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My worst car ever!

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    xwesxxwesx Member Posts: 16,832
    Hahahahhah.... great gagrice.... that might sum it up nicely, but it does little to diagnose! :blush: :sick:
    2018 Subaru Crosstrek, 2014 Audi Q7 TDI, 2013 Subaru Forester, 1969 Chevrolet C20, 1969 Ford Econoline 100, 1976 Ford F250
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    andre1969andre1969 Member Posts: 25,725
    but I've heard that with the Pontiac engines, there was something about the placement/design of the starter motor that made it tend to heat up once you turned off the engine and it started to dissipate heat from the block. The side of the starter closest to the engine would get hot, and that would make it stutter a moment as it tried to turn over.

    I've also heard that the Olds 403 tended to do this. I had an '85 LeSabre with an Olds 307, which is the same basic block, but the 403, having a larger displacement, might have dissipated more heat?
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    gagricegagrice Member Posts: 31,450
    I'm sorry just could not help myself. My brother in law loves those old Chevy and Ford vans. He has several in different stages of being rebuilt. Also the Jeep cabover models.
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    xwesxxwesx Member Posts: 16,832
    Interesting. I was thinking along the same lines, except that it did not always do this - only since, perhaps, 1997. I did a complete mechanical swap on a pair of vans (the mechanical donor was a 1971 E100, the body donor is a 1969 E300) in 1995 and since I mated the E100's 302 with the E300's C4 transmission, it has been problematic. I was leaning toward this problem being a starter issue, but though that perhaps it was some sort of crazy heat-related crankshaft bearing problem or something. It has not become any worse since 1997, but then I have used it progressively less since then as well.

    I need to rebuild the heads on it one of these days years, but if this "difficult to start when hot" problem is an engine issue, I would just rebuild the whole darned thing while I was digging into it. Actually, I might oughta do that anyway. :sick:
    2018 Subaru Crosstrek, 2014 Audi Q7 TDI, 2013 Subaru Forester, 1969 Chevrolet C20, 1969 Ford Econoline 100, 1976 Ford F250
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    xwesxxwesx Member Posts: 16,832
    Hahahha... not a problem. I got a kick out of it. I look forward to all the jibing I will get when I finally rebuild my '74 Pinto wagon, if it ever happens.
    2018 Subaru Crosstrek, 2014 Audi Q7 TDI, 2013 Subaru Forester, 1969 Chevrolet C20, 1969 Ford Econoline 100, 1976 Ford F250
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    andre1969andre1969 Member Posts: 25,725
    Heck, when/if that Pinto ever gets rebuilt, I want to see pictures! For all the ribbing the Pinto takes, I think they're kinda cool in a reverse chic sort of way. I think one of those sportwagon models with the little porthole would be cool to have.

    Hey, here's a dumb question...I know it was never offered that way, but can you feasibly squeeze a Ford smallblock V-8 into a Pinto's engine bay? I figure if a Mustang II could take it, a Pinto should be able to.
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    xwesxxwesx Member Posts: 16,832
    That is a great question, and I have not come close enough to the actual project to find out with certainty. But, visually, it should fit in terms of overall width and length dimensions. I am going to put a 302 in it and convert it back to a manual transmission (I don't think a C4 transmission will fit under that car without some fairly intense firewall rearrangement), so I will let you know. Looking at it, I am fairly sure I am going to have to modify the hood a little or find a very low profile carb. But, since I am also going to put a supercharger on it, I will find the forced induction unit first and then work out the carb from there. If I do have to modify the hood, I plan to have it done in a way that will keep it modest and tasteful. Ultimately, no exterior modifications would be ideal, but I figure if I am going to spend any time on this beast at all, I might as well get the most fun out of it as possible.

    I like those sportwagons too. Regrettably, mine is your standard family wagon and white with faux "woody" sides... probably not a typical candidate for sleeper status. :D
    2018 Subaru Crosstrek, 2014 Audi Q7 TDI, 2013 Subaru Forester, 1969 Chevrolet C20, 1969 Ford Econoline 100, 1976 Ford F250
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    kyfdxkyfdx Moderator Posts: 239,186
    I think it was about a year ago... There was a restored Pinto Cruising wagon for sale, out front of a warehouse... Still in primer, but it looked great..

