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Welcome, Toyota Tundra

rover4rover4 Member Posts: 2
edited March 2014 in Toyota
I own a Land Cruiser, but if the new Tundra is at
least close to what they say it is , I am ready for
a switch. I need a truck, my lease expires next
fall - perfect timing.
Nothing against the current heavyhitters - Ford,
Dodge and GMC/Chevy - must be great trucks. Though,
judging by constant whining of its owners on
Edmund's - not that great. Well, nothing is
perfect...
I hope it will be different with Tundra (I don't
like the name though). This is Toyota and the name
speaks for itself. At least that's what my
experience with 3 Toyotas tells me and that's the
major difference between Toyota and the rest of the
trucking world.
Reliability and toughness. That's what you want
from your truck, that's what you get here. I was on
a hunting safari last year in South Africa. Tough,
tough country. Only the strongest survive - man,
animal, truck. My outfitter told me after I asked,
that he bought four F-150 several years ago for his
operation, but they lasted less than one season.
Sold what was left to Arabs in Johannesburg. Toyota
survives, same as Nissan and Rover. "Build Ford
Tough..."
You can argue about it, but that's reality.
Anyway, we live in America and the reality for our
trucks is 5 miles on something other than
Interstate 40 - and we call it "off-road" and are
very happy that the truck is still running. And the
"power" - well, you see the difference between 5.4
and 5.7 - at a gas pump.
I welcome new Toyota to the truck family and I
hope Ford and Chevy guys will realize that every
new Toyota is a blessing for them - it makes Ford,
GM and Chrysler work harder to achieve same
standard of quality, so their fans whine less and
enjoy their trucks more.
«13456712

Comments

  • hindsitehindsite Member Posts: 590
    Anyway I would love to see more posts concerning the Tundra specifically. This topic is not the domestics vs Tundra.
  • rshollandrsholland Member Posts: 19,788
    Saw the Tundra at the Washington DC Auto Show last weekend. The rear seat area on their Access Cab appears "deeper" than the rear seating area of the F-150 Super Cab.

    Speaking of the F-150, I'm a bit disappointed at just how much the new Toyota was influenced by Ford. Many of the design details look like they were designed in Dearborn. The dash is a combination of F-Series with the center module's black oval shape (heating, radio, etc) coming almost straight from the Taurus. Even the locking rear tailgate latch looks like it was lifted right off an F-150.

    I'm sure it will be a great truck. Toyotas always make a good product. I just wish they could be a bit more innovative when it comes to styling. It will be interesting to see how "truckers" will react to it.

    Frankly, I think it will make a great personal-use vehicle. It's not too large, has 4 doors, has a decent size rear seating with 60/40 split rear seats that include a center armrest and headrests, will carry almost a ton payload, and I'm sure will be very reliable. It certainly has a great new V8.

    Bob
  • rover4rover4 Member Posts: 2
    Bob:
    I totally agree with you that Toyota makes great but boring cars and trucks. Great in performance, but boring to look at. But, perhaps, everything that's perfect is usually boring (to some extend).
    And again I agree with the definition "personal-use vehicle" - I think that't where we are going to in trucks: not load-haulers anymore, but [non-permissible content removed]-haulers. Just look at the new Blackwood. So soon we gonna be discussing not the advantage of diesel over gas, but what kind of leather is cool this season.
  • quadrunner500quadrunner500 Member Posts: 2,721
    That's a lot of praise for a truck not yet here, and when it does arrive, remember it is not a full size truck you can compare to F150's. It is closer in size to Dakota. I think the AM Hummer is a tougher SUV than either the Range Rover, Land Cruiser or Nissan.
  • rshollandrsholland Member Posts: 19,788
    My comments are base on what I saw and Toyota's track record.

    You're right, it is closer in size to the Dakota than it is to the F-150. It appears to be just a bit longer (not wider) than the current T-100.

    In terms of "work capability", which is a big consideration for full-size 1/2 tons, the Toyota should beat or closely match the payload/towing capabilities of GM, Ford or Dodge. The current T-100 4x4's payload rating exceeds that of Ford's F-150 4x4. I would think the Tundra's payload would exceed that of the model it replaces.

