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Honda Accord (2003-2007) Maintenance and Repair

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Comments

  • stickguystickguy Posts: 34,308
    well, normally the dealer will be quite a bit pricier. Depends on how much you want to pay for convenience.

    also, many tire shops give lifetime free rotation (and sometimes balancing). That can be worth quite a bit over the years, but again, you need to make a special trip to get it done. You can also get the road hazard warranty for a nominal cost, for piece of mind.

    costco and BJs also do tires, and have very good prices.

    As to brands, it depends partly on what your criteria are (aside from price). Do you drive in snow? Lots of rain? are you more interested in traction or a quiet ride?

    I put yokohama Avids on my 2005. They work very well, but are not really highly rated for snow. Kumho also has some good deals.

    On my Tl (same size) I got B.F. goodrich toruing TAs, and they have worked very nicely. very good deal too. From BJs.

    You can go to Tirerack.com and read reviews on different models, and see how they were rated.

    2019 Acura TLX A-spec 4 cyl. (mine), and 2013 Acura RDX AWD (wife's)

  • steve1steve1 Posts: 8
    I've had pretty good luck with National Tire & Battery (NTB) but I'm not sure how they compare to Costco or BJ's in terms of price. I think the dealer would be the most expensive, so I would avoid them.

    As far as tires go, like the other reply said, I would go to tirerack.com and check out the reviews. My 2003 Accord came with Michelin Energy MXV4 tires that were very good in all conditions but they're not cheap (about $130 each when I replaced them at 55,000 miles). There are other tires out there for less than that which will do well for you (I just don't know what to recommend since I've always had good luck with Michelins). Tirerack.com has a lot of really good info, though. Good luck!
  • hondahenryhondahenry Posts: 35
    very good info. appreciate very much your help, steve and stickguy.
  • stickguystickguy Posts: 34,308
    actually I got advantage TSs at BJs. Nice tires. and made in the USA!

    2019 Acura TLX A-spec 4 cyl. (mine), and 2013 Acura RDX AWD (wife's)

  • thegraduatethegraduate Posts: 9,731
    I love the performance of my Bridgestone Potenza G019s, as they're a high-performance all-season. Great in wet & dry alike, sharp-handling, but not particularly quiet; they were $95 a tire at Big Ten Tires for the 16" wheels on my '06 EX Accord. For quiet tires, the relatively inexpensive Firestone FR380 are good, as I recommended a few posts back. I don't remember cost per tire, but they were $407 installed on our '02 Accord LX with 15" wheels.
  • jp2004jp2004 Posts: 1
    I can see the display fine during daylight hours, but the LCD light doesn't usually light when I turn on headlights. I've researched the PCB issue, learned that the 4-cylinder is not covered under the extended warranty from both the dealer and Honda USA. I understand that what's causing the issue with the LX V6, and EX models is a burned out resistor on the PCB (e.g. poor design -- it sounds like the resistor is overheating because of its proximity to AC related components on the same board -- the resistor is in place in order to keep the bulb from burning out).

    A couple days though, a strange thing happened -- the light came on -- suggesting that the resistor isn't burned out and that their might be some other issue. The light has gone out again, but I think the issue may be either a loose wire, or it could be that I inadvertently reset the radio console somehow (this is an used car). What I did differently from the past was that I inserted a CD into the player, then turned on the headlights. I've used the CD player before but never in conjunction with the headlights (I've only had the car for a few weeks at this point). After about 10 minutes I noticed that the display light had turned on. I was able to turn the engine off and the radio display light came back on twice after stops of about 30 minutes. The next morning it appeared that the display was still lighting. However, two days later the radio went dark again, and I haven't been able to trigger the display light again (suggesting that maybe there is a loose wire -- or perhaps some other issue). Has anyone else with a 4-cylinder LX sedan 2004 experienced a similar issue? (e.g. the display light stopped working and then came back on?) Any ideas for fixes?
  • crazygrrrlcrazygrrrl Posts: 85
    I've got a 2007 Accord coupe 4 cyl w/ automatic transmission. I bought the car new and it's reached 39,000 miles (80% smooth freeway driving; cruise control at 65 mph).

    The owner's manual says to change the automatic transmission fluid at 60,000 miles!

    Most of the cars I've had before recommends a transmission fluid change at 30,000 miles.

    Should I change it ASAP or wait for the next 21,000 miles?

    Also, when should I change the power steering fluid? The manual doesn't mention when it should be changed.

