity') that was tucked away in the glovebox. Had a flip-up makeup mirror and little compartments. Really, it took up a lot of glovebox space but it was standard in the '64 cars, even other than Avanti. My '66 Cruiser doesn't have it as it was optional then, but I wish it had it. The Avanti had red instrument lights which they put in the regular '64 cars. I honestly don't know if they were still doing that in '66 or not. I haven't driven my '66 with the lights on yet, LOL.
  • fintailfintail Posts: 42,906
    The same seller has a couple other Studes, including a supercharged GT Hawk - lots of pics, no prices.

    When I was in high school, my school had a huge collection of Geographics going back to at least 1920, if not before. I had to control myself to not "borrow" them (as they were in a disused room, and nobody would have noticed) and pilfer the ads. I recall Olds and Buick ads were big, along with fancier trim Ford and Chevy, Chrysler, Packard, etc.
  • uplanderguyuplanderguy Kent, OHPosts: 9,846
    edited January 1
    Thanks for sending. I love GT's, and I can't resist pointing out non-authentic stuff though, which irritates some folks, LOL. But a selling dealer will never point the stuff out, especially if it isn't obvious. I sort-of like that '63 Green Mist color, not often seen but accurate.

    I believe that that car was not built with the supercharger. With a serial number, the build sheet is easily available from the Studebaker National Museum to confirm. In fact, it has a hood from an earlier Golden Hawk, which has that extra, long piece on top that covers a hole in the hood for that '57-era supercharger to fit!!! (The later supercharged Hawks had a different hood). The tach is obviously aftermarket (supercharged cars from the factory had the tach standard) and the "Supercharged" emblem(s) like this car has were used on only the '63 Avanti.

    Minor: Wheels not off-white. Missing grille badge.

    Upholstery looks original or NOS.

    They retooled that decklid for the '64 model year, so it didn't have the ridges nor the metal overlay which covered them. I like that simple look best but for sure they didn't amortize that cost of tooling over only 1,767 '64 Hawks!

    http://www.significantcars.com/cars/1964studebaker/007.jpg
  • fintailfintail Posts: 42,906
    I was hoping you'd pick it apart a bit ;) The seller is notoriously overpriced, their business model either hunting for careless new money (which is quite common here), or having significant negotiation room built into their pricing model.
  • uplanderguyuplanderguy Kent, OHPosts: 9,846
    LOL.....forgot to mention, Avantis had rake but Hawks didn't. :) New springs in the front appear to be in order!
  • fintailfintail Posts: 42,906
    You should send them a note, as their ad copy reads "museum quality". Of course, "museum quality" isn't always a positive connotation, as we've all probably seen some messy cars in museums.
  • uplanderguyuplanderguy Kent, OHPosts: 9,846
    Oh, they'd probably hate that. :) I do think if someone, a newbie for instance, thinks they're buying original/authentic, they need to know what isn't. Of course, I'm assuming the dealer knows, LOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOL!
  • uplanderguyuplanderguy Kent, OHPosts: 9,846
    edited January 2
    Attempted to post a link to a Stude/MB dealer called "Arcure Motors" in Ann Arbor, MI. There is a 1964 photo with of all things, a '63 Ford directly out front, and there's also a pic from around '60 I'd say with a few M-B's in the pic. When one reads old-car articles about which Stude dealers got M-B, one often reads they were the 'biggest' and/or 'the best'. Arcure is even smaller than the dealer in my hometown.

    My bet (only that) is that if you were a Stude dealer who would cough up the money for signage and tools, you got the M-B franchise. My hometown dealer sold them from '57-65.

    I read in a recent book on Byers Burlingame, the last president of Studebaker and a numbers-cruncher, not a product guy, that after the closure of South Bend, he wished to release M-B Sales, Inc., from the Studebaker umbrella and while in Germany tried to see M-B management who supposedly wouldn't see him. Hard to believe, but the book was written from info in the archives at the Stude Museum. Management wanted out of the car sales business by that time, in general. Stude's U.S. dealer network went from 1,915 to 450 between Dec. '63 and Mar. '66.