    Why portholes? Customized vans were big in the '70s and this sort of played off of that craze..

    Tons of old Pintos at the dragstrip had 302s....

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    andre1969andre1969 Member Posts: 25,725
    Regrettably, mine is your standard family wagon and white with faux "woody" sides... probably not a typical candidate for sleeper status.

    Ooh, that sounds like fun...a regular Pinto wagon, woodgrain and everything, but set up to kill! :)

    If the smogged down 360 in my '79 New Yorker, which puts out a whopping 150 hp, ever blows, I thought about putting a crate 360 in there or maybe even a bigblock drivetrain from some old junker. Of course if I did that, I'd have to make sure I put whitewall tires on it, and put the wire hubcaps back on to complete the look. Right now it has copcar wheels and dogdish hubcaps, and the exhaust system fell off right behind the catastrophic converter, so the thing looks and sounds more muscular than it really is. The kids with their modded Civics and fartcans hate it, because it can usually drown them out. :P

    Oh, I also found out that the Mopar R-body might be considered one of the worst RWD cars that Chrysler ever made. I was at an antique car show with my LeMans the other weekend, and in conversation mentioned my other cars. Whenever the NYer would come up the response was often "Oh, the crappy one/weird one/bad one/etc" I know the things aren't exactly lusted after, but I didn't know that they were downright reviled! :surprise:
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    nvbankernvbanker Member Posts: 7,239
    I had a 76 Pinto Wagon. It wasn't good..... :P
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    redmaxxredmaxx Member Posts: 627
    Problems:

    - Brakes pulsated, fixed, pulsated, fixed, pulsated, refused to fix
    - Brake fade: Pads were glazed, replaced and then it came back, refused to fix
    - Poor idle: Refused to fix
    - Sometimes wouldn't start: Refused to look at
    - Transmission harshness: Repaired multiple times, kept coming back
    - Transmission slipping: Couldn't duplicate. Slipped on its way off the lot after that diagnosis
    - Poor fit and finish of the interior
    - Numerous interior rattles
    - Poor interior quality parts
    - Shift knob rusted
    - Brake light seal coming off
    - Tires that went bad within the first 1k miles. Dealer refused to do anything
    - Power steering intermittently half quit working
    - Horrible gas mileage
    - Seat cushioning worn out at 15k miles
    - Radio intermittently quit working

    I know there were others, but those are the items that stand out. I finally forced GM to buy it back as a lemon. Then I made my second mistake:

    2004 Malibu Maxx LT:

    - Brakes pulsate. Dealer actually fixed it and it stayed fixed
    - Brakes felt worn out, but dealer said only 20% pad life was used
    - Engine idled roughly
    - Mileage was poor
    - Transmission began slipping about 10k miles
    - PCM update caused very harsh shifting in and out of drive. GM refused to fix.
    - Engine had trouble starting until said PCM update.
    - Brake pull
    - Car pulled, could never get it aligned right
    - Electric steering was notchy and clunky
    - Radio intermittently didn't sync with the car's systems
    - Sunroof rattles
    - Rear roof window shades repeatedly snapped open on their own. GM actually developed a fix, but the dealer kept trying to apply the fix and failed. Eventually replaced the head liner.
    - Transmission began slipping badly at 25k. Dealer refused to fix it. Their master tranny tech said that unless it loses a gear or slams you into the seat, there is no problem.
    - Dealership changed service manager early this year, which drastically changed the attitude of the service.
    - Various other interior parts that broke or snapped off during use.
    - Rattling headlamp
    - Tailgate rattles
    - Dashboard rattles
    - Remote start intermittently quit working
    - Engine leaking oil between the block and the intake (IIRC). Dealer actually tried to spin that one as normal at first.

    And again there were others, but their attitude toward me and their stance on the transmission and engine problems pushed me over the edge. I traded it on a Pontiac Vibe 6 months ago and have been happy ever since. No mechanical problems and only a couple (literally) interior issues. Plus I got a different dealer whose attitude is *far* better.

