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Honda Civic: Problems & Solutions

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Comments

  • blueiedgodblueiedgod Posts: 2,798
    I remember that "60 Minutes" story.

    I've often wondered whether after-market performance seats like Corbeau, Recaro, etc. are safer than the OEM seats in most cars?


    The non adjustable racing seats will most likley be better in that aspect. There are only a few cars on the market that come with racing seats from the factory: Civic Si, Focus SVT, Ion Red Line, and that's about it. People commonly complain that they are too hard or restrictive for wide bottomed/back people. This would cut 90% of US population from using those. Maybe this is why they are most often found on sport compacts and not larger sporty cars.
  • kauai215kauai215 Posts: 190
    Do you know whether the problems with seats in rear collisions are the whole seat ripping out of its mounting on the floor, or is it the seatback latch mechanism failing, allowing the seat back to lay down?
  • blueiedgodblueiedgod Posts: 2,798
    Do you know whether the problems with seats in rear collisions are the whole seat ripping out of its mounting on the floor, or is it the seatback latch mechanism failing, allowing the seat back to lay down?

    The problem discussed here and on TV was the latch failing and allowing the seatback to recline flat. Which in itself, is probably not too bad as the impact is absorbed over a greater distance, although radial, than it would have been had the seatback remained fixed.

    I am not aware of instances when the seats were ripped from the seat rails by the impact. And if they were, the impact must have been greater than any human would survived to tell about. Theoretically, everything has a failure point. So, yes you can rip the seat rails from the floor, you can break the seat from the seat rails, you can crunch the whole car into a 2x3 cube, and wring the juice out of it.
  • I took my 97 honda civic to the dealer because of the clicking sound when turning my wheel. They said both of my cv boots were turn and that all the oil have leaked out. They said it would cost $518.00 to replace. This is alot of money. I researched cv joint and read an article that said that i could get a rebuilt axle assembly with new boots and joints for about $100.00 each. This would be alot cheaper. But I don't know where to go from here. Anyone have any suggestions?
  • Hey everyone,

    I just bought a 2005 Civic EX Special Edition w/ an automatic transmission about a month ago and it currently has 1500 miles on it. When I slowly brake from a speed faster than 40 mph, the car seems to jolt as it comes to a stop. It jolts ONCE at the speed of around 20-25 mph. What's strange is that it only happens if I gradually and slowly stop. Meaning, I would keep my foot on the brake pedal and steadily increase the pressure slowly. However, if I need to suddenly stop, such is in stop-and-go city traffic, the jolt never occurs. Therefore, I don't know if it's a problem with my car, or if anyone else has had the same problem. Also, I don't know if it's my brakes or the automatic transmission as it downshifts. I've never had the feeling with my previous automatic cars. I'd appreciate anyone who could help, thanks.
  • robr2robr2 BostonPosts: 8,863
    read an article that said that i could get a rebuilt axle assembly with new boots and joints for about $100.00 each.

    When I had the same issue, my mechanic suggested replacing the axles at the same time since you have to remove them anyway to do the boot. Find yourself a competent mechanic who can do the job including providing the parts. Shop around and good luck.
  • After market companies such as Beck-Arnley and A1 Cardone make driveshafts for Hondas. Most auto parts stores stock their products. Most Honda dealers also stock remanufactured Honda driveshafts, though they are expensive. Since driveshaft replacement is beyond the capability of your typical DIYer, find a reputable independent mechanic to do the job. He will know where to get quality remufactured parts.
  • Hi, st0plieing. It sounds to me like your Civic is using its transmission to slow down while braking. My 2003 Civic LX (automatic) also does this. I forgot what fancy term they call it, but basically the transmission downshifts to assist with stopping. It feels like you're slowing down and all of the sudden your brakes catch on really strong and you hear your transmission whirr. None of my other cars had this feature and I personally find it really annoying, but there isn't anything that can be done about it other than just get used to it. Once you do, you'll hardly even notice it.
  • blueiedgodblueiedgod Posts: 2,798
    It is simply downshifting like a manual would to assist braking.