    I've read 1965 as the end date of that agreement. By that time, my hometown dealer was selling Simca and Sunbeam too. I can remember one Simca in town!

    After the Hawk, Avanti, trucks, hardtops, and convertibles, and Studebaker-built engines, were out of the line--in the '65 model year--only the true diehards were buying Studebakers. The guy who bought my '66 was born in 1904, bought my car a month after the last car was built, and traded in a '53 Stude.
  • fintailfintail Posts: 42,906
    Those tools would have been a not-insignificant investment, I wouldn't be surprised if that did it. I am surprised that a small town middle America dealer carried MB, but then again, if you had a college nearby, and maybe some engineering-intensive local industry, that might have been enough to create demand, as the brand was more popular among professor and engineer types, and wasn't really about status and flash. I think MBUSA was independent from Stude around 1965, too.

  • uplanderguyuplanderguy Kent, OHPosts: 9,846
    My hometown dealer (really, the son of the original dealer) told me they did a pretty good M-B repair business, as a larger city about 15 miles away did not have a M-B dealer. He said their one mechanic in particular became known in the parts as a good M-B mechanic. He is still with us, and a nice fellow.

    My high school nurse, named Isabelle Smith, an older lady who was a real character, drove a slate blue 190SL in the '70's. My dealer friend said they did sell and service that particular car.
  • fintailfintail Posts: 42,906
    I wonder how well the 190SL aged in that climate, summer car only?
  • uplanderguyuplanderguy Kent, OHPosts: 9,846
    Looked nice in the mid-seventies. :)
  • uplanderguyuplanderguy Kent, OHPosts: 9,846
    Wonder if this will bring near the estimate. I'm not crazy about them; I'd take a Gran Turismo correctly restored over it, any day of the week--function of my age. That said, for all the grief they get, I'll take the styling and proportions over, say, the same year Buick or Olds. I think that all other things being equal, these bring the most bucks of any Hawk:

    https://www.mecum.com/lots/FL0118-313025/1958-packard-hawk-sport-hardtop/
  • uplanderguyuplanderguy Kent, OHPosts: 9,846
    If I was looking for a red Hawk, I'd take this one. :)

    I've seen it in person. A first-class restoration.

    https://www.hemmings.com/magazine/hcc/2014/11/Reborn-Hawk---1964-Studebaker-Gran-Turismo-Hawk/3743431.html#PhotoSwipe1515003957772
  • isellhondasisellhondas Issaquah WashingtonPosts: 19,809
    fintail said:

    I was hoping you'd pick it apart a bit ;) The seller is notoriously overpriced, their business model either hunting for careless new money (which is quite common here), or having significant negotiation room built into their pricing model.

    This seller is in our backyard and I have to agree about overpriced. When they don't list a price and say CALL you can be assured the car is overpriced.

    Still, they have been ib business for quite awhile now so not everyone must share out opinion!
  • fintailfintail Posts: 42,906
    edited January 4
    I think they've been around for 20 years, maybe more. This area has been affluent for some time, so it works. I think they build room for negotiation into their prices, as much of their inventory is kind of ordinary, and people shop around.

    But otherwise, they are in the right place at the right time. Three key demographics here - well-paid tech dorks, sketchy offshore money launderer types, and shall I say, fortunate boomers - all three will be attracted to various types of the inventory.



    This seller is in our backyard and I have to agree about overpriced. When they don't list a price and say CALL you can be assured the car is overpriced.

    Still, they have been ib business for quite awhile now so not everyone must share out opinion!

  • uplanderguyuplanderguy Kent, OHPosts: 9,846
    edited January 14
    The '58 Packard Hawk in my earlier link here just sold at Mecum for $137,500. I think the Mopar-like "toilet seat" on the decklid is the most egregious thing on the car but again, give me a Gran Turismo any day. But that is some serious money for a closed postwar Studebaker.
Sign In or Register to comment.