    Ah, this post makes me feel better. I was actually considering looking at the next Malibu after seeing the pictures of it. Nope, no way! :P :D
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    xwesxxwesx Member Posts: 16,832
    Red, you know what they say, "The third time's the charm!" In this case though.... that might not be a good thing. :surprise:
    2018 Subaru Crosstrek, 2014 Audi Q7 TDI, 2013 Subaru Forester, 1969 Chevrolet C20, 1969 Ford Econoline 100, 1976 Ford F250
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    xwesxxwesx Member Posts: 16,832
    Why portholes? Customized vans were big in the '70s and this sort of played off of that craze..

    I think, primarily, because the male eye appreciates a well-placed curve and those portholes were about the only thing curved on a 70s era car. :P
    2018 Subaru Crosstrek, 2014 Audi Q7 TDI, 2013 Subaru Forester, 1969 Chevrolet C20, 1969 Ford Econoline 100, 1976 Ford F250
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    xwesxxwesx Member Posts: 16,832
    As far as reliability goes, I cannot remember this car having been too much of a lemon, considering the Pinto's reputation. My mother purchased it sometime around 1989 and drove it for a couple years without incident. In 1992 or 3, she had a problem with the distributor (I think it needed new points), so she purchased an entire replacement distributor and proceeded to yank the old one out of the engine. She could not get the new one to fall into place, so she shut the hood and left it....

    Roll to summer of 1997. She gives it to my brother and I as a summer rig while we are home between college, not that we ever were home much considering I was living in Alaska full time (from NE Oregon) and my brother was Mr. Busy.

    At this point, it was sitting for about 5 years as stated above, being used primarily as a tether point for various dogs and/or goats (one goat liked to stand on the hood, caving it in). I took it home to my father's shop and tore into it a bit to figure out its general needs, etc. During the winter holiday break, I flew home for 3 weeks and had it up & running after about a week once a new distributor was in it and the carb was rebuilt. It ran... okay - typical gutless 4 banger. Not very good mileage - probably 18-20 highway, and it had a serious problem leaking transmission fluid around the pan which I was not able to fix even after replacing the pan gasket and filter.

    Anyway, between my brother and I, we had about 300 miles on it when he was ready to head back to college (about 200 miles away). He wanted to take it with him, but I strongly urged against it citing that the engine did not have enough miles since the work to determine if it was going to hold up for him (my minimum is 500). He insisted. It threw a rod 5 miles from school. My father suggested we take it to scrap yard, but I stubbornly drove over there and towed it home. I put it in the quanset hut and there it has sat since - right next to a lovely spare 302 from my van swap. If I could ever get it to Alaska (or move FROM Alaska), I would start tinkering with it. Oh well though - it is out of the weather and waiting patiently unless my father decides to sell his quanset.
    2018 Subaru Crosstrek, 2014 Audi Q7 TDI, 2013 Subaru Forester, 1969 Chevrolet C20, 1969 Ford Econoline 100, 1976 Ford F250
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    montztermontzter Member Posts: 72
    I was actually considering looking at the next Malibu after seeing the pictures of it. Nope, no way!

    I posted earlier about my 2002 Montana Problems......I was actually looking at the new Chevy Uplander/Pontiac Montana SV6 when they first came out. :confuse: But I soon came to my senses an bought the Honda.