    Thanks.
  • jonahdogjonahdog Posts: 28
    If you are planning on keeping the car I would definitely change the tranny fluid now. I currently have an 02auto with 180K, 03auto with 135K and 07 manual with 40K. I try to change the tranny fluid @ 45K or sooner if needed. If you drive in Mts, extreme heat or pull something definitely change it more often. Once that that tranny acts up you may find yourself hating your car and changing the fluid is a lot less $$ than a new transmission. My 2 cents. :shades:
  • crazygrrrlcrazygrrrl Posts: 85
    Wow, 180K! Looks like you're doing the right thing.

    I'll sched an appointment to have the transmission fluid changed next month. I plan to keep my car until the wheels fall off or it gets stolen or totalled, whichever comes first.

    Thanks.
  • thegraduatethegraduate Posts: 9,731
    The maintentance minder just hit 15% on my '06 Accord 2.4L and indicated A13 (Oil Change and Trans Fluid Change) so I plan to have my fluid changed in the next two weeks. Never had it done.

    I'm at 63,100 miles.
  • buyahomebuyahome Posts: 26
    edited August 2010
    I recently had my transmission fluid changed by the dealer. I asked how much fluid they remove and was surprised (well not really surprised) that only a small amount of fluid is replaced. In my mind it is like taking a bath with old bath water and a pan of fresh water to add to the tub.

    My question is this. What is the best way to do a transmission fluid change and get most of the fluid out and replace it with new? I have been the Ji%%y Lube route on other cars...please don't suggest that.
  • elroy5elroy5 Posts: 3,741
    edited August 2010
    The best way to change the transmission fluid is to use the transmission's own pump to pump the fluid out, and pour new fluid in at the same time, until it comes out clean. Of course this will use up a lot of fluid (more than the transmission's capacity), by the time the fluid is perfectly clean. If you pay a shop to do it, it will probably cost $200 or more. It is possible to do this yourself, but I've never tried it. I change out 3 quarts every 15k miles, and change the filter every other change or so, and my fluid stays pretty clean, so I'm not going to try it myself. What you positively don't want to do, is use a "power flush" machine on a Honda automatic.
  • swhitsswhits Posts: 1
    I have an 07 V6 Sedan and I get the exact same shudder. Only on light acceleration and usually through 2nd and 3rd gear. If I am going up a hill, it's even worse, just as you mention. It's not as violent, but all I can compare it to is exactly like having a manual and dropping the clutch out in too low of a gear once you're already at speed, kind of a bucking and jerk for a few seconds until things settle down. I'm still under warranty and have been scared by all the 03-05 V6 transmission issues, so I took it in. They "had trouble recreating" the problem (which is a joke, because it does it every time under the right conditions), but ended up saying my rear engine mount was collapsed and replaced that. I should have turned around on my way home from the dealer, because it is no better. I was wondering about the torque converter - does anyone have any advice? I'll make another appointment and take it back in, but I am looking for anything specific I can tell them to look for or check, so hopefully it will get fixed right, and I won't have to make a 3rd appointment. Any help is appreciated.....
  • jonahdogjonahdog Posts: 28
    I have an 03 accord 4cyl auto with the same shudder as well. I notice it most in morning when I am slowly accelerating uphill on interstate from @ 50-65 mph in 4th gear with overdrive engaged (ie. low RPM @ 2000). Strangely, after I crest the hill I don't notice the shudder so much on the rest of the drive. Car has @ 130k. I have read about the motor / transmission mounts going bad on the @03 models but have not had mine looked at. The tranny itself works very well, smooth and appropriate shifts, has never hesitated or acted strange in any way. I remember a few posts that mentioned a complete change (all the motor mounts). Seems like this was an issue when the 03 model change occurred. Anxious to hear other suggestions as well.
  • grampy1grampy1 Posts: 140
    This is driving me crazy!! Manual says 60 k under extreme driving conditions of heat,cold, dusty,etc. No mention of time elapsed.

    Two dealers say 105,000 ,or 7 years.