    It is probably somewhere in your manual if you got one with your car. It seems alot of people on these boards don't get the manuals with their cars?? (sarcasm, for those who don't know me)
  • blueiedgodblueiedgod Posts: 2,798
    I took my 97 honda civic to the dealer because of the clicking sound when turning my wheel. They said both of my cv boots were turn and that all the oil have leaked out. They said it would cost $518.00 to replace. This is alot of money. I researched cv joint and read an article that said that i could get a rebuilt axle assembly with new boots and joints for about $100.00 each. This would be alot cheaper. But I don't know where to go from here. Anyone have any suggestions?

    You can go with a rebuilt axles for about $160-$170 installed. Or buy them at your local Auto Zone/Pepe boys/Advance auto parts with core refund. Although it is not a simple job, it is doable by DIY'er.
  • Hi there,

    I have a 1997 Civic DX sedan w/ 119000 miles on it. Just had the oil changed as well as the timing belt and water pump.

    At the time the mechanic suggested I do the plugs on a follow up -- I am planning to do that shortly.

    In the last week, however, I have noticed an issue with acceleration on starting from a stop. It sputters a bit on 1st, shifting to 2nd, and 3rd -- once I hit 4th and 5th it's pretty much fine (I've had no problem with highway driving).

    However, if I hit a hill in 5th it will sputter instead of just slow down on the hill.

    Obviously I need to have this checked - but I was wondering if this could be a fuel injection problem or just really dirty plugs?

    Thanks!

    Kristin
  • i need help please. i took my 97 honda civic to get inspected today and it failed. when they went to hook the car up to the computer, nothing showed up on it. It was blank, just flat out nothing. thats not supposed to happen so they failed me. i have no idea what is causing that. i need help on this please.
  • nine51nine51 Posts: 78
    It can be done by a competent DIY'r but you will need a few tools most shade tree mechanics don't have. You will need good jacks and a set of jack stands to get the front end in the air. An impact wrench is a must to get the axle nuts off, (or a 6 ft long cheater;>)and the castle nut holding the ball joint to the lower control arm is also a PITA without an impact wrench. If the car has been in salt, most of the nuts will be very difficult to get off. You should replace the axle nuts with new ones because you will probably chew up the old ones getting it loose.

    My son and I have done 2 pairs of CV joints on Civics this summer and it can be done at home, but it's not fun. #@*$^# rust! We replaced the whole axles with rebuilts.
  • dalawdalaw Posts: 37
    yeah if you glance at your tachometer you will see that the jolt is accompanied by an increase in engine rpm. Don't worry, every automatic Honda does this. Think its called Grade Logic control, when the transmission downshifts.
  • blueiedgodblueiedgod Posts: 2,798
    i need help please. i took my 97 honda civic to get inspected today and it failed. when they went to hook the car up to the computer, nothing showed up on it. It was blank, just flat out nothing. thats not supposed to happen so they failed me. i have no idea what is causing that. i need help on this please.

    If they did not give you a print out why they failed you, sounds like they are a crooker shop. Insist that they give you a detailed print out what areas your car failed at. If it is emissions, you should have a print out of the state minimums and your car's results. If it is safety, they should give you a print out with the safety items indicated. Look at your receipt, or whatever papers they gave you. They can't fail you without telling you and showing proof that your vehicle failed and what needs to be done to be road worthy.
  • I have had my transmission replaced once already. Now I have been told my transmission needs to be replaced again. my transmission is no longer covered. i would like to know what i can do to get the transmission replaced without paying for it. i have had numerous problems with my honda. i was told it was because it is a belted trans and only a small number of civils were made this way. i have complained time after time when i had problems with the car and was always told there was nothing wrong. the dealership is finally confessing to a problem. please help i don't know who to contact, i would like to know who owns honda.
    thank you in advance.
  • blueiedgodblueiedgod Posts: 2,798
    I have had my transmission replaced once already. Now I have been told my transmission needs to be replaced again. my transmission is no longer covered. i would like to know what i can do to get the transmission replaced without paying for it. i have had numerous problems with my honda. i was told it was because it is a belted trans and only a small number of civils were made this way. i have complained time after time when i had problems with the car and was always told there was nothing wrong. the dealership is finally confessing to a problem. please help i don't know who to contact, i would like to know who owns honda.
    thank you in advance.


