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Mazda Protegé

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Comments

  • vocusvocus Posts: 7,777
    I just took an interest in cars when I was 3 years old and she gave me my first Matchbox car. :) I was thinking about being an auto mechanic, but not sure if that's what I want to do forever (and hate the idea of being dirty all the time too). My mom wanted to be a race car driver when she was in her 20s, but never made it.
  • mazdafunmazdafun Posts: 2,329
    Cross-drilling of brake rotors allows more air circulation, thereby cooling down the rotors more quickly. However, "vented" rotors means the rotor disk is actually two plates, between which air channels are incorporated (versus solid, which are made from one plate). Cross-drilling allows yet more air circulation.
  • maltbmaltb Posts: 3,572
    Actually cross drilling provides a place for the rapidly heated air to compress so that it doesn't lift against the pads. It's not really about cooling but rather providing a channel for the air to escape or be compressed.

    Venting is however for cooling rotors.
  • ashutoshsmashutoshsm Posts: 1,007
    Seems like it would reduce the effective surface area available for the drums or brake pads to rub against - wouldn't/mightn't that reduce braking efficiency?
  • maltbmaltb Posts: 3,572
    that's physics 101.

    Follow me here...
    pressure is measured in lbs/sq. in.

    If you reduce the surface area you increase the pressure proportionately. Being that the pad size never changes, the only effect will be on the longevity of the rotor which is negligible. Cross drilling only increases the effectiveness of the pad/rotor contact.
  • SporinSporin Posts: 1,066
    And, if you want to get even more nit=pickey-technical.. it reduces unsprung weight.

    By the teensiest amount, but every ounce counts. :-)
  • maltbmaltb Posts: 3,572
  • fowler3fowler3 Posts: 1,919
    grooves in rotors, what causes that? I have seen quite a few rotors with grooves in them.

    Fowler3
  • So vocus, what does your mom think of the protege???
  • dinu01dinu01 Posts: 2,586
    As far as I know I wish I had 4-wheel disc brakes instead of 2 discs and 2 drums... Didn't get the ABS ($1000 more?).

    Question: Are cross-drilled rotors worth the $$$ over regular rotors (price-vs-performance-vs-longevity)? What do you guys think? What about ventilated (the ones where 2 plates form the rotor) ones, like they have it on Porsches?

    In other news, we're in mid-December and you can see grass in T.O. and the odd patch of melted snow from last week. Feels like a California winter so far. Fairly warm too (meaning I didn't get frostbite yet or "glued" my tongue on my jacket's zipper :) )

    Cheers!~
    Dinu
  • vocusvocus Posts: 7,777
    My mother passed away in January 2001, so she never got to ride in the ES (bought it February) or my Jetta. She liked my 1999 DX though, even though it was a "stripper" by her standards. :) She drove it a couple times, and said it reminded her of the zippy cars she started out driving when she was my age. She never even complained about the power in the DX, which I found unusual.
  • mazdafunmazdafun Posts: 2,329
    You probably wouldn't notice the difference in every-day driving. You'd notice it during racing or long down-hills when you're on your brakes a lot.

    Grooves that form are due to uneven wear. It happens since the same arc on the pad travels on the same arc on the rotor. A small amount is OK. Too much can cause squeal, vibration, generally poorer braking.

    Grooves machined into the surfaces are ostensibly to help clear air from between the pads and rotors. I don't think at most NA speed limits they do squat, since I don't think a significant air cushion forms between the pads and rotors.

    Maltb is correct in that cross-drilled holes can relieve this air pad. I still think they play more of a role in cooling the rotors than in removing compressed air. Maybe at 65+mph, they start to make a difference in brake effectiveness.

    I think the stock rotors in front are the ventilated type. Unless you race or live in tall, hilly terrain, cross-drilled rotors won't make a noticeable difference from ventilated discs. Of course, they look very cool when seen through alloy wheels. :)
  • dinu01dinu01 Posts: 2,586
    Thanx for clearing up any questions I had.

    Fowler: Chat in "on" for tonight?

    Dinu
  • the_big_hthe_big_h Posts: 1,583
    indeed on tonight, 9ET/6PT
  • fowler3fowler3 Posts: 1,919
    tonight for chat! Bring your questions and answers and general car topics and join us for a fun hour!

