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Project Cars--You Get to Vote on "Hold 'em or Fold 'em"

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Comments

  • Mr_ShiftrightMr_Shiftright Sonoma, CaliforniaPosts: 57,570
    He'll just have to know when to hold it or fold it---it's the kind of car where it would be easy to throw good money after bad.

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  • andre1969andre1969 Posts: 23,040
    He'll just have to know when to hold it or fold it---it's the kind of car where it would be easy to throw good money after bad.

    I was afraid I'd have to make the hold it or fold it decision this past summer, when my '79 5th Ave started leaking fuel. The first time it did it was on a really hot day, parked on a hill, with an almost full tank, so I initially thought it was just some kind of pressure build up.

    But then, it did it one day when parked in my driveway...still a slope, and again an almost full tank, but a much cooler day. And when I took off the gas cap to relieve the pressure, it kept leaking.

    I had this horrible mental image of the tank and the filler neck being shot, and the mechanic finding all sorts or rust back there as he tore deeper into it.

    But, thankfully, all it needed was a new gasket, where the filler neck goes into the tank. He also replaced a few hoses that he said were OEM. Adjusted the back brakes, and did an oil change, and for about $300 I was back on the road again.
  • stickguystickguy Posts: 25,305

    2015 Hyundai Sonata 2.4i Limited Tech (mine), 2013 Acura RDX AWD (wife's) and 2015 Jetta Sport (daughter's)

  • andre1969andre1969 Posts: 23,040
    I like it, but seems a bit rough for $3500. Plus, it's a base model. Almost seems weird, seeing a luxury car with a vinyl interior! But, considering that even today, you can get a Benz with "MB-tex", and a BMW with whatever they call their version, maybe I shouldn't be so harsh on it.

    There's something about the vinyl Buick used in that era that I didn't like though. It had a sturdy, durable look to it (despite that rip in the seat), but just something about the texture, made me think of that stuff they used to cover the seats in school buses and police cars.

    Still, I like it. You don't see the 2-door hardtops very often anymore, it seems.
  • tjc78tjc78 JerseyPosts: 6,409
    I guess I don't know the market well, because if it drives out nice I thought 3500 was a decent price.

    2017 Buick Enclave / 2017 Hyundai Elantra

  • Mr_ShiftrightMr_Shiftright Sonoma, CaliforniaPosts: 57,570
    needs paint, so that ain't cheap.

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  • fintailfintail Posts: 41,887
    Probably takes more paint than the average house :shades:
  • andre1969andre1969 Posts: 23,040
    I might be a bit out of touch as well, but to me, a car like that is all about hedonism. So that means the most luxurious, pimpy versions will command the premium price. So, if it was a Limited model, or the Park Avenue, which I think came out in 1975 or 1976, I think it would fetch a bit more.

    But, in the condition it's in, I think I'd be willing to pay $1500-2000 for it.

    Personally, I put a bit more premium on it because it's still a true 2-door hardtop, at least. Once upon a time, the hardtop was the "premium" model, but once you got into the 70's, in luxury cars at least, often the hardtop was the base model, and the "premium" model had a landau roof.

    And, in the case of the Chrysler New Yorker at least, the cut corners so badly that if you got the optional landau roof, they actually left the roll-down mechanism and window motor in place, but simply removed the switches for it, as they added on all that padded crap.

    The last year you could get a true hardtop coupe in the GM C-body was 1974, and that year they started offering the landau roof as an option. For 175-75, the landau roof was the only choice, if you wanted a coupe.
  • Mr_ShiftrightMr_Shiftright Sonoma, CaliforniaPosts: 57,570
    I agree--I'd appraise it at about $1800 tops.

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  • omarmanomarman Posts: 849
    A good re-paint for an old car probably is about the same cost to paint an average sized ranch home. I like old Detroit iron but the labor costs for shiny paint and trim make the choices clearer. I'd pass on a "collectible" car that would have to wear its patina right down to rust just because the math doesn't work to save it.
  • fintailfintail Posts: 41,887
    I think a decent quality paint job is still going to run a minimum of 4K or so - one big reason my old car isn't going to get one unless I come into a gigantic pile of money. For a lot of old cars, that's a huge portion of the value of the car, if not all of it.
  • andre1969andre1969 Posts: 23,040
    Oops...I just saw the typo in my previous message...meant to say "from 1975-76", don't know why it came out "175-75". But, I guess y'all figured out what I meant. :blush:

    Anyway, I wonder why the seller didn't bother to at least vacuum the car out? I think something minor like that would go a long way toward making it more presentable...even with the rip in the seat!
  • andre1969andre1969 Posts: 23,040
    Yeah, that's one reason why a paint job isn't in the near future for any of my old cars anytime soon. My '76 LeMans has mis-matched paint, and it's not the original color, but it doesn't look that bad, for a car that cost me $3,000. I'd guess the nicest 1976 LeMans in the world might be worth $10,000 at best. And, spending $4,000 on a paint job is NOT going to make mine the nicest one in the world! All it would do is make me suddenly worry about every little nick and scratch.