    Sounds like you have a Civic HX with CVT auto.
    Call Honda customer support number in the back of you Honda Owners manual and complain. If you had pre existing condition and were maintaining your Honda at the dealer, they may split the cost with you. You mention that you complained earlier, while it was still in warranty, if you have receipts stating your complaint, you are still under warranty. Your vehicle showed symptoms, but was not properly diagnosed by the servicing dealer.

    As to who owns Honda, Originally it was Juinichiro Honda, a bicylce maker. Now, it is probably a board of directors, since Mugen Honda is in jail on tax evasion charges. Although, Juinichiro never gave Mugen holding power, this is why Mugen started his own aftermarket company for Honda.
  • I just bought a '96 Civic LX sedan for my son w/100K miles. When fuel gauge got near empty, my son tried filling it up but it only took around 4 gallons, and gauge only goes up to half full. Anybody have any similar (bad) experiences with Civic fuel gauges? Know what it might be, and what it entails to fix (cost?)

    thanks
  • blueiedgodblueiedgod Posts: 2,798
    I just bought a '96 Civic LX sedan for my son w/100K miles. When fuel gauge got near empty, my son tried filling it up but it only took around 4 gallons, and gauge only goes up to half full. Anybody have any similar (bad) experiences with Civic fuel gauges? Know what it might be, and what it entails to fix (cost?)

    thanks


    Have you tried taking it to a different pump/gas station? 4 gallons sounds like a half tank on a 10-13 gallon tank. Maybe the pump had a bad shut off mechanism.
    Otherwise, it is most likley a fuel level sending unit. Although repair is not difficult, you do need to remove the back seat bottoms to acess the top of the fuel tank. Remove the spin nut or couple of screws, take out the fuel pump and sending unit combo.
    It could also be the fuel gauge in the gauge cluster it self. Either something is sticking there, or it burnt. Honda uses motors and gears to make needles move, instead of bi-metal coils and heating elements found in most other vehicles. Blowing air to remove the junk in the gears may help, if not then the fuel gauge can be replaced from the cluster. A used one should not cost more than $30 at a junk yard.
  • i have an 03 civic ex 5spd manual. i had the slave cylinder replaced at 20,700 mi. my shifter seems notchy. when accelerating, shifting from 1st to 2nd, very notchy and sometimes a slight grind. i know that the clutch is fully depressed. it's been like this since before the new cylinder. between other gears it's fine. this also occurs between 1st and 2nd when decelerating. am i shifting too fast? because i know i'm not. i feel like i have to shift in slow motion for this not to occur. also when reversing and then shifting into 1st there is a "clunk", unless the wheels are completely stopped. and i mean i don't reverse at 90mph or anything but out of a parking spot. advise please. thank you.
  • blueiedgodblueiedgod Posts: 2,798
    i have an 03 civic ex 5spd manual. i had the slave cylinder replaced at 20,700 mi. my shifter seems notchy. when accelerating, shifting from 1st to 2nd, very notchy and sometimes a slight grind. i know that the clutch is fully depressed. it's been like this since before the new cylinder. between other gears it's fine. this also occurs between 1st and 2nd when decelerating. am i shifting too fast? because i know i'm not. i feel like i have to shift in slow motion for this not to occur. also when reversing and then shifting into 1st there is a "clunk", unless the wheels are completely stopped. and i mean i don't reverse at 90mph or anything but out of a parking spot. advise please. thank you.