    The fastest hour in the West.

    fowler3
  • dinu01dinu01 Posts: 2,586
    until CHAT time baby! Dinu will calm down now and wait until 9pm :):)
  • if the transmission fails not allowing to GO. These cars have had chronic tranny problems!! The 626 is even worse! I have had 4 trannys in mine and it has only 70k. As far as I am concerned Mazda can their crap and leave the country (but leave Ford the Miata). The customer service line for this company is a joke. What's this crap about I can't talk to a supervisor they have to call me back?? Every time I call the supervisor is "busy" and will have to call me back. Buh-Bye mazda...I had an '86 Buick Centrury with a god awful 2.2L 4-cyl that had more zoom-zoom!!!
  • newcar31newcar31 Posts: 3,711
    "Leave Ford the Miata" Yeah right. Was that a joke? "These cars have had chronic tranny problems" Get your facts straight. It's the automatic (a Ford design) 4 cyl 626 that has had chronic tranny problems, not the Proteges. '86 Buick Centurys didn't have 2.2L engines, if it was a 4 cyl, it was a 2.5L.
  • I never said it wasn't the automatic tranny. Re-read my post. As for the 2.2 that was a slip, I meant 2.5. And get your facts strait...the `99 model year for the protege had the same tranny problems as the 626 did and still does!!! While we're at it...lets mention the chronic oil pump failures in the MPV which is causing premature engine failure. Ford designs yes...but you don't see Contours/Mysiques/Cougars/Focus/Escorts (with exception of the 3-spd offered a while back)with these types of problems with the frequency of the Mazdas. Oh wait...that's right, the Tribute has Tranny problems for the ´01 model year. Before you thrash my current offering do your research and get your facts strait. As for the Miata being a Ford...Ford can certainly as some flair to it with a slight redesign and a bit more power. It would fit perfectly beneath the Mustang and above the much contemplated convertible Focus.
  • SporinSporin Posts: 1,066
    Anecdotal evidence means nothing. Feel free to post statistical data. I'm not doubting you, but you need to quaote a source with real data.

    EVERY consumer magazine I have read has the Protege for the last few years as being a best buy and highly recommended with very few quality issues. That's one of the reasons I bought it. :-)
  • the_big_hthe_big_h Posts: 1,583
    looks like we have a little troll problem here, host, can you take care of this please?
  • Would it help if I said my friend works for Mazda at the headquarters in Irvine, Ca. and also has a Protege? If it's hardcore written facts you want I can certainly provide with the right amount of research time. I might be able to convince him to forward the internal office emails to me...or at least print them out so we can scan them on to here. I doubt anyone there would know who did it. Hell last year I posted his supervisors number on this board. He got pretty pissed at me as she complained and accused people of giving out her ext. number. But hey, I got tired of hearing the same thing from those people about my car over and over...I didn't want to go through him since he is a friend...so I did what I had to do :)
  • I will say though, while I hate the company and most of its products...the new protege mp3 looks cool...it just needs something...maybe the miller cycle engine to wedge into it...perhaps in place of the back seat like the SHO-gun of years back!
  • I am sorry to hear you have had such a lousy experience with Mazdas. Everymake has a bad apple every now and then, and it sounds like you may have received one. I have had the exact opposite experience. My Protege was so good, I purchased a Millenia. My dealer experience has been as good as any I have ever had (including battling an ongoing sunroof problem on my Millenia). Sounds like you have been afflicted on all fronts with a bad apple of a car and poor service to boot. I can't blame you for being unhappy, but most of the folks in this forum have had pretty good luck with their cars, so I doubt you will find much sympathy if you continue your rant. We got your point. Let's move on.
  • That's great you are satisfied. I too am satisfied with my current offering from Nissan. I haven't had a single problem in the 110k miles I have owned (other than routine Maint. & wear outs.) My BMW though has had some issues but only two. But my whole point is that the company produces shoddy products at best. You point it out in your own remarks saying that while you are happy on all fronts with your Mazda you have ongoing sunroof problems.
  • the_big_hthe_big_h Posts: 1,583
    where is the engine block heater located? Supposedly it's installed on my car as a dealer add-on, but I never bother to find it or use it.

    speaking of which, what does it do and how do I use it?
  • Yes, I am sure nobody has ever had a problem with a Nissan vehicle. So, using your logic...