    What is others experience?
  • elroy5elroy5 Posts: 3,741
    edited August 2010
    It's 105k miles, or 7 years. The conditions that would require you to change it earlier are VERY extreme ( if the car is driven in minus 20 degrees, or plus 120 degrees regularly). Unless you live in the middle of the desert, or the North pole, I don't think your car will regularly see these extreme temperatures. I don't think dusty conditions have anything to do with the timing belt (it is under covers). My 03 V6 is at 80k miles, but getting close to the 7 year mark. I plan to take the front timing cover off, and inspect the belt at the 7 year date, and determine when I will actually change it. If the belt doesn't show any significant wear, I will wait a while longer. I have never heard of a belt breaking on these engines before the 105k, or 7 year interval. One guy, who did a how-to on the timing belt job said he thought his belt could have gone to 120k miles easy. Changing it at the 105k/7 year interval is the safe way, but chances are it would last much longer, under normal conditions.
  • chucko3chucko3 Posts: 793
    Dealers are right.
  • ezshift5ezshift5 West coastPosts: 858
    Owner's manual: 105k. Dealer folk tend to agree. Bring money. Local Honda folks vary from a high of $1600 to a low (so far) of $850.........

    A lot less of my Naval Reserve dinero that a new Acura TSX with the same 6M but a lot less power and about the same fuel efficiency (freeway).

    No real complaints, ez....
  • thegraduatethegraduate Posts: 9,731
    I had mine done by my local reputable mechanic. He charged $400 + $78 for the water pump. The dealer wanted $850.
  • stickguystickguy Posts: 34,308
    elroy, since so much of the job is the labor, why not just put the new belt in when you have it all opened up and be done with it?

    for the person with the shudder that (no surprise) the dealer "could not reproduce", the best thing is for you to take the service manager/writer out and recreate it yourself, since you know when it will happen. Most likely they just had a tech make a quick lap around the parking lot, so of course it isn't going to do anything!

    2019 Acura TLX A-spec 4 cyl. (mine), and 2013 Acura RDX AWD (wife's)

  • grampy1grampy1 Posts: 140
    Thanks to everyone who replied. My local mechanic is around $500 also.
  • elroy5elroy5 Posts: 3,741
    elroy, since so much of the job is the labor, why not just put the new belt in when you have it all opened up and be done with it?


    Taking the front cover off, to inspect the timing belt, should take less than 1/2 an hour, and cost nothing. Taking both covers (front and rear) and the bottom cover (which requires removing the crankshaft pulley (which sounds like a job all by itself), and changing the timing belt, will probably take me a full day, if not longer. If I decide to change the water pump, tensioner, and timing belt pulleys it will also cost about $300 for the oem parts. There is a BIG difference, between checking the timing belt, and changing it.
  • elroy5elroy5 Posts: 3,741
    edited August 2010
    I had mine done by my local reputable mechanic. He charged $400 + $78 for the water pump. The dealer wanted $850.

    Changing the timing belt on the V6 is a lot more difficult than changing the timing belt on your 96 I4 engine. There is a lot less room to work, which makes the job that much harder. I think I could change the timing chain on my 4 cylinder truck in half the time (I've done it twice already). I doubt that mechanic would change the V6 timing belt for the same $400, unless he is your best friend. ;)
  • thegraduatethegraduate Posts: 9,731
    Gotcha. You know I have a limited scope of knowledge, so thanks for chiming in to help out our poster. :)
  • hondalovahondalova Posts: 189
    edited August 2010
    In reading this thread, I'm surprised nobody mentioned the issue of close tolerance valves. I don't know for certain that the V-6 3.0L Accord has them, but if it does, I would not take ANY chances on running my timing belt past manufacturer's recommendations b/c, if you guess wrong, and the belt fails, you will destroy the top half of your motor - and any math that favors saving $500 at the daily increasing risk of spending $3000 is math that don't work.

    Oh, and my local mechanic charged me $645 to the belt and water pump at 106k - car now has 145k and still running OK (though it has developed some, um, er, uh, "personality" as the mileage has climbed).

    -FS
  • hondalovahondalova Posts: 189
    I was wondering if any of you out there with the new V-6 Accord Coupe and the manual transmission can tell me what kind of mileage you're getting. I'm about 6-8 months away from going shopping and I hear the current generation gets worse mileage than my 2004 V-6 6 spd. I'm averaging 26-27 mpg on a 70% hwy. / 30% local driving cycle with a 100 mile roundtrip commute every day.

    Oh - and its NY metro traffic, so the cylinder de-activation thingy ain't gonna work so good on my commute.