    Define "Notchy." Can you dissern between "notchy" and "crisp." Honda's manuals have been described as crisp.
    Grind is usually assosiated with not fully released clutch. Make sure you press the clutch all the way in. You should give synchros some time to spool up the next gear. 1 to 2 shifts are shorter and you are probably doing it too fast, causing the notchiness. Try to slow the 1 to 2 shift as if they were 2 to 3 shifts.

    Honda reverse does not have synchros. You should stop completley before shifting into reverse, and sometimes shift into 1st, then reverse to line up the gears. Same applies to going from reverse to 1st, you have to be completley stopped, or just rolling at 0.1 mph.
  • My girl just bought a '99 Civic EX sedan with 62k on it. I know there is a TSB on the A/C belt tensioner I have the updated one since ours is making more noise than it should. But even with the P/S pump out I can't get the nut off the pulley shaft?
  • I don't know.. You're tranny sounds like its acting a lot different than mine. I have an 03 Ex Coupe 5spd. as well. I can literally tear through the gears if I wanted to with absolutely no problems with grinding or hesitation. The shifts are very precise. Going into reverse from a forward gear, I always make sure I'm completly stopped and also shift into a forward gear before shifting into reverse instead of just going straight from neutral to reverse. This stops any remaining forward momentum the gears may have to prevent grinding. However I never have any clunk or anything going from reverse to 1st while still rolling backward as long as I have the clutch fully depressed. Good luck.
  • I have 2004 Civic VP 2-dr automatic which is getting 32-33 mpg. About 90% of my driving is pure highway at 80mph (no passengers, no extra weight). I know efficiency drops at that speed, but does that sound about right, or should I have the dealer look at it? (It has nearly 10k miles)

    Secondly, since I've owned it, there's been a low-intensity whistling sound that seems to come from the right rear corner, most noticable around 40mph. The pitch of the sound changes with speed and is present only when in motion. I'm quite certain it's not wind resistance or tire tread noise. I'll mention it at the 10k checkup but wondered if anyone here has seen this or had thoughts?

    Thank you.
  • I have 2004 Civic VP 2-dr automatic which is getting 32-33 mpg. About 90% of my driving is pure highway at 80mph (no passengers, no extra weight). I know efficiency drops at that speed, but does that sound about right, or should I have the dealer look at it?

    The EPA mileage ratings for your Civic are 32/38; 32-33 MPG at the speeds youre driving seems reasonable. If youre really concerned theres something wrong, try driving at the speed limit for an entire tank of fuel and then check your fuel mileage.

    From the US DoE and EPA fueleconomy.gov website:

    Gas mileage decreases rapidly at speeds above 60 mph. Each 5 mph you drive over 60 mph is like paying an additional $0.10 per gallon for gas.

    image

    :)
  • ruking1ruking1 Posts: 19,825
    I can't address your second concern, but on the first one, I would say, given your speeds, 32-33 mpg sounds about ball park. There might be a host of things to try both behaviorally and structurally.

    My 2004 Honda Civic VP, 4 door, automatic, is rated at 29/38 mpg. With 3000 miles on the clock, the mpg range has been between 35-39.5 mpg (almost 40) with up to 3 persons in the car.(large freeway component also)

    During the break in, I was "flogging" it and so to me a lower 35 mpg was not a surprize. This does not entail "abuse", but more like 3/4's of redline acceleration (45-75 mph), air conditioning on, etc and attempts to get the automatic to "kick down" so I would not drone on at a constant rpm. So to me, more like standard break in procedures. 37 mpg was the standard 80-85 mph highway cruise. 39 mpg is for the standard highway commute 50 R/T.

