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Inconsiderate Drivers II (share your stories, etc.)

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Comments

  • ab348ab348 Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, CanadaPosts: 10,674
    edited January 4
    This may fall more into the category of idiotic rather than inconsiderate but it certainly has effects on other drivers.

    My city has two bridges spanning its harbor. The larger and newer (circa 1970) of the two is the only one that trucks over a certain size (3 tons I believe) can use, so it gets lots of truck traffic. There is a toll plaza with 7 or 8 lanes going in each direction and the 3 rightmost on each side are larger and taller lanes to accommodate trucks.

    In the nearly 50 years it has operated there have been only a few occasions where trucks have had mishaps at the tolls, until the last couple of years when it has begun to happen every couple of months. These always involve a truck trying to use the smaller car toll lanes. The latest was earlier this week with the expected result:




    It is difficult to pinpoint why this is suddenly happening much more frequently. Inexperienced drivers for sure, but it is hard to miss the many signs directing truck traffic to the larger toll booths. Perhaps impairment by marijuana use thanks to our lax enforcement of the use of that newly-legal substance? Distraction by cellphones and texting? Who knows. Whatever the reason, it is becoming expensive both for the owners of the trucks and the agency that operates the bridge. They are now looking into new and undoubtedly costly measures to try to idiot-proof the toll area.


    ETA: This link has a good video of the situation with new info on some of the other incidents. 14 such crashes this past year, I had no idea there were so many. Sorry for the Twitter link, I couldn't find a direct link to the report.

    2017 Cadillac ATS Performance Premium 3.6, 1968 Oldsmobile Cutlass S Holiday Coupe

  • fintailfintail Posts: 47,952
    I expected more out of AK people, like they would understand winter and deal with it. I guess that's like expecting Seattle drivers to be able to handle rain properly - good luck.

    I am usually on foot when I see the no-lighters. When possible, I will try to make eye contact with the driver, and point at the front of their car. It almost never works.
  • xwesxxwesx Fairbanks, AlaskaPosts: 13,012
    Continuance of yesterday.... my hands were a big sore this morning, and I couldn't figure out why. Then, I visited this thread and just chuckled as I recalled the refueling incident last night. Crazy.


    Anyhow, -37C here this morning (~ -35F). I didn't realize that Fairbanks still grew cold every once in a while!
    2014 Audi Q7 TDI, 2008 and 2013 Subaru Forester(s), 1969 Chevrolet C20 Pickup, 1969 Ford Econoline 100, 1976 Ford F250 Pickup
  • fintailfintail Posts: 47,952
    Re: the box truck vs tollbooth, reminds me of this:



    (there are many other videos of this spot)

    I blame poor driver training/ability and distraction. Probably a case of getting what you pay for.
  • ab348ab348 Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, CanadaPosts: 10,674
    edited January 4
    I like the ones where the roof is removed in one piece as if a can opener was applied to it. The one with the hay bales was pretty good too. The RV A/C units seem like easy pickings by comparison. I can understand vacationers and novice drivers of rental trucks getting caught, less so those who do it for a living.

    It is remarkable to see on others how the truck can be brought to an immediate stop upon contact. Amazing the bridge hasn't been damaged by the force of such impacts. That must hurt.

    THIS ONE at 10' 6" is even more lethal. I like the food truck with the slogan "Setting the Standard for Excellence" that gets destroyed.

    2017 Cadillac ATS Performance Premium 3.6, 1968 Oldsmobile Cutlass S Holiday Coupe

  • kyfdxkyfdx Everywhere, USAPosts: 126,124
    In WA, they can't even keep trains on the tracks... :(

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  • xwesxxwesx Fairbanks, AlaskaPosts: 13,012
    My favorite was near the end, when the truck makes a U-turn in the intersection just so he could slam into the barrier. :D
    2014 Audi Q7 TDI, 2008 and 2013 Subaru Forester(s), 1969 Chevrolet C20 Pickup, 1969 Ford Econoline 100, 1976 Ford F250 Pickup
  • ab348ab348 Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, CanadaPosts: 10,674
    Seems a worldwide problem. This one is international and some of the incidents look lethal.

    I wonder why drivers of trucks with dump bodies leave them upright?

    2017 Cadillac ATS Performance Premium 3.6, 1968 Oldsmobile Cutlass S Holiday Coupe

  • tjc78tjc78 South JerseyPosts: 8,720
    I think any of the really low ones should have that sacrificial bar ahead to protect the bridge.   Seems like money well spent. 

    2017 Buick Enclave / 2017 Hyundai Elantra (for a little longer) / 2019 Volvo S60 T6 Inscription

  • ruking1ruking1 Posts: 19,825
    edited January 5
    Obviously the state’s’ where this happens, do not think it’s money well spent to correct the situations, ban those (money making) vehicles, etc. Signage is obviously being ignored.