    -FS
  • elroy5elroy5 Posts: 3,741
    I would not take ANY chances on running my timing belt past manufacturer's recommendations b/c, if you guess wrong, and the belt fails, you will destroy the top half of your motor -

    The owner's manual says 105k miles, or 7 years, whichever comes first. My car will be 7 years old in September, but I only have 80k miles. I plan to change the belt myself, and I don't want to remove all the covers, etc. to find a belt that has very little wear. I will remove the front cover (easiest to remove), and check the condition of the belt. If it looks as good, or better, than my drive belt, which is also the original, I will probably go another 10k miles (really depends on what the belt looks like at that time), Honda's 7 year time limit is IMO a very low estimate on how long the belt will last. I don't run my engine hard at all 90% of the time, and I don't live in an area where extreme temperatures are common. I've not heard of any 3.0 V6 timing belts failing early. I have read quite a few posts from owners who've taken everything apart, to find a belt that is barely worn at all.

    I would NEVER advise anyone else to go beyond the 7 years, but I am willing to bet my belt will not break before I change it. I don't think it's a gamble really, as long as I check the condition of the belt, and not just assume it's in great shape. To each his own.
  • FYI The newest accord V-6 6MT doesn't include the cylinder deactivation - only the V6 automatics get that feature. The new engine is 0.5 liters larger than the previous V6 and the car is bigger and heavier than the previous generation... so it would make sense that the mileage might be less than the previous generation V6...

    Good luck!
  • I have a 2004 Accord EX 4-door automatic (75k miles); I went to my usual Honda dealer for my 5000 mile service and the service adviser said that my front shocks were leaking fluid and need to be replaced at a cost of $695! I did some research such as looking up repair estimate in my area via the web site repairpal.com, and the price range is $321 to $497 in my area (east of Los Angeles suburb), so it seems what the dealer wants is way above typical repair prices. I asked the adviser why did the shocks fail so fast, he said it might be due to running over potholes...but I don't remember running over any big potholes since my last dealer maintenance visit about 6 months ago.

    I bought a Honda because i wanted to avoid these high repair costs--especially at such relatively low mileage (75k miles), and I feel disappointed that I face such a high repair bill for what is supposed to be a reliable car; and my Honda has had all the maintenance done at Honda dealerships but I am currently quite upset with the dealer's quote of $695 and I am looking at possibly getting the repair done at an independent shop (there's a repair shop in my area that specializes in Honda/Toyota so I'm going to get a quote from them).

    Has anyone else had problems with their Accords front shocks leaking fluid and needing replacement?
  • Mr_ShiftrightMr_Shiftright Sonoma, CaliforniaPosts: 64,490
    75K-80K is about normal lifespan for shocks---I mean, that's not to say they all leak at the mileage, but on most cars, they are tired at 80K.

    Many people will insist otherwise, but that's usually because they have no basis for comparison. Since shock absorber degradation is so gradual, it's hard to notice the deterioration unless the shock absolutely collapsed--which they rarely do. Once NEW shocks are put on, the difference becomes apparent.

    75K is a lot of bouncing up and down through potholes and who knows what else.
  • jonahdogjonahdog Posts: 28
    Shocks can certainly wear out by 75K. And 75K in some areas (usually the northern states) is a lot more punishing than in others. I've seen shocks go bad (leak fluid) with only 10K (in this instance a Ford). My current stable has 3 accords: 2002 with 175K 2003 with 135K and 2007 with 40k. None has needed shocks/struts replaced. In fact the 2002 drives and looks as nice as any brand new accord.

    Did the dealer show you the leaking fluid? I would get a second opinion. :shades:
  • daveturnerdaveturner Posts: 25
    edited August 2010
    Thanks for the quick reply...the service adviser at the dealership did not show me the leaking fluid, but I am quite mad that they are charging what seems to be $200 above market price for the repair. I used to be "scared" to have my Honda done at an independent repair shop because I thought they might use inferior fluids or parts...but I refuse to be gouged... so I am looking at "higher tier"/better-rated independent repair shops to get the shocks replaced...

    I will definitely get a second and third opinion (I am awaiting for their repair estimates)--if their prices are good, i think i will have my tires changed, alignment, and front brake pads changed too (hopefully save some money for these maintenance services compared to doing it at a dealership).

    Also, not sure if the dealership is desperate for money...but I have always changed my cabin air filter at the 30K mile major service...I had my 60K major service done back in late June 2009, and my most recent visit (75K) the service adviser says my cabin air filter needs to be replaced soon...I have been driving the same streets/freeways for the past 6 years and all of the sudden my cabin air filter gets dirty so fast? Do you think I should just ignore them and just get my cabin air filter replaced during my next major service (90K)? What's the worse that can happen if the cabin air filter gets too dirty?
  • elroy5elroy5 Posts: 3,741
    The struts lasted 75k miles. Well some last 150k miles, some leak before 50k. Chalk it up to bad luck. I do think you could get a much better price, if you shop around. That Honda/Toyota shop sounds like a good one to try.
  • elroy5elroy5 Posts: 3,741
    ...I have been driving the same streets/freeways for the past 6 years and all of the sudden my cabin air filter gets dirty so fast?