    Some structual things you might try. 1. TP 30-35 psi,(mine is at 35/36) 2. Mobil One 0w20, (research seems to indicate app 1-3 mph better) I am still on Honda 5w20 oil oem fill. (made by ExxonMobil aka, Superflo)

    Some behavioral things 1. smoother acceleration 2. slower acceleration 3. less automatic transmission kick down 4 little to no use of the brakes 4. do not use the engine for "engine" braking
  • blueiedgodblueiedgod Posts: 2,798
    4. do not use the engine for "engine" braking

    I have to disagree on that one. Engine braking produces very high instanteneous fuel efficiency numbers. The simplest explanation for this, is the fact that you need to use fuel to idle. When you engine brake, the driving wheels force the engine to spin faster than just idling, without increase in gasoline consumption. Although, in the Honda line up only the hybrids have MPG meters, if you have acess to a BMW or any other vehicle with an instateneous MPG gauge try engine braking. I was able to get close to 90 mpg by in the engine braking cycle.

    This is one of the reasons manuals provide better fuel efficinecy, but not the major reason. Honda automatics also down shift when you slow down, instead of going into neutral like most other autos on the market.
  • ruking1ruking1 Posts: 19,825
    At the end of the day, instantaneous mph readings of 90 mpg are not converting/ happening for this fellow. I easily can get instantaneous readings of close to 99 mpg on a Z06 Corvette. BUT again that converts to something like between 26-32 mpg. So assuming there is nothing technically wrong with his car, the most direct variable, given any set of circumstances is the driver's input/behavior. So I stand by what I say. Also since I have a Civic, I more than understand in this particular model the automatic, automatically downshifts. Nowhere did I say try to circumvent that!? Again these vehicles are not designed to be downshifted for engine braking, like say a multiple gear diesel truck rig, where engine braking is an intergral part of braking. Can they be? OF COURSE! Upshot: 1. change of brake pads and drums is far cheaper than a change of engine, transmission? With far less component wear and 2. in this fellow's and my case better mpg. I will almost guarantee you my mph will go down if I started to engine brake in any of these 2 cars and the one mentioned in the next paragraph migh have a slight variation! Would you agree?

    I also have a "drive by wire" VW Jetta TDI, 5 speed manual which on a long downhill descent does "shut down" fuel consumption. This of course is absolutely wonderful for a host of reasons, but it does have marginal engine braking.
  • Gas mileage for the first 8 tanks in my 2004 DX averaged 36.5 mpg with 10-20% highway driving and the rest country and city, with a fairly light foot. Alas about 3 mpg worse than my 1992 DX!
         I have a ten mile commute to work and if the traffic allows, coast down a 2 mile hill at about 40 mph in 4th gear. Two questions: 1) Why should this influence my mileage? 2) Is this likely to be causing a strain on the drive train? (My last Civic was still doing fine after 135,000 miles except for a little what I assume was piston slap on cold starts.)
  • ruking1ruking1 Posts: 19,825
    1 If you are "coasting" i.e. IN drive and assuming that is a "safe" speed in descent, you are drawing the least amount of fuel for conditions. (short of a total shut down which I DO NOT recommend) Since it is a short descent you migh try it in drive and with "engine braking" doing it in D3 and comparing the averages!! My two cents is on using drive having better mpg than d3, i.e. slightly. Since you indicate 4th gear, you could try this comparison in a higher gear. My .02 cents would be for better fuel mileage in a higher gear while descending.

    2. So no more than normal operation in correct parameters on both auto and stick.

    3. On a manual transmission, generally you have a better chance of over reving on "engine braking" rather than trying to rev it up beyond redline. Normally computer controls will cut fuel or whatever system the oem has put in place to prevent over reving on upshifting . HOWEVER no such controls usually exist on the DOWN shifting!!!! So it is more than simple when downshifting to over rev past redline. This is not a good practice.
  • jaa37jaa37 Posts: 67
    I sometimes throw my AT Civic into neutral going down hills or when I'm on a long straightaway and see a red light in the distance. Is it bad for the car to shift into neutral from drive while moving (sometimes at 45 mph or so), or vice versa?
  • ruking1ruking1 Posts: 19,825
    I would not get into the habit!