    Bob
  • quadrunner500quadrunner500 Member Posts: 2,721
    It doesn't beat the towing of the 1/2 ton Ext. Cab Silverado/Sierra, with 8200 lb max towing versus 7200 for Tundra, but the payload is close, at 2000 lb for Tundra, 1965 for Silverado/Sierra. I think the true strength of the Tundra will be it's ride quality and strong acceleration since that 4.7 engine is very smooth in Lexus products, but with overhead cam complexity, valve lash adjustments will add expense to your maintenance routine and fuel economy will not be better. Also, the seat as pictured looks a little thin and unsupportive to me.
  • rshollandrsholland Member Posts: 19,788
    My point is... Toyota is finally a serious player in the full-size 1/2 ton market. It may not be the best at any one thing, but it is very good at what most people want. And, if history is any indicator, it will probably be the most reliable 1/2 ton on the market.

    I may be wrong, but I believe it has hydraulic valves, which do not need adjustment. I also think it has a timing chain as opposed to a timing belt.

    As to gas mileage... we'll see. Just because it is an OHC engine, doesn't necessarily mean high rpms/low mileage. Their 3.4 OHC V6 proves that.

    Bob
  • quadrunner500quadrunner500 Member Posts: 2,721
    I don't mean to understate what Toyota has done, but I have to disagree that they are a serious competitor in full size 1/2 ton, for the reason that they are only 7/8 scale, and for the reason that a Silverado/GMC 3/4 ton truck still has the same dimensions as the 1/2 ton version. But there is no doubt that the 4.7L Tundra engine is a gem.
  • rshollandrsholland Member Posts: 19,788
    You're, in some ways, comparing apples to oranges.

    1. Were talking 1/2 ton models, not 1/2 ton "&" 3/4 ton models.

    2. Granted, Toyota does not (yet) offer the range of model configurations that GM, Ford or Dodge offer; but, in the models that do directly compare, the Tundra is fully competitive.

    3. No, the Toyota is not as "wide" as the domestic 1/2 tons, but it can still fit a 48" panel between the wheel wells in the bed. To me, as a personal use vehicle (which is what most 1/2 tons are used for), the smaller size is a positive, not a negative.

    4. Toyota, like Mercedes with its ML-Class, offers the customer a different "flavor" of truck. Again, I see that as a positive, not a negative. The more "real" choices for the customer, the better.

    5. I don't see the "bigger-is-better trend" that the current domestic trucks are moving towards as necessarily better. I used to have an '87 F-150 4x4 regular cab long bed with a GVW of 6200 pounds and a payload rating of 2,200 pounds. Today's comparable F-150 is bigger, heavier, and... while it GVW may be the same or higher... it's payload rating is much less than that of my old F-150. I don't call that progress.

    Don't get me wrong, I would much rather a new F-150 than my old F-150. But, if I want to match the payload capacity of my old truck, I would have to move up to a F-250 with a GVW of 7,200 pounds in order to do that.

    Bob
  • quadrunner500quadrunner500 Member Posts: 2,721
    Well just what is 1/2 ton anyway? I agree we are talking apples and oranges. I said the Tundra is not full size because it measures smaller in most dimensions with the measuring tape, wheelbase, track, and bed dimensions. It is closer in size to the mid-size Dakota. That it has the same payload as the Silverado 1/2 ton is irrelevant because the 3/4 ton Silverado also has the exact same dimensions as the 1/2 ton Silverado, but with its stiffer springs and heavier axles, payload increases 50% over the 1/2 ton. So the question becomes, is it fair to say it is apples to apples when comparing payload of the Tundra vs full size 1/2 ton, and not fair when its Tundra vs full size 3/4 ton? Like I said, I don't want to understate what Toyota has done, but to say it is full size would be overstating it.
  • rshollandrsholland Member Posts: 19,788
    Perhaps I should have said a series 1500 GM or Dodge Truck, or an F-150, rather than 1/2 ton.