    If there is road work in the area, it could easily increase the dirt in the filter. I've always changed my own filter (easy, no tools required $20), and I have never left a filter in that long (30K). My filters are usually too dirty for me by 15k miles, but our situations may not be the same. In the owner's manual, there should be instructions on how to check the filter, if you want to see for yourself.
  • Did you buy the cabin filter from a Honda dealer parts department for $20....or did you buy a generic brand cabin filter from an auto parts chain store?
  • colkidcolkid Posts: 9
    daveturner, We have an ex-Honda repair shop,worked for local dealer for 25 and 12 years. They replaced mine, with Honda shocks at $129.99 each = $260 + labor 175 + tax 18 = TOTAL $452.40.
    Don't put anything on but the honda shocks, a friend of mine had a
    2000 accord v-6 for 320,000. Changed the front shocks with Monroe or some other good brand and the car didn't ride correctly. He immediately put on Honda standard shocks on the front and the ride was correct again.
    Get quotes with them using original honda shocks or buy then and
    take them to them. I am in Northern Colorado.
  • jonahdogjonahdog Posts: 28
    I agree, stay with Honda Brand shocks. If you like the Honda Ride, stay with OEM... I had a 93 and replaced the rear shocks with "Monroe" junk. Hated the ride, way to mushy and no control.

    Starting with the 2003 and later, the cabin air filter is a cinch to check and/or change. If you want to see a demo, check out Youtube. How often you change it is really up to you. Is the pollen / dust severe in your area? I change mine every 6 mos or so.
  • elroy5elroy5 Posts: 3,741
    I do all my own maintenance, so I usually order a year or two supply of items from HandAaccessories.com. There prices are much lower than the dealership, but if you only buy one or two items, the shipping will negate the savings, so I will usually order wiper blade refills, six pack of oil filters, cabin and engine air filters, and any fluids etc. I will need for a while. I was thinking about trying the new cabin filters they sell at Walmart. They have charcoal in the filter to eliminate odors. I don't like the Fram engine air filters, so I will probably keep purchasing them from HandA. If all you want is the cabin filter, I'd say try the new one Walmart has.
  • Thanks guys for all the info regarding shocks and the cabin air filter.

    Based on the messages posted earlier, I will definitely insist on the repair shop using Honda brand shocks.

    I viewed the Youtube video on how how to replace the cabin air filter and it is indeed a simple procedure; I went ahead and ordered a Fram cabin air filter via Amazon.com--I look forward to changing out the cabin air filter this weekend....
  • fbc2009fbc2009 Posts: 7
    I needs some help as usual. My engine light turned on and the message is P0141, which is related to the oxygen sensor, the rear one.
    First question: what is the difference between a primary and the secondary (rear) oxygen sensor?
    Second question: how do I know if my engine is a CA standard one? the car was sold originally in NC, it says it is a LEV but under the hood it says also CARB standard. if I install an oxygen sensor not CA standard on CA standard engine, do I risk something?
    Thanks for your help!!
  • daveturnerdaveturner Posts: 25
    edited August 2010
    I finally got my car to the Honda/Toyota independent repair shop; the technician (who is also the owner of the shop) gave me a quote of $500 (out the door price) to replace the front shocks (using Honda brand shocks), but he wanted to inspect to see if my shocks really needed to be replaced.

    When he put my car up the lift he could tell for sure my rear shocks were dry (no fluid leak) and he mentioned that it looks like the front shocks could be a little wet; then he lowered the lift to the height of his head and using his flashlight he determined it wasn't wet--it was just the undercoating that looked shiny--he scraped a little bit of the area below the shock and it was dry (we looked at this together). So in the end he said my shocks don't need to be replaced, but I should change my tires soon (his shop doesn't sell tires).

    So in summary, either the Honda dealer I usually go to tried to rip me off or they had an incompetent or rookie technician misdiagnose that my front shocks were leaking fluid!