    I have no idea what I was thinking.
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    explorerx4explorerx4 Member Posts: 19,410
    my mom is 76 years old and has a 2003 malibu. i drove it a few months ago and the brakes were vibrating. i told her they needed to be fixed. she took it in and they were fixed at no cost.
    she actually gloats now because she says all her friends who drive lexus complain that it costs at least a hundred dollars every time they visit the service department.
    as far as i am concerned the worst car SHE ever owned was an '84 lebaron. it couldn't go faster than 60 mph up the hills on the mass pike.
    2023 Ford Explorer ST, 91 Mustang GT vert
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    randydriverrandydriver Member Posts: 262
    The worst car I have ever owned was the 80 Chevy Monza. It was a beautiful car. It was a hatchback in silver with the burgandy interior. The engine was a 151 cubic inches or 2.5 liters for the metric minded, anyway it would overheat all the time I had it rebuilt once even had a new engine put in and radiator and thermostat and it would still overheat .....to bad it was a pretty car.
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    nippononlynippononly Member Posts: 12,555
    my folks ever owned was their '75 VW camper bus - almost never ran right, was in the shop half the time, and of course back then we were still in the age of repair parts taking three weeks to come from the motherland for German cars. That was the first year of fuel injection, which meant the thing NEVER ran on more than three cylinders, and the dealer couldn't fix it at first. After they figured out it was a design problem, they knew which parts to replace, which then needed replacement regularly about once a year like clockwork. VW fouled up that early FI so badly, in 1978 they went BACK to carburetion for a couple of years while they came up with a new system that apparently worked better.

    My folks' second worst is one they still have now, although the problems are nowhere near as bad as the VW: a '98 Explorer. Lights come on and go off at will - sometimes they don't go off at all and kill the battery. It is at about 8 years and 80K miles, and the radio display has quit. About three years ago, at about 50K, the brakes failed and caused an accident (no-one hurt, thank goodness). About a year before that, and just out of warranty, they had major electrical problems that were killing the battery daily and leaving them stranded from time to time. First time the dealer couldn't find the problem, second time he rewired just about the whole darn engine bay, total bill was well over $1000, and of course despite the low mileage, Ford didn't help at all. I can't understand the popularity of that model, although I will say it has AMAZINGLY good A/C. Apart from that, it is noisy and rough, and has some of the cheapest seat leather I have ever seen, including some of the stuff the Europeans don't even CALL leather, but rather leatherette.

    Oh yeah, they got to experience the Firestone recall too, and had to wait weeks for an eligible place (eligible for Ford to pay for the replacement tires) to have replacements available.

    2014 Mini Cooper (stick shift of course), 2016 Camry hybrid, 2009 Outback Sport 5-spd (keeping the stick alive)

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    bigfurbigfur Member Posts: 649
    Back in 97 or so i bought an 89 F250 4x4 302 V8 and a 5-speed. Most of the time i owned it it was only running on 7 cyclenders and never got me over 10mpg. No matter what i changed or tried to fix it never ran right. I hope its rotting in some junk yard now...or better yet ended up as a flamming ford somewhere lol.
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    redmaxxredmaxx Member Posts: 627
    She probably got one of the 3 produced with no problems. :P
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    redmaxxredmaxx Member Posts: 627
    I kinda feel bad for whoever bought either car. The dealer put the '04 on the lot as a certified used car. :surprise:
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    andre1969andre1969 Member Posts: 25,725
    The worst car I have ever owned was the 80 Chevy Monza.

    My mother was in the market for a new car around that timeframe, and as a 9 year old kid, I was pushing for her to get the Monza, because I thought it looked so cool! She actually did think about it, because of fuel economy concerns, and she was lucky to get 15-16 mpg out of the '75 LeMans she was driving at the time.

    Other cars she was considering were a Plymouth Volare or Pontiac LeMans. One of my grandmother's cousins had recently gotten a 1979 Volare wagon, a 2-tone black-over-silver with a red interior. It was actually pretty sharp looking, and back in those days it was considered a trim, versatile package! The LeMans was in the running because Mom had a preference for Pontiacs, having had a '66 Catalina convertible and then the '75 LeMans coupe.

    In the end, the winner was a 1980 Malibu coupe. Which probably worked out for the best, because 7 years later I would get it as my first car. Had it been the Monza, Volare, or even LeMans, I might be writing about it today as the worst car I ever owned! Even though the LeMans is basically the same thing as a Malibu, I know my Mom would've just gotten a V-6. And the LeMans used the junky Buick 231, whereas the Malibu used a more durable Chevy 229.
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    lemkolemko Member Posts: 15,261
    That's funny. I had both a 1979 Buick Park Avenue and a 1979 Oldsmobile Ninety-Eight Regency with the 403 V-8. I never had any trouble starting the Buick at all, and any problems related to starting the Olds were not due to the starter. However, I did rebuild the carb, replace the fuel pump and battery when the car had something like 140K+ miles on it.
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    lemkolemko Member Posts: 15,261
    The only bad thing I ever heard about the R-Body is concerning the Dodge St. Regis' used as a police cars one year by the California Highway Patrol.