    But at the same time, when you operate a stick shift; neutral is really "part" of the normal operation of a manual tramsmission.
  • edunnettedunnett Posts: 553
    If you are sure that your foot is completely depressed on the clutch when shifting and you still get the grinding, there is little doubt you have a bad synchro. If the grind is when you shift into 2nd gear (up or down shifting) then the problem is your 2nd gear synchro. That will be covered under your warranty but your dealer will need to reproduce the problem to diagnose it. If you shift really slow ("granny shifting"), you can avoid the grinding because you give the gears more time to synch up speeds with the engine without relying as much on the crappy synchro. If you shift really fast, you will increase the speed by which the synchro fails - which is good and bad depending on how quickly you want to it to be easily reproducable for your dealer vs how reliably you'd like to have the car behave. :-)

    As for reverse - NEVER shift into reverse when the wheels are still moving, even if you're only rolling at 1mph. Stop completely before shifting to reverse. Japanese trannies often are a bit sticky getting into reverse and as another poster mentioned, shifting to first or second gear before going into reverse often helps it shift more smoothly. Also, never shift into a forward gear when your wheels are moving in reverse at all. Do not tell your dealer that you shift that way or they may deem the tranny abused by you and void your warranty.

    Elissa
  • edunnettedunnett Posts: 553
    First of all, this is a great question. It's good that you think about your driving habits and how that can effect the operation and longevity of your car.

    Putting your transmission (auto or manual) in neutral to coast is generally a bad idea since you have less control over the car and thus it's less safe. It uses an insignificant amount of gas when going downhill and not under load. So I don't see the point in having the car coast in neutral. I'm not sure how the automatic transmission handles shifting from neutral to a drive gear while moving (like when you're done coasting) but this is bad bad bad for a manual transmission unless you 'rev match' or 'double clutch' to match the engine rpm with the transmission rpm. If you don't know what any of that means, you're best bet is to keep your car in the most appropriate drive gear for acceleration or engine braking. Example, I drive down a 4 mile 5% grade hill every day. In my manual transmission car I take it at 40mph in 3rd or 4th gear and in my automatic I leave it in drive going down that hill. Sometimes I'll turn the overdrive off to avoid excessive automatic transmission shifting on the hilly roads but that's not terribly necessary. Bottom line: leave it in drive/gear is my advice.
    Elissa
  • Putting the automatic transmission into "neutral" going down hills might be causing damage to the transmission depending on the make up of the Valve Body and the Lubricating Circuits of the trans. Vital parts might not be getting lubrication unless the trans is in a forward drive position. I WOULD NOT DO THIS!
  • jaa37jaa37 Posts: 67
    This brings up another question I've sometimes wondered about (and this may show how little I know about the inner workings of cars, I don't know). When you're driving, say, 55 mph, and you take your foot off the gas, the RPM remains approximately the same, even when going downhill. Why is that? Is the engine still working just as hard? If so, then wouldn't it use almost as much gas even when going downhill as it does going on flat ground?
  • kauai215kauai215 Posts: 190
    You wrote:
    “When you're driving, say, 55 mph, and you take your foot off the gas, the RPM remains approximately the same, even when going downhill. Why is that?”

    Let me see if I can help you to understand this phenomenon.

    Imagine a child’s bike or even a tricycle where the pedals are inextricably connected to the drive wheel without any freewheel mechanism. When the pedals turn, the wheel turns. Conversely, when the wheel is turning, the pedals are turning, too; they’re locked together. You don’t even need to ride the bike to turn the pedals, just roll the bike along, which will cause the drive wheel to rotate, and the pedals will rotate, too, despite the fact no one is pushing the pedals. Right?

    It’s a locked system.

    Your car is essentially the same, if somewhat more complicated.

    Push starting a car, for example, depends upon this. The car is placed in neutral and pushed a ways to build up some speed. Then the driver puts it in gear, which is then connected to the drive wheels, and the engine turns over, hopefully starting up.