    My '67 Catalina convertible has what the seller described as "a $500 paint job", but that was back in 1994, so adjusting for inflation, I guess that would come out to around $800 today. Still, a cheapo job. But, its pale, creamy yellow color is very forgiving, so it's not too bad looking.

    As for my two R-bodies, well, the 5th Ave cost me $900, while the base NY'er was all of $500. Other than nicks and scratches here and there, and a spot or two where it was touched up, it's not bad looking. Still nice and shiny. And the $500 one still shines up fairly well, except for the trunk and one door, that look like they were repainted at some point. And again, it doesn't make financial sense to put a ton of money into a nice paint job.

    Unless, like you said, a huge pile of money suddenly came into the picture!
  • omarmanomarman Posts: 849
    Never thought of it before but building your garage was a better investment than a full paint/body resto on each car in your collection. It keeps your cars out of the elements, raised the value of your property and maybe even capped the size of your collection due to limited space!

    Back in the 70s, a friend of mine built a new house but kept on driving his 7 y/o Opel Kadett. Looked funny to see that scruffy little car parked in the garage. But after walking through the rest of the house you could tell that he was putting his money in the right place. :shades:
  • andre1969andre1969 Posts: 23,040
    I wonder what it would cost, on average, to rent an indoor storage space for a car? I estimate that I've got about $30,000 sunk into my garage, and at this point I've had use of it for about 80 months. They broke ground on it in late summer of 2005, but the floor wasn't poured and finished and ready to park on until April of 2006.

    So, for a 4-car garage, it amortizes out to about $375 per month at this point, or about $93.75 per month per car. And, for every month that goes by, it gets a little cheaper.
  • fintailfintail Posts: 41,887
    Patina is seen as a positive thing these days, too - maybe a side effect of the new economy where dumping a rotisserie restoration on everything is simply not doable. That makes keeping old cars original not so bad.

    Your Catalina looks pretty good in the photos you have shown. Then again, so does my car, and the paint on it is pretty weak. But, it's an old car, old paint should be expected. And as you say, less to worry about.

    Old car should get tires in the new year, as the old ones date from when Clinton was in office. Brakes maybe too, if they are needed. I have an easier time doing stuff like that than paint. I want to drive it, not take it to a concours - that'd take another 40K thrown into the fire.
  • fintailfintail Posts: 41,887
    That's about the average price around here. I pay $75/month to park the fintail. If my building had an empty space, it would be $100, and some buildings charge $150. But this is a higher income area too.
  • hpmctorquehpmctorque Posts: 4,600
    "...Unless a huge pile of money suddenly came into the picture!"

    Okay, suppose your great uncle - you know, the weirdo loner that your family rarely mentioned, the one who took off for Australia in his youth and made millions in sheep ranching and mining; yeah, that one - died and left you a couple of mill (after taxes, of course). Would you then really spend several thousand to have your old car(s) repainted?
  • fintailfintail Posts: 41,887
    edited December 2012
    If I inherited a healthy seven figures net, I would have the fintail restored. It has enough needs that once they were all rooted out, might as well do it right. I doubt I would have many other cars even with that money, and it would be fun to have something to wow people with at shows. I'd also take it to Europe and drive it around the 'ring :shades:
  • fintailfintail Posts: 41,887
    Viva Auto Sales in Burnaby might be known to make a mistake here and there.

    I wonder how often that thing would break.
  • hpmctorquehpmctorque Posts: 4,600
    I certainly wouldn't plan any cross country trips with that car.
  • hpmctorquehpmctorque Posts: 4,600
    I guess with a bulging wallet you could comfortably let your emotional attachment to your fintail overrule the rational calculus.
  • ab348ab348 Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, CanadaPosts: 6,386
    In the kind of situation you describe, first priorities would be a new residence and helping some other people. But then, I suspect the number of old cars would not be very big - maybe a couple, but if you are going to be driving much, modern cars are so much better.

    2017 Cadillac ATS Performance Premium 3.6, 1968 Oldsmobile Cutlass S Holiday Coupe

  • fintailfintail Posts: 41,887
    I figure, I can sink 40-50K into it and get what I want, then if I needed to sell, could get maybe half that for it - in Germany. There are worse investments.
  • omarmanomarman Posts: 849
    Here's a faster way to turn $40k into $20k. Buy this original-looking 1971 Z28 now and then sell it for market price tomorrow! In the early 70s my mom's kitchen had an oven and refrigerator which matched that green Camaro interior. :)
  • toomanyfumestoomanyfumes S.E. Wisconsin Posts: 1,004
    Pretty cool it's still the original owner. After owning one F-body ('76 Trans-Am with the 455 4-Speed), I'm not eager to own another. Fun car, but really crappy build quality, especially the interior.
    2012 Mustang Premium, 2013 Lincoln MKX Elite, 2007 Mitsubishi Outlander.
  • lemkolemko Philadelphia, PAPosts: 15,294
    edited December 2012
    Geeze, I have my 1989 Cadillac Brougham restored to a level that would make a brand-new Rolls-Royce Phantom look like a 25 year-old Hyundai Excel that spent it's entire lifetime in Philly's worst neighborhood.
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