    Do you know that the New Jersey State Police used 1960 Chryslers?
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    andre1969andre1969 Member Posts: 25,725
    That's funny. I had both a 1979 Buick Park Avenue and a 1979 Oldsmobile Ninety-Eight Regency with the 403 V-8. I never had any trouble starting the Buick at all, and any problems related to starting the Olds were not due to the starter.

    Now that I think about it, I believe this problem with the 403 was mentioned in relation to the Firebird/Trans Am, so it could be possible that there was something about the engine in that particular car?
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    andre1969andre1969 Member Posts: 25,725
    The only bad thing I ever heard about the R-Body is concerning the Dodge St. Regis' used as a police cars one year by the California Highway Patrol.

    Yeah, I heard about that too. The CHP nicknamed it the "St. Slowgis". The problem there was that in 1980, the CHP specified 318-4bbls instead of the usual 360-4bbl, and it just wasn't enough engine to move the car. Plus, most of these cops were probably coming off of big-block 400 and 440 Mopars, so naturally any smallblock would seem tame in comparison.

    FWIW, the 1980 Impala with the 350-4bbl was so slow that the Michigan State Police disqualified it from their bidding! I think any police car that the CHP ended up with in 1980 would have ultimately been the butt of a bunch of jokes. It was just a sign of the times.
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    corvettecorvette Member Posts: 10,298
    Shift knob rusted

    Isn't that part made of plastic?
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    corvettecorvette Member Posts: 10,298
    ...back then we were still in the age of repair parts taking three weeks to come from the motherland for German cars.

    Now, it only takes about a week (usually).
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    nippononlynippononly Member Posts: 12,555
    Seriously?? That would be unacceptable for me. I thought those days were over.

    2014 Mini Cooper (stick shift of course), 2016 Camry hybrid, 2009 Outback Sport 5-spd (keeping the stick alive)

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    gagricegagrice Member Posts: 31,450
    You read posts every day on this forum of people waiting a week or more for parts. That includes Honda and Toyota.
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    andre1969andre1969 Member Posts: 25,725
    This has been probably 6-7 years ago, but when the transmission went out on my uncle's '97 Silverado, under warranty, the dealer had it for close to a month!

    The second time it went out, early this year, the local shop had it done in like three days. And it took them that long because they had a backlog!
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    redmaxxredmaxx Member Posts: 627
    Yes, it was rusted. It was the (don't know the word for it) stem that connected the handle to the car and it was metal. What ever black paint they used on it at the factory was flaking off and the metal was rusted.
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    nippononlynippononly Member Posts: 12,555
    Yeah, but only for back-ordered parts for a recall. Apart from a recall (and maybe including recalls), I doubt there is one poster in 1000 owners here at Edmunds that has waited a full week for parts for a Honda or Toyota. Or Chevy or Ford, I am sure. Or probably even a Kia or Hyundai. The Germans seem to be unique in this regard, then.

    2014 Mini Cooper (stick shift of course), 2016 Camry hybrid, 2009 Outback Sport 5-spd (keeping the stick alive)

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    redmaxxredmaxx Member Posts: 627
    Yeah, but only for back-ordered parts for a recall. Apart from a recall (and maybe including recalls), I doubt there is one poster in 1000 owners here at Edmunds that has waited a full week for parts for a Honda or Toyota. Or Chevy or Ford, I am sure. Or probably even a Kia or Hyundai. The Germans seem to be unique in this regard, then.