    When the car is in gear, the engine is connected to the drive wheels. It’s essentially a locked system, just like the child’s tricycle, but, unlike the tricycle, an automobile has a transmission system that permits the driver to disconnect the engine from the transmission, and thus disconnect it from the drive wheels.

    In a manual transmission car, if you leave the car in gear, and bring the car to a complete stop . . . you’ll stall the engine. Right? When you stop the wheels on a manual transmission car that is in gear, you’ve also forcibly stopped the engine. You’ll lurch to a stop, and need to restart the engine. And then you’ll look around furtively to see if anyone saw you do this! Hopefully, no one you know. ;-)

    Now, an automatic transmission is designed to permit the car to come to a stop at engine idle speed and still remain in gear. That’s one of the benefits of an automatic, especially if one frequently drives in stop-and-go traffic. It can get tiresome to keep declutching and shifting a manual into neutral in such traffic.

    While driving along at 55 mph, if you put your car in neutral, or just declutch on a manual, you’ll see the rpms drop to idle speed. Try it, you’ll see. (But maybe not in heavy traffic. . .)

    Has this helped you see how it works?

    You wrote:
    “Is the engine still working just as hard? [coasting downhill]”

    No, because the throttle is closed, and the engine is now just “along for the ride,” being driven by the wheels. Kind of like the kid on the tricycle rolling downhill along the driveway; he’s not driving the pedals, and his feet are just “along for the ride.”

    You wrote:
    “If so, then wouldn't it use almost as much gas even when going downhill as it does going on flat ground?”

    No. Again, because the throttle is closed and very little fuel is being delivered to the engine. You’d get great fuel economy if you could just figure out how to commute to work and back. . . and arrange for it to be downhill in both directions! ;-)

    Fuel consumption is directly related to throttle position; when the throttle is closed, the engine is using minimal fuel, and conversely, when the throttle is wide open, the engine is using the most fuel.

    I hope this helps you and others to see how these things work.
  • ruking1ruking1 Posts: 19,825
    To throw a non Honda example in the mix, it even can be better! I have a VW Jetta TDI with the "drivebywire" technology. So there have been some discussions of whether it is more fuel friendly to idle in neural going down a long long mountain stretch or let it "coast in 5th gear. In the Jetta idling in neutral actually consumes more fuel down a long downhill stretch than if you let it coast in 5th gear!!!Upshot better mpg down the long downhill stretch IN GEAR with no throttle inputs!
  • kauai215kauai215 Posts: 190
    You wrote:
    “In the Jetta idling in neutral actually consumes more fuel down a long downhill stretch than if you let it coast in 5th gear!!!Upshot better mpg down the long downhill stretch IN GEAR with no throttle inputs!”

    I don’t mean to get too far afield here, but I seem to recall that the cpu in the TDI will actually shut off fuel delivery under these conditions. Is that right, or am I confused?

    I recollect my first test drive in a new ’02 Jetta TDI; it was a strange experience. That drive-by-wire system was unusual. I’d put it in first gear, depress the “disconnected” throttle pedal, and . . . wait. But, then I could hear the little German gnomes and elves beneath the hood mumbling and grumbling, and finally saying, “Well, if you INSIST.” And then they finally bestirred themselves and began providing some locomotion. Very strange. ;-)

    And then, too, whenever the clutch was depressed, the cpu disconnected the throttle. I don’t know why they chose to do that, since it made it impossible to match revs on downshifts. By the time I got back to the dealership following a short drive, I was complaining more than the elves under the hood. ;-)

    However, that’s not to say it isn’t a fine car. Most owners seem to love their TDIs. I think it’s an acquired taste.

    I can imagine diesel owners being aggrieved these days; the other day I saw that diesel fuel was at $2.13/gallon, while regular grade gasoline was at $1.96. Diesel was always supposed to be cheaper. :-(
  • ruking1ruking1 Posts: 19,825
    "I don’t mean to get too far afield here, but I seem to recall that the cpu in the TDI will actually shut off fuel delivery under these conditions. Is that right, or am I confused?"