    I think from now on I will use the independent Honda shop to do my maintenance and repairs (they only use Honda factory parts)--the customer waiting area is no where near as good as the Honda dealer...but at least I know I won't get wrong diagnoses and super-inflated repair prices....

    also, I plan to buy new tires for my Accord from tirerack.com, and based on reviews, it looks like the Michelin Primacy MXV4 ("V" speed series) is one of the best choices. I could order the tires from tirerack.com and have it shipped directly to a local installer to mount and balance the tires (prices are published for each local installer and the prices seem reasonable). Has anyone bought tires directly from tirerack.com and had them installed using a local installer?
  • Shocks can wear and fail without leaking. Stock shocks are usually good for ~40-50k before there is noticeable degradation in handling and performance. What really gets affected is nose dive during braking, how composed the car is over poor pavement, and emergency maneuvers. They can be worn out and not be leaking.
    Monroe isn't a particularly stellar brand of replacement shock. Tokico is one of the OEM suppliers and is probably a better OEM/aftermarket choice. I have also had good luck with KYB GR-2s on my last Accord.

    If you like Michelins (and are willing to pay the premium for the brand), you might also check out Costco stores as they have a tire department that carries the brand. You can also usually get Sears to price match Tire Rack. That said, I have had good luck ordering tires (usually r-compound race tires) from tire rack and having them mounted by a local installer. Once I established a relationship, I could have the tires drop-shipped there.
  • Thanks for the heads up about Costco; I checked costco.com and they do indeed carry the Michelin Primacy MXV4, but it is actually priced higher than Tire Rack. I live in CA and Tire Rack doesn't charge any sales tax for me, but it does charge $52 for shipping--but sales tax is 9.75% in my area, so I come out ahead. Unfortunately, I don't have membership to Costco so I would have to buy an annual membership just to buy the tires.

    Actually Tire Rack allows us to order tires and have them shipped directly to many local installers--they even rate the local installers (based on Tire Rack customer ratings). The independent auto shop technician I mentioned in an earlier post advised me that the only problem with ordering from Tire Rack is that if there is anything wrong with my tires, the local installer could blame Tire Rack and vice versa, so he advised me to ask if the local installer can match Tire Rack's prices and buy the tires from the local installer instead--but i doubt that they can match Tire Rack's prices.
  • stickguystickguy Posts: 34,308
    keep in mind that upfront cost is only 1 aspect. Many tire places give you lifetime balance and rotations when you buy from them, and over the years, that can really add up.

    Plus, if you get a road hazard warranty, you don't have to deal with a mail order place, and wait for replacement tires, etc.

    I actually go tires once at NTB (which happens to be a TR drop ship place and official installer), and when I showed them the TR price, they agreed to match it. But, what they ended up doing was ordering the tires themselves, and having me come back in a few days when they arrived. I ended up paying the TR price, but got the NTB rotation/balancing and RHW package.

    2019 Acura TLX A-spec 4 cyl. (mine), and 2013 Acura RDX AWD (wife's)

  • jonahdogjonahdog Posts: 28
    I've purchased several sets of tires from tire rack. At first I just had them sent to the house but it's a lot more convenient when they are shipped directly to the installer. I used the tire rack on line installer review option to choose my installer. Good experience for me.

    Michelins are def $$$. I have your exact tire on my 2007. It is a great tire. I have Kumho KH16s on my 2003. They ride just as nice, but don't handle quite as well (but cost @ 1/2 as much). I do recommend having your new tires force balanced. Tires make a huge impact on how the car drives and you're going to live with them for quite a few miles. Some installers offer to exchange if you don't like the tires within a specified time/miles (might be a reason to consider local retailer). Doesn't hurt to ask.. :)
  • blufz1blufz1 Posts: 2,045
    I get my tires at Discount Tire. Lifetime free rotations,balance,and air.
  • thegraduatethegraduate Posts: 9,731
    Would someone with knowledge on the ILP for this model (I have the 2.4L) please post it? I'd be very grateful! I'm still running low on MPG (can't crack 30 when that used to be the norm) and I"m convinced this is the problem.

    Thanks SO much in advance.
  • alamocityalamocity Posts: 680
    Not sure if this is going to help or not but you might try this to see if it helps, it's from a service bulletin dated Oct 2004.
    1 Make sure all electrical items (A/C,audio unit,defogger,lights, etc) are turned off.
    2 Start the engine,and let it reach its normal operating temperature(cooling fans cycle twice)
    3 Let the engine idle (throttle body fully closed and all electrical items off) for 10 minutes
  • thegraduatethegraduate Posts: 9,731
    Thanks a bunch buddy!

    How long does the battery need to be disconnected before-hand, I wonder?
  • alamocityalamocity Posts: 680
    As I recall at least 5 minutes.
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