    Zero personal problems with Nissan = Good Car

    Multiple problems with Mazda = Bad Car

    Hmmm, so since my Millenia has had one problem, and your BMW has two, that must mean that the BMW reliability is twice as bad as the Mazda, right? Of course it isn't. My point is that your personal experiences are coloring your objectivity here...A LOT!

    P.S. This isn't a slam on Nissans or BMW
  • vocusvocus Posts: 7,777
    Nissan is not necessarily a good car. I know someone with a 1997 Sentra with about 100K on it, and it's been in the shop several times for computer problems (check engine), and the airbag light.
  • dinu01dinu01 Posts: 2,586
    As Protegenic points out, most of us here have had no problems with their PROs. I can also tell you that every manufacturer has BAD products, domestics and imports included. The reason I bought a PRO is that for 2001 it was still made in Japan unlike most other offerings in this price range. I personally have a bias against American cars (don't like the inferior reliability record, poor interior finish and handling - or lack of), so at about $20,000 CDN, the PRO was the obvious choice as a smart shopper.

    As far as the tranny issue goes, I hope it will hold well for a few yrs as I'm planning to keep the car for about at least 7 yrs. for your 626: It's NOT a Mazda tranny, but one made by the Recall Motor Company! You knew this when you bought it, so what;s the big deal?

    Now if you plan to bash our PROs for the next few days I can tell you that you won't find too many sharing your views, so good luck.

    Btw, I think the Mp3 is just fine the way it is. More hp is always good, but if you can drive a stick shift, you can get hp from any engine. In most countries on this planet, there aren't many V6s or 200+hp cars (see Europe, that I know for sure), and these cars still drive, b/c people can drive stick instead of auto. I'm not bashing the auto trannies as I have one, but just saying that asking for more than 140hp (if this is the sort of thing you were refering to) is not that relevant after all.

    Dinu
  • dinu01dinu01 Posts: 2,586
    "The customer service line for this company is a joke. What's this crap about I can't talk to a supervisor they have to call me back?? Every time I call the supervisor is "busy" and will have to call me back."

    I work in a call-ctr and I can tell you that this is the way we deal with "I wanna talk to a supervisor" requests. Most people think that talking to a supervisor will solve their problems. I can tell you that, unless it's an exceptional case where the company has scr*w*d up BIG time, what the supervisor will tell you is exactly what you would hear from the 1st person that takes your call.

    Also, b/c of people calling in like this, supervisors can't take your call at that moment. If they do call you within 24hrs, then the company has offered you good cust svc. If not, THEN you can b*tch and complain all you want.
  • chikoochikoo Posts: 3,008
    is your thinking OFFSET too!
    I am not able to understand your posts.
    Have I lost my ability to read or understand?
    I hope not.

    So would you be kind enought to elaborate on your experiences without giving out vague answers and prevent us the effort to "read between the lines" ?

    Thanks for your time.
  • dinu01dinu01 Posts: 2,586
    The engine block heater should help warm-up the engine before a cold start if you live in a cold climate (like Alaska or Canada - had to get a quick Canadian weather comment in there :) ). You should see an AC cord in the front of your engine, towards the front grille. You should get a timer and set it to go "on" 2 hrs before you plan to start your car on cold winter days (below -5C should be ok) so you don't put too much strain on your battery.

    I think this is it. Now if you live in thwe South States, I doubt you have a use for it. Which brings me to my next question: so where do you live?

    Dinu
    (It's sunny today in T.O.!)
  • the_big_hthe_big_h Posts: 1,583
    I live in the Northern Virginia, this morning it was a chilly 40F!!!!

    Yes I've been spoiled by the 60-ish weather we've had in the past few weeks.