    Try three weeks. My parents had a 2003 Silverado and it had a failure of the charcoal canister. Out of commission and in a rental for three weeks.
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    gagricegagrice Member Posts: 31,450
    I mostly follow hybrid and diesel. The Mfg do not seem to keep parts for them on hand. Escape hybrid owner waiting for an ABS for several weeks. Several accounts of Prius NAV screens not available. One for a month. Something for an Insight not available.
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    rickypaulrickypaul Member Posts: 24
    I can't decide between the bug and Delta which was the worst car I've ever own. Its almost not fair to pick the bug because it wasn't really a car. It was more like a lawnmower with an interior. The Delta 88 on the other hand was supposed to be a nice car. It had these straps on the doors. Once I closed the door using it and the whole door panel came off in my hand. The service manager told my I wasn't supposed to use it to close the car door. What the hell was it for then?

    I could move the steering wheel in the beetle about 8" on center to either side with no steering response. The Delta on the other hand would need a 4 wheel alignment once every three months or the car would vibrate and basically "eat" tires.

    But all in all, the Bug, while it was a total piece of crap, never really left me stranded and it was 12 years old when I bought it. The Delta 88 on the other hand was 2 years old when I bought it. It is the only car I've owned that had gone through 3 computers and 4 transmissions in 4 years. After that experience I acquired a vision of snow balls in hell. That's when i'd buy another GM product. Its been 12 years and I've kept that vow.
    :lemon:
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    nvbankernvbanker Member Posts: 7,239
    They did have some problems with the 91 Oldsmobiles - I thought they had fixed them by 92 though......
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    joelraabjoelraab Member Posts: 5
    Purchased this car earlier in the year. Dealer seems to be unable to fix the front end alignment as the car has a tendency to drift to the right. Volvo regional people came out to see it too and had no real answers for me.

    I test drove a 2007 Cross Country and it also seems to pull to the right.

    Is this a problem endemic to this car?

    To me, it's a lemon because it's the worst new car I've ever purchased in that they can't seem to fix it.
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    explorerx4explorerx4 Member Posts: 19,410
    put some more air in the right front tire.
    2023 Ford Explorer ST, 91 Mustang GT vert
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    jlflemmonsjlflemmons Member Posts: 2,242
    I had always wanted one of these, and bought a brand new one off the lot in '82 just as the transition from Datsun to the Nissan name was occuring.

    I kept it 23 months and 18K miles before giving up. In the time I owned it the following failed:
    head gasket
    major brake failure (three times. Determined my truck did not have the axles/brakes the factory claimed it had)
    cat converter collapse
    pinion bearing failure
    carb failure (lost count. finally bought the factory manual and just started fixing it myself)
    Rust. And I lived in central Texas.
    electrical problems in the gauge cluster

    After the third time the brakes locked on a soft application, and wouldn't unlock until the vehicle was moved backward a foot or so, I got rid of this piece of rolling excrement and swore I would never, ever buy another Nissan. If the quality of the truck wasn't bad enough, the local dealer convinced me of the error of my decision. How do you tell a customer with a straight face that there is nothing wrong in the emissions system (NAPZ4) when every time you step on the gas, the engine stumbles, and every time you let off the gas, the little mother would backfire so hard it shook the whole truck? My neighbors were getting really jumpy.
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    montztermontzter Member Posts: 72
    "Purchased this car earlier in the year. Dealer seems to be unable to fix the front end alignment as the car has a tendency to drift to the right. Volvo regional people came out to see it too and had no real answers for me."

    Honda had this problem with some models. The ultimate fix was a sub frame adjustment.

    On the other hand, my 2006 Pilot had a pull to the right problem when new. Although the 4 wheel alignment was within specs, one of the four wheels was at the far end of spec. The dealer adjusted all four wheels to as close to perfect as possible and that cleared it up.