    Nope you are spot on on almost all of your perceptions. I'd go on about the Jetta a bit more, but am mindful this is a Honda Civic Owners: Problem and Solutions thread.
  • kauai215kauai215 Posts: 190
    You wrote:
    "Nope you are spot on on almost all of your perceptions."

    Not all? Hmm...

    Well, can you confirm the most important part for me, please? That would be the German gnomes and elves beneath the hood, of course.

    You hear them, too, don't you?

    <laughing!>
  • dalawdalaw Posts: 37
    I wouldnt do that either. Here are the reasons why:
    1.Damages can be done to the car, but it is not proven to be true yet.
    2.I think this is less fuel efficient because when the engine is at neutral, it requires fuel to keep it running, whereas leaving it in gear it uses very minimal fuel because the force of gravity is keeping the engine moving.
    3.The car is less stable if diconnected from the drivetrain.
    4.In case of emergency that you have to use power, you step on the gas and the car does not speed up, then that is not very safe.
  • blueiedgodblueiedgod Posts: 2,798
    2.I think this is less fuel efficient because when the engine is at neutral, it requires fuel to keep it running, whereas leaving it in gear it uses very minimal fuel because the force of gravity is keeping the engine moving

    Isn't that what I just said
    blueiedgod Dec 6, 2004 7:26am
  • tomtom Posts: 8
    Hi,

     

    I bought a new 2004 Honda Civic, and found there is a problem after 1000 mile. And hope someone can help.

    When driving at about 20-30mile/hr, I feel the wheel slip, like pulse (imagine like the clock needle jump), not smooth, no noise during continuous turing. It seems not happen at higher speed, cannot feel after parking the car and turn the wheel. My neighbour also feel this, but not the dealer (piss me off). Is it the steering pump problem? Thanks for your help and sharing.

     

    Have a nice day .
  • My Civic EX 01 headlights have some weird thing going on. When the lights are turned on, everything BUT the headlights function. But when I flip on the high beams, the high beams are fully functional. Basically this car is disabled for night driving, unless I want to blind everyone in front of me. I changed the fuses (both the 7.5 and 10) to no changes. Are there actually 2 bulbs on this car? Any other ideas on where to look for solutions?
  • gee35coupegee35coupe Posts: 3,475
    I think there was a recall for that. You need to take your car to the dealer.

    http://www.womanmotorist.com/index.php/news/main/2797/event=view
  • That's right. I remember taking that car for that repair. HMMM... unfortunately, I didn't like the treatment of that particular Honda Dealership. Thanks for the quick response.
  • lfmlfm Posts: 35
    I have a 1994 Honda Civic. My problem is that when the engine is cold, the car will crank, but will not start. I have had it towed to a Honda dealer, but since it started both days it was there, they did not find anything wrong. The next morning at home it would not start. I would appreciate any help.
  • blueiedgodblueiedgod Posts: 2,798
    Hi,

      

    I bought a new 2004 Honda Civic, and found there is a problem after 1000 mile. And hope someone can help.

    When driving at about 20-30mile/hr, I feel the wheel slip, like pulse (imagine like the clock needle jump), not smooth, no noise during continuous turing. It seems not happen at higher speed, cannot feel after parking the car and turn the wheel. My neighbour also feel this, but not the dealer (piss me off). Is it the steering pump problem? Thanks for your help and sharing.

      

    Have a nice day .


     

    Your Civic has speed sensitive power steering. Which means as you increase speed the power assist decreases. This is done to allow for easier parking and better highway steering responses. Maybe you have found the spot where the power steering is switching from high assist to low assist.
  • the malfunctioning indicator lamp has come on in my car and i looked in my manual and read what it said. I then looked it up on the internet and after doing some searching i found that it said the the ems is malfunctioning and i don't know what that is. if you could please let me know so that i can better understand what is happening with my car that would be greatly appreciated.
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