    I'll look to see if indeed my car's been equipped with a block heater, if not the dealer's got some explaining to do... thanks for the help :)
  • vocusvocus Posts: 7,777
    The cars here don't come standard with an engine block heater, unless you paid for it extra. Look in your owner's manual about it, there is something about it if I remember correctly. They are usually standard in Canada because it's so cold, but not in the US. I don't get it either.
  • vocusvocus Posts: 7,777
    I had 2 Gen3 Proteges (a 1999 and a 2001, both engines too) and never had problems with either one. I will admit, the 1999 DX I had used to shift a little funny when passing. It would pause for a moment between shifts. The dealer never found a problem with the car, and I traded it in with 37,364 on it with nary a problem but that and the CD player that liked to hold my CDs hostage. I took the DX to the dealer once for each problem, and it wasn't found either time, so I never went back to them. And no problem with the car. Just dealt with the two things.

    The 2001 was a little bit more problematic. The radio died, it refused to start one on me (at less than 10K miles!), the driver's power window wouldn't go down, and the brake rotors were warped (my fault, from washing too soon after parking it). So every car is different.

    Customer service: It depends on the dealership you go to. I have had great customer service before from Mazda, and poor customer service. The dealer where I bought the 2001 was great, but the one near my work (about 50 miles south of where I bought the 2001) sucked. I will say, however, that I get treated better with VW customer service than Mazda (hard to believe, eh?). They gave me a free loaner when I complained (twice!) and also wash and clean the car every time you leave it for service.
  • the_big_hthe_big_h Posts: 1,583
    as a dealer installed option, I believe that's what's listed on the window sticker. I will double check to make sure before I go to the dealer complainin' about not getting what I bought.

    And yes I know having an engine block heater in my area is totally irrelevant, but what the heck
  • protege_fanprotege_fan Posts: 2,405
    What strain on the battery from the block heater? The block heater plugs directly to the cord to the outlet. How is this straining the battery? Very curious, as I plug mine in all night almost every night as we've been fairly cold here in Calgary.

    PF
  • alternatoralternator IndianaPosts: 629
    My new 2002 Protege LX came with Bridgestone Potenza RE92 P195/55R15 84V tires. The treadwear grade is 160 (the lowest number I've ever seen), traction A, temperature A. The TireRack.com web site only lists a Potenza tire of this size as having a treadwear grade of 260! And furthermore, practically every customer comment (on this model tire, at this web site) claims the tire to be absolute junk, and having terrible rain and snow driveability!

    Can anyone having the same tires please tell me your experiences? And why would Mazda want to sully their fine reputation by equipping new Proteges with such tires (if the bad notices are anywhere near to the truth)?

    Another matter: Why on earth does the Owner's Manual say "Because you need a special tool to retighten the filter, an Authorized Mazda Dealer should do the work"? I haven't gone under the car yet, but I always change my own filters and if I can get the old filter off surely I can retighten the new filter?

    Happy Holidays to all Protege owners!!!
  • dinu01dinu01 Posts: 2,586
    What I meant to say is that we use block heaters to prevent strain on the battery on a cold start. Never meant to say it damages the battery. Does that make sense? Maybe I didn't phrase it properly...

    And no they are not standard in Canada.

    Alternator: The Poortenzas are not the greatest tires you will have, that's for sure. I did drive with them in the snow and they are ok. I initially wanted to have 4 separate snow tires for winter, but after a few cms (5-7 cms.) in Toronto last week, I changed my mind. The Potenzas LOOK LIKE they aren't decent tires, but I think they are ok in the snow. If you look ahead and anticipate other people coming into your path, there shouldn't be any problems. Also, use D2 if going below 40km/h (25mph???) as the engine brake will stop you without touching the brakes. If you have a 5 spd, then downshift. You can also have OD on, then to slow you down, turn it off so you have the "OD off" indicator on. This revs the engine, which in turn slows you down. Try it at different speeds and you'll see.

    In the rain, they're not great if you need to make an emergency stop, say on the highway. So always look for an escape route if you have to slam on the brakes b/c it will take time. As long as you keep a fair distance and SCAN THE ROAD, all should be good.

    Dinu
  • protege_fanprotege_fan Posts: 2,405
    Whew...maybe I just mis-read it. At any rate, it's not a problem then.

    Block heaters are NOT standard in Canada, but the dealers here in Calgary (and probably many other cold places) install them immediately upon receiving the car because people are going to want them. However, there are many places in Canada where temperatures do not hit low extremes, and block heaters are not required.