    Google "Honda pull to right" sometime if you would like some more information.
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    fundadfundad Member Posts: 27
    Between 6000 and 7000 miles thansmission failure. At that time the dealer noticed the intake manifold gasket was leaking. Was fixed.
    12,XXX miles the intake manifold gasked failed again. Was fixed.
    13,XXX miles the transmission failed again (lost overdrive feature). Was fixed.
    21,XXX miles transmission failed again and AC not working. Bad compressor. Was fixed
    21,XXX miles torque converter failing. Was fixed
    29,XXX miles interior electrical problems (power seats moving by them self). Was fixed.
    30,XXX miles transmission failure again... Van was bought under lemon law. All this was within 14 months.
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    gsemikegsemike Member Posts: 2,291
    I loved it when I got it, but it was so ridiculously unreliable by 50k that it had to go. I bought imported and never went back.
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    eprice1eprice1 Member Posts: 2
    This post gave me the best laugh I've had in months. My parents had this car (or a version of it), a 1980 model that they bought brand new in 1979. The car was huge and burgundy with soft fluffy velour seats and it was truly the sorriest car ever produced.

    The engine gave so much trouble my dad eventually had a mechanic replace it with a gasoline one. Then it really gulped gas! The transmission had to be replaced too. I have these memories of riding in the backseat of that car with my dad merging onto Interstate 95 and the engine sounding like it would explode because it wouldn't shift out of second gear. He was so sick of it he said just let it blow and floored it. Just when you thought the engine would explode, it would shift.

    Though GM was awful while the car was under warranty, the company eventually did repay my dad for the money he spent on the engine and the transmission. I think the nightly news started having reports on how bad they were treating everyone.

    The side molding along the door wouldn't stay on. My mom and I still laugh about the time Dad tried to buy a new piece from the dealer and they told him it was out of stock. "Bleep Bleep, you should keep a tractor-trailer load of that stuff in the back as bad as it falls off. You can sell a fortune." The molding had been glued on so much it was crooked.

    They had the problem with the trunk lid. My mom just propped it up with a tobacco stick. We were a little worried that the stick would slip and the lid would clock her on the head when she was unloading groceries. It was HEAVY!

    Then there was the time I had strep and spent half a day half dead at the doctor's office, unable to swallow. We started home and it began raining so, of course, she turned on her windshield wipers. These had one speed, manic, which wasn't too bad except when it stopped raining and we couldn't shut off the wipers. We looked so ridiculous driving around like that we couldn't stop laughing and it HURT.

    Then there was the time when the heat, on its highest setting, wouldn't shut off. North Carolina can be pretty warm, even in winter, so we tried to roll down the windows. You had to bring the front windows down very, very carefully. If you let them down too far, they slipped out of the track and fell into the door. You couldn't get them back up very easily. This was a problem when it rained.

    The funniest part of this to me is that they had that car from 1979 until I finished college and moved to Germany in 1993--14 years!!!. My mom starting driving my car, a 1986 Mustang.

    Dad had an almost-as-awful 1983 Chevy pickup, also a diesel, which they couldn't keep a fuel pump on. I think he ran through three. My brother wanted to borrow it to move in at college. Dad told him to keep it idling the entire time they unloaded because you never knew whether it would start up again.

    My parents drove their junk for over a decade because they bought shiny new cars for me and my brother. The devotion of a parent is really unlimited.
    But they were able to sell the Oldsmobile for money in 1993! I can't remember how much.

    Lest you think they are cursed, they have had great luck with Fords ever since. I even still have my 1986 Mustang and it needs a bit of care but its still running, 20 years later. We aren't complacent though. I am fluent in my state's lemon law and actually a little crazy about documentation with car dealers and maintenance on the cars I have now.
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    bethanybreezebethanybreeze Member Posts: 20
    Hi joelraab. You're the first VOR owner I've come across on a posting anywhere. I take it you have the XC70. I too have an Ocean Race, but mine's an XC90. Volvo regional came and couldn't find your problem either, eh? Weird... there were only 800 VOR xc90's made, and what, 600 (?) XC70's. Sounds like you have a lemon on your hands. My first VOR XC90 had enough non-start issues within a 2-month period to qualify here in MD as a lemon. Volvo dealership agreed to replace it with another VOR Xc90 (luckily they had one in). It made it nearly 7,000 miles with no problem... but Sunday it too had a dead battery after sitting several hours in my garage. VERY deja vu. Volvo dealership tells me i must have left a light on..... I find this VERY shady and unclassy of them and am surprised this is the same Volvo company i thought so highly of! I think I may know what defect has been slowly draining my battery in both vehicles. Hope they will listen to me, as if not, I will likely wind up with TWO LEMON VOLVO OCEAN RACE XC90s! (check back later on NTHSA reports - my first one is in there)

    Is there a VOR owners forum anywhere? Now I'd REALLY be curious what others are saying about them! We sure spent a LOT of money to have our vehicles in the shop so often, without problems being detected or remedied!

    Pretty discouraging, isn't it??
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    murphydogmurphydog Member Posts: 735
    Clearly my worst car ever. Purchased it with ~ 20,000 miles from a used car dealer (mistake number 1), it was 4 years old with "low miles". In hindsight I really think somebody rolled back the miles. Anyway here is the list

    1. Leaving girlfriends house turn the key and "BOOM" battery blow up. Open the hood and the top of the battery is GONE. Bad voltage regulator

    2. Leaving GF's house and BAM the seat falls all the way back - a small bolt had sheared off in the seat. Get home in the dark and pouring rain to take a quick look for the problem. The best part was when the window shattered after I slammed the door.

    3. Leaving work after swing shift, around midnight. Get on the freeway and lose all power - Look under the hood, but c'mon it is midnight can't see a damn thing. Turns out the clamp for hose on the intake manifold failed. No manifold pressure no go

    4. With GF driving, Bam - muffler completely falls off the car (~ 50,000 by this point) in heavy traffic. Fun running back on to the street to retrieve it

    5. Again with GF - card dies for no reason. Turns out the distributor was faulty design and the electronics within it "melted". Had a specialty shop fabricate a replacement - years later read that this was a known Ford defect.

    6. On way to GFs house - Turbo fails. On a hill. Car goes from ~ 100 HP to about 45. Like a fool take the turbo out and have it rebuilt

    7. Massive oil leak - however got smart and traded it in at that point. Leak was so bad on 25 mile drive to dealer had to add 2 quarts of oil.

    8. The best for last. The wheels that came on the car were metric. There was one tire that would fit - a very soft tire at that. They were $100 per tire and usually a set of four lasted 10,000 miles. It seemed like for every birthday or christmas somebody was buying me tires. I did manage to drive from Seattle to Whistler and back for a ski trip on 4 bald tires.

    Oh well, my girlfriend became my wife. :shades:
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    snakeweaselsnakeweasel Member Posts: 19,350
    20,000 miles from a used car dealer (mistake number 1), it was 4 years old with "low miles". In hindsight I really think somebody rolled back the miles. Anyway here is the list

    While highly unlikely it is possible for a 4 year old car to have only 20K miles on it. The last car my mom had was 10 years old with less than 50K on it. She rarely drove. But I would say it was rolled back.

    4. With GF driving, Bam - muffler completely falls off the car (~ 50,000 by this point) in heavy traffic. Fun running back on to the street to retrieve it

    Got that beat, back in the mid 70's my sister bought brand spanking new a Buick Apollo, the exhaust systems fell off a few blocks from the dealership as she was driving home. Thing had nothing but issues.

    Back in the early 80's I looked at the EXP, but I was smart and bought the Mustang.

    2011 Hyundai Sonata, 2014 BMW 428i convertible, 2015 Honda CTX700D

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    lemkolemko Member Posts: 15,261
    ...the Ford EXP and its Mercury clone the LN-7. My brother and I would joke that EXP stood for EXtensively Plastic. I remember the sales literare comparing the EXP to the classic two-seater 1955-57 Thunderbird. Talk about chutzpah
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    bhill2bhill2 Member Posts: 2,474
    Ah, yes. I remember my cousin referring to his Ford EXP as a Ford POS. I don't have the details, but the car generally deserved the name he gave it.

    2009 BMW 335i, 2003 Corvette cnv. (RIP 2001 Jaguar XK8 cnv and 1985 MB 380SE [the best of the lot])

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    nvbankernvbanker Member Posts: 7,239
    Yep, those were the years that ruined me for GM as well. Everything you described happened to mine as well, and I've never gone back. I also went to Ford, and was happy there ever since. Until, at least, they ruined Lincoln.
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