    The fact remains that the "domestic" trucks are put into (correctly or incorrectly) 3 classifications: 1/2 ton, 3/4 ton and 1 ton. These terms are outdated for sure, but most people still use them when they're discussing (and comparing) pickups. The Tundra is not meant to compete with a 3/4 or 1 ton pickup.

    If you look at most of the 1/2 tons on most dealers lot (GM, Dodge or Ford), you will find that most of them are short-bed extended cabs, and aimed at the personal use crowd. That's where the market is, and that's why the Tundra is so equipped. Who knows, in a few years, they will probably fill out and expand their model range.

    GM, Ford, Dodge and the media seem to think of it as a full-size truck.

    Bob
  • symerbeesymerbee Member Posts: 1
    Can anyone help me with a place to get info on the new Toyota Tundra? Haven't seen any advertising here in Canada, but have plenty of friends interested. I'd appreciate any contacts...thanks.
  • msorensomsorenso Member Posts: 5
    I found some good info and pictures, interior and exterior from msn carpoint from the na auto show
    from early january. just go to their site if you have it. info just starting to come out from dealers but nothing specific yet
  • tc14374tc14374 Member Posts: 22
    Symerbee, check out www.toyota.com and when you get to the site type tundra in the search window. They have a press release and a photo gallery with numerous interior and exterior photos to choose from.
  • msorensomsorenso Member Posts: 5
    I saw the tundra this weekend at the chicago auto show. unfortunately unable to get inside due to it was on a display. the truck looks just a bit bigger than the tacoma but smaller than the ford, dodge or chevy. the interior looks a lot like the
    tacoma. overall looks good but will need to wait until they get to the dealers.
  • tc14374tc14374 Member Posts: 22
    I talked to a local Toyota dealer this past weekend about the Tundra, he said that he is getting 20 of them in June and that he has deposits for all 20 already. He expects a loaded one with the v8 to go for 30-35k.
  • stanfordstanford Member Posts: 606
    That's a lot of money for the truck, especially when you consider that my truck was near the lower end of that range -- a '99 F350 crew cab DRW 4X4 with a V10, auto and leather seats. I'm not saying that they're the same at all, but I don't see anything in the Tundra that I didn't have to pay for, and I'm getting a lot that the Tundra didn't have. Seems to me they should be closer to the mid-$20s.
  • msorensomsorenso Member Posts: 5
    I agree with the mid twenties. I am interested but anything over thirty I am out. We will wait and see
  • quadrunner500quadrunner500 Member Posts: 2,721
    Well if the dealer has deposits for all twenty that far in advance, those initial buyers could be paying above MSRP, which would account for the discrepancy.
  • tc14374tc14374 Member Posts: 22
    The dealer pointed out that he his hearing that the truck is going to sell like hotcakes initially and he did say there would be no discounts when it first becomes available.
  • volfyvolfy Member Posts: 274
    I applaud Toyota's decision not to get into the Ford/GM/Dodge mine-is-bigger-than-yours rat race. As long as the Tundra can haul a 4x8 sheet flat, it's a "full-size" to me. A few lbs less payload or towing don't make much difference. I'd like to get something bigger than my Tacoma 4x2, but I'd still like to park it in my garage with room to spare. F-150/Sierra are just way too big.

    Now if only Toyota could keep the base price of the V6 version below $18,000...
  • stanfordstanford Member Posts: 606
    I think its a great size -- it would be nice if they'd call it a midsize if it is and compete with trucks like the Dakota. The T100 was a definate midsize, but the ads were claiming that the HD version of it was a 1 ton!
  • rshollandrsholland Member Posts: 19,788
    I agree that the Tundra, in many ways is probably more comparable to the Dakota, than to other traditional full-size pickups.

    The Dakota, however, can't fit 48" wide paneling between its wheelwells flat on the bed floor. The Tundra (and T-100) can. As Volfy mentioned: That has always been the key factor that has historically separated a full-size truck from a mid-size (or smaller) pickup.