    Indeed it would be (wickedly, don’t try this at home ) funny if everybody started directing lost oversize trucks in the direction of the underside overpasses.🤪

    In CA, the custom has been for generations: someone has to die (in specific places) before actions (logical or mostly ill) are taken.
  • cdnpinheadcdnpinhead Forest Lakes, AZPosts: 4,593
    I hauled overdimensional loads for several years in the late '70s, up to 14'2" high and 12 feet wide. Professional drivers don't screw up like this, but as we all know, people who actually know what they're doing are in painfully short supply these days. When they are available, they cost more. Imagine.
  • ruking1ruking1 Posts: 19,825
    edited January 5
    In another life time, (mid 70’s) I too was licensed to haul oversize loads and explosives.

    Sentence #2 response. Absolutely no disrespect, but it is really not rocket science ( my other side of being licensed to haul...) . In addition, the (trucking) industry is contracting; not expanding. Overall the industry is forced to hire less drivers.

    Routes for professional drivers are normally well laid out.

    There is a well USED 3 lane each way route, curving through this town: that all manner of oversized traffic flows, i.e., one half of modular homes & huge home trailers, huge off road construction equipment, etc.. We routinely get up along either side of those rigs with NO real fear. The drivers literally guide their rigs like they are on rails. If one is really looking, one can see/sense if these drivers convey confidence or fear.
  • fintailfintail Posts: 47,952
    On the theme of turn lanes from the off topic forum: Almost every day my evening commute takes me on a road where I turn left, one turn lane onto a two lane in each direction street. There's also a right turn lane across from my lane, which of course is red when we have green. All seemed normal today, we got green, people started trudging along. In the opposing right turn lane, a big white GMC (I think) pickup with a sign on the side bullies its way through red and enters the line of cars turning left, causing them to slow. Me being me, I lay on the horn, and the donkey's butt driving the pickup motions something out his window. He gets stuck in the right lane, I go by on the left, and he is still moving around, trying to get into the left lane to get into the next turn lane (I was going straight). Eventually, he got stuck in a jam and was far behind me. Something about 4x4s and bullying traffic. Try that stunt in LA Houston or Chicago, and it might not end well.
  • xwesxxwesx Fairbanks, AlaskaPosts: 13,012
    edited January 12
    Wait, so why would this guy have needed to bully his way into the line? If he was turning right, could he not have just used the right lane since the rest of you were turning left (and, presumably, into the left of the two lanes?). That is just silliness.

    We have an intersection here with a fueling station / convenience store on the corner. Many folks turning left onto the street that accesses this site follow up with an immediate right into the lot, so I tend to be extra cautious when making a right there during any left-turn periods since the turners do need to access the right lane very quickly after the intersection. However, at most intersections, I just make my right as people are turning left. If they decide to pull into the far right lane as part of their turn, my being in "their way" is simply their own fault. :D

    Likewise, if I am making a left turn during a "yield on green" period, I do not wait for right turners to take my left since we have separate lanes. Again, if they create a conflict, then their problem. I'm not on the road to soothe their egos by validating their poor lane discipline.
    2014 Audi Q7 TDI, 2008 and 2013 Subaru Forester(s), 1969 Chevrolet C20 Pickup, 1969 Ford Econoline 100, 1976 Ford F250 Pickup
  • fintailfintail Posts: 47,952
    He was turning right on red in front of left turning traffic who had a green light, then trying to veer into the left lane to get to the next intersection. He should have just waited til he had a green light, as it didn't seem he was capable of turning the corner and staying in the right lane - not that anyone pulls into the correct (nearest) lane anyway. And with a business sign on the truck - probably his dad's or something.

    Dual turn lanes also get to me - whenever possible, I try to have nobody beside me, I don't trust most drivers here.
  • xwesxxwesx Fairbanks, AlaskaPosts: 13,012
    edited January 12
    fintail said:

    He was turning right on red in front of left turning traffic who had a green light, then trying to veer into the left lane to get to the next intersection. He should have just waited til he had a green light, as it didn't seem he was capable of turning the corner and staying in the right lane - not that anyone pulls into the correct (nearest) lane anyway. And with a business sign on the truck - probably his dad's or something.

    Dual turn lanes also get to me - whenever possible, I try to have nobody beside me, I don't trust most drivers here.

    Okay, I get it now. He *could* have turned without conflict, but was trying to do the same thing that so many left turners do: Failure to take the nearest lane. Thanks for clarifying!
    2014 Audi Q7 TDI, 2008 and 2013 Subaru Forester(s), 1969 Chevrolet C20 Pickup, 1969 Ford Econoline 100, 1976 Ford F250 Pickup
  • ruking1ruking1 Posts: 19,825
    edited January 12
    fintail said:

    He was turning right on red in front of left turning traffic who had a green light, then trying to veer into the left lane to get to the next intersection. He should have just waited til he had a green light, as it didn't seem he was capable of turning the corner and staying in the right lane - not that anyone pulls into the correct (nearest) lane anyway. And with a business sign on the truck - probably his dad's or something.

    Dual turn lanes also get to me - whenever possible, I try to have nobody beside me, I don't trust most drivers here.

    This also describes what can happen on the left/right lane/s turn/s also! The answers can be/are simple & safer. Get in (left/right hand turn lanes) line/s far earlier. Go to the next turn, come back around either left or right.

    As for sounding the horn ? To me, 9.5/10 it’s absolutely pointless, because they (the perp) already know(s) what they are doing. Giving no quarter, or signaling to turn into the perp seems to work better.

    Again, I would have to defer to your judgment. The “younger entitled set” driving daddy’s P/U/car can be a set of losers.
  • fintailfintail Posts: 47,952
    Really, even though it is a legal "free" turn, one would have to be brave to take it around here, where so many cars don't go for the nearest lane when turning.

    Regarding the horn, pressure release valve, it feels good. And it is a faux pas to the uptight "civil" passive aggressive local mentality, which makes it that much better.
    xwesx said:



    Okay, I get it now. He *could* have turned without conflict, but was trying to do the same thing that so many left turners do: Failure to take the nearest lane. Thanks for clarifying!


  • ruking1ruking1 Posts: 19,825
    edited January 13
    fintail said:

    Really, even though it is a legal "free" turn, one would have to be brave to take it around here, where so many cars don't go for the nearest lane when turning.

    Regarding the horn, pressure release valve, it feels good. And it is a faux pas to the uptight "civil" passive aggressive local mentality, which makes it that much better.

    xwesx said:



    Okay, I get it now. He *could* have turned without conflict, but was trying to do the same thing that so many left turners do: Failure to take the nearest lane. Thanks for clarifying!


    ‘Tis good to get ones’ jollies off !? 😜

    There were times, I had high dB air horns mounted. We didn’t have to use them much. Most sane folks really didn’t want to cut close in front of high torque forward moving push bars & tubular fences. 😉 But anymore, it’s been easy to see what’s going to happen before it actually does.
  • fintailfintail Posts: 47,952
    Semi horns on a normal car could be fun. Yes, a nice honk can feel good now and then, especially with the timid inept idiots here. Funny that when I've driven in Europe, I don't recall needing to use the horn. Heck, even on my recent trip to Chicago and Detroit etc, people knew how to keep moving.
  • ruking1ruking1 Posts: 19,825
    edited January 13
    Indeed * 2!

    It actually makes me wax historic, to the time/s when horns lights/high beams, turn signals, etc. used to be a part of “old” school language/driving. There are indeed precious few who practice this; let alone know what some of the signals mean. Some truckers understand & practice this.
  • fintailfintail Posts: 47,952
    I see that now and then too, a horn or high beams used as communication, not rage. I doubt many would understand it these days, especially in metro areas. In some places, those are still communication tools, I think I recall seeing roads in India being a chatter of horns, not in rage, just people letting others know they are there.
  • ruking1ruking1 Posts: 19,825
    edited January 14
    When passing on two lane roads, (like in New Mexico) I make sure my low beams and sometimes high beams are on. Many times, if you’re passing a tractor trailer truck, they will aid you by blowing a horn or flashing lights. One easy signal, the rig hits the rear brake lamps. Once it’s “clear” to pass, use the left turn signal. When it’s safe to come back in your own lane, make a right turn signal.

    Kudos to the state of New Mexico for clearly marking passing areas & starting/ending boundaries. But I have to say it’s a tad sobering to see a lot of “white crosses” in areas that don’t make a lot of logical sense.😩
  • xwesxxwesx Fairbanks, AlaskaPosts: 13,012
    Curious bit this morning...

    For several miles, there was a third-gen Subaru Outback ahead of me on the highway by a small distance. Small meaning that I was cruising along a few seconds behind it for much of the time. At one point, I see a school bus in the left lane ahead, so I re-positioned to the right lane in order to increase my chances of making it through the upcoming intersection without having to stop for the light that was likely to change any moment.

    I was cruising at about 60 or a touch over after having just passed a vehicle in the right lane. The Subaru was still in the left lane, approaching the bus, and maybe a second ahead of me (three or four car lengths). At this point, the driver really had not slowed at all, so I got a strong suspicion that he was planning to shift right (in front of me) to pass. However, no signal, no indication of any kind. As such, I maintained speed and continued to close the distance.

    Now that the Subaru is really getting close to the bus, the driver makes the choice to jump in front of me (signaled as the car was already changing lanes) with now under a second separating us. As soon as the lane change occurred, I dropped the accelerator pedal so my car would slow and I could re-establish a reasonable following distance. And, instead of maintaining or increasing speed, the driver slows down (no brakes, but obviously decelerating). Our vehicles closed distance until I was maybe a car length behind, and finally I decided I would have to use the brakes to shed more speed. Once I fell back into a decent pace, I was going about 50 behind the Subaru, which finally finished passing the bus and went back to the left lane. However, once it was in the left lane and I returned to 60, the car pulled away from me.

    I just don't get what the driver was doing.... Other than that head-scratcher, it seemed like the driver was being smooth and consistent, etc, so it was like they just fell asleep for a moment. LOL
    2014 Audi Q7 TDI, 2008 and 2013 Subaru Forester(s), 1969 Chevrolet C20 Pickup, 1969 Ford Econoline 100, 1976 Ford F250 Pickup
  • ruking1ruking1 Posts: 19,825
    Hmmmm..... but yes, smooth and consistent is what its really all about !
  • ab348ab348 Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, CanadaPosts: 10,674
    ruking1 said:

    Indeed * 2!

    It actually makes me wax historic, to the time/s when horns lights/high beams, turn signals, etc. used to be a part of “old” school language/driving. There are indeed precious few who practice this; let alone know what some of the signals mean. Some truckers understand & practice this.

    I recall as a little kid in the 1960s when all our highways here were 2-lanes, that Dad would always do a quick beep-beep on the horn when he pulled into the (empty) oncoming lane to pass a slower car. Nobody got upset.

    2017 Cadillac ATS Performance Premium 3.6, 1968 Oldsmobile Cutlass S Holiday Coupe

  • tjc78tjc78 South JerseyPosts: 8,720
    ab348 said:
    Indeed * 2! It actually makes me wax historic, to the time/s when horns lights/high beams, turn signals, etc. used to be a part of “old” school language/driving. There are indeed precious few who practice this; let alone know what some of the signals mean. Some truckers understand & practice this.
    I recall as a little kid in the 1960s when all our highways here were 2-lanes, that Dad would always do a quick beep-beep on the horn when he pulled into the (empty) oncoming lane to pass a slower car. Nobody got upset.
    Today you would probably get a one finger salute for that!

    2017 Buick Enclave / 2017 Hyundai Elantra (for a little longer) / 2019 Volvo S60 T6 Inscription

  • fintailfintail Posts: 47,952
    Sounds like someone dozed off, yeah.

    I beeped twice today - first at some kind of Civrolla box that was going around a corner at 2mph and holding up traffic, another at an ILX (I think) that decided to stumble into my lane as I was beside it - then shot back when I honked. Normal day.

    Two no-lighters - Venza and Focus. Also saw a Prius with parking lights and fog lights but no headlights.
  • ruking1ruking1 Posts: 19,825
    edited January 16
    My last witnessed alledged “falling asleep @ the wheel” incident (admittedly a long time ago) was on an early morning inbound trip to Las Vegas, NV. On the Las Vegas outbound direction/route, (toward CA) I saw in the distance a dark (what looked to be) tornadoes, As the dust settled, & as I approached, a then upside sedan was coming to rest. I resumed speed, dialing 911. Later, the incident hit the early morning Las Vegas, NV area news.

    To more pressing news: I was reading that opioid deaths (49,000 per year) kill more people than car crashes. (34,500)
  • ab348ab348 Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, CanadaPosts: 10,674
    My witnessing an asleep at the wheel incident happened maybe 10 years ago. One afternoon I was on a divided expressway with a large grassy median separating the two roadways that was in the shape of a shallow valley. Traffic was light and I was in the left lane doing about 70mph, having been some distance behind a late model Honda Civic for a while. I noticed the Honda drifting gradually to the left, onto the paved, then gravel shoulder, before continuing left and making its way onto the grass. The grassy area was not perfectly smooth so the Civic began experiencing a series of bumps before encountering a larger one that got it slightly airborne. I had let off the gas during all this so my speed was probably less than his when all this happened. After the big bump the driver regained control, slowed, and began piloting the Honda back towards the roadway as I went past. The guy was incredibly lucky not to have done serious damage to himself, the car, and others on the road.

    2017 Cadillac ATS Performance Premium 3.6, 1968 Oldsmobile Cutlass S Holiday Coupe

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