    The potenzas have perfomred well in the snow thus far. We've had some really nasty days and I've had no trouble (knock on wood) yet. I will use them this winter, but next year, I know that I will want/need a dedicated set of winter tires.

    PF
  • maltbmaltb Posts: 3,572
    I would say that in general the most jaded individuals work on the hot-line. Face it, all they hear about are problems. So you have 20 people supporting hundreds of of thousands of owners.

    In a previous life I did warranty claim processing and you quickly develop opinions of certain vehicles. The danger there is that you aren't always familiar with how many of those vehicles are on the road.

    And a note to my buddy Offset:
    If you think a CR rep has access to internal documents you are way too naive. No company is that stupid. They basically get scripted responses to common issues.
  • ashutoshsmashutoshsm Posts: 1,007
    (I posted this in the Acc. and Mods board, but don't know how often people visit that, and was hoping to get a reply soon to install this over the weekend ...)

    I bought myself a switch because mine seems to have shorted out. I bought it a day before I left on my road trip from Utah to the east coast, so didn't have the time to install it then.

    Its much more humid here, and I think I should instll it soon. I received a quote which includes over an hour of labour - my question is- how difficult is it to instal it? Does the dash need to be dismantled? Can I just yank out the old switch and puch this in? (There are no wiring connections, just plug-in type contacts)

    For those that have/had an older Protege, this switch is in the middle of the dash unit, and is about 0.75 in wide by 1.5 in high.
  • ashutoshsmashutoshsm Posts: 1,007
    I posted this in the Acc. and Mods board, but don't know how often people visit that, so ...)

    Available? If so where?

    Any good? I have high profile 175-70 13 inch wheels, I might upgrade those too/instead. Although I have so much tread life still left on the Michelin X-Ones (13K covered, rated for 70K or 75K!), it would be a pity to have to trash them! And on the East Coast, there's no point (or space in my apartment) to store these to use as winter tires.

    Any tire/wheel combo upgrade recommendations? Size, tire type (all-season, performance etc) (design too!). Virginians - how much does it snow here? It hasn't snowed once yet, but seems to rain a lot!

    Is it easy to install the strut bar/brace? I don't have a cruise control unit in my car, I remember someone (speedyPT) had to cut away a part of that to make his brace fit.
  • vocusvocus Posts: 7,777
    I wouldn't waste the tires either. It really doesn't snow that much here in Md. to have snow tires either, I don't think. The strut bar is a good idea I think. You could wait for Pete to reply to your message though about installation. I don't think anyone else out there has put one on.
  • the_big_hthe_big_h Posts: 1,583
    the constant wet weather that we got last week was just an abberation, most of the time during winter it's just dry and cold.

    There's probably around 2-3 'major' snowstorms per year in N. Va., and to us, a 'major' storm would be anything above 1" of accumulation. So I would say it snows very little here, though it does rain quite a bit during winter, but not for a whole week like last week (or was it the week before that?).

    I doubt you'll need snow tires.
  • newcar31newcar31 Posts: 3,711
    You don't need a special tool to get the filter on and off. It will be really tight the first time you change it, but after that it should be easy. There is nothing different about the Protege's oil filter that would require you to use a special tool. The owner's manual is B.S.
  • I just think they want to get you in the dealer's service department since that is where the dealers make their money!
  • fowler3fowler3 Posts: 1,919
    new headgasket, if you know what I mean. ;)

    When they are good --they are VERY VERY GOOD.
    When they are bad, they are VERY VERY BAD.

    Just wanted to wish everyone a very very HAPPY HOLIDAY and hope you drive safely.

    fowler3
  • newcar31newcar31 Posts: 3,711
    Exactly. That's why it's B.S. You don't need a special tool, and you don't need to take it to the dealer. As a matter of fact, you'd be better off doing it yourself because you'll save money, and you'll know the job is done right.
  • alternatoralternator IndianaPosts: 629
    Thanks to all who commented on oil filter replacement. I could have waited till my first oil change, but I am brand new to this board thing so I thought I'd give it a shot!

    Still, about those Potenza tires: Do all of these furnished as OEM by Mazda have a lowly 160 treadwear grade? And also a "V" rating, which I understand means the tire is made to perform properly up to 140 mph!! What sort of silliness is that?
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