    Bob
  • weslwesl Member Posts: 53
    Volfy:
    If Toyota did decide to get into the "mine is bigger than yours race" do you think they could pull it off? I have seen the Tundra at an auto show in Birmingham and the NAIAS in Detroit and came away thinking it is a scaled down F-150. I am sure Toyota will grab sales from Tacoma and Dakota owners, but I have a hard time imagining them braking any sales records. Remember, I can only base my judgements on their previous efforts. Heres hoping Toyota will one day see fit to offer a decent diesel engine in a pickup. Later, Wes.
  • volfyvolfy Member Posts: 274
    wesl,

    If by "pull it off" you mean make a F-150/Sierra sized truck just as good if not better than Ford/GM/Dodge, then the answer is a definite yes. But I agree that to convince enough of the traditional 1/2-ton-plus truck buyers to hang their cowboy hats in a Toyota will be no small feat.

    A great number of these full-size trucks are bought by contractors and tradespeople who are not the type to stop framing with 2x4s everytime somebody comes up with a new and better way to build a house.

    Toyota is smart not to mess with that traditional heavy duty work truck market. Instead, they are catering to the growing personal-use truck buyers. Much easier to sell a new truck to someone who hasn't been buying Ford/Chevy for the past 20 years.
  • rcnrcn Member Posts: 21
    Stanford:
    I don't remember a 1 ton version of the T100, but I wouldn't be surprised if there was one. Several months ago, I saw an older Toyota compact which had 1 ton printed on the back. And suddenly, I remembered that I had seen other small Toyotas with 1 ton on them in the past. I did a little research and found that 1 ton compacts were sold as recently as the mid to late 1980's. I guess they rode pretty rough but could haul a lot of weight in the back. I think they only came in a long bed version and many were used for conversion for small moving trucks and camper homes. I've seen some dual rear wheel compact Toyota trucks which I assume were the 1 ton models. If I'm not mistaken, the current Tacoma can be classified as a half ton based on hauling capacity.

    Of course, these trucks didn't/don't have the power for heavy towing or the larger beds, so the point is moot for most people.

    Anyone else remember the little 1 ton Toyota trucks?
  • stanfordstanford Member Posts: 606
    The thing is, any truck with a 2000lb payload capacity can call itself a 'one-ton' truck. That was what Toyota was doing with the T100. While this has some historical precedence, the term 'one-ton' has evolved to mean something entirely different.

    To put it in perspective, my current 'one-ton' Ford has a payload capacity of 4,750lbs -- they'd never advertise it as a '2 1/2 ton truck' though.
  • quadrunner500quadrunner500 Member Posts: 2,721
    Stanford is right, my 1/2 ton Silverado could be a one-ton truck if all it took was a 2000 pound payload to qualify.
  • RichRich Member Posts: 128
    If you wait a few months or so, I think that Toyota is going to discount the Tundra in a big way. As I recall Toyota is building a big US based plant. This plant's capacity is to be 100K units a year. If Toyota is selling 20K T-100s a year now, there is going to be more supply than demand for the Tundra. If it were me, I would give it to the fall of this year before buying. You may be able to save BIG $$$. It's Economics 101, the law of supply and demand.

    Rich
  • Toyota17Toyota17 Member Posts: 15
    FULL-SIZE TOYOTA TUNDRA PICKUP WILL COMBINE VALUE,

    Quality and Industry-Leading Features

    TORRANCE, Calif., March 10 /PRNewswire/ -- When it goes on sale in early June, the all-new 2000 model-year Toyota Tundra will enter the full-size pickup truck market with an impressive resume of value, quality and industry- leading features.

    The Tundra will be built exclusively at Toyota Motor Manufacturing, Indiana (TMMI), an all-new $1.2-billion facility located in Gibson County, near the city of Princeton. It will ride on an all-new chassis that will help set a full-size pickup benchmark for handling, ride comfort and interior noise isolation.

    Featuring the most sophisticated powerplant ever offered in a full-size pickup, Tundra's optional i-Force 245 horsepower 4.7-liter engine will be the first double-overhead cam, 32-valve V8 ever offered in the segment. Derived from the powerful engine used in the legendary Toyota Land Cruiser, it will provide a high level of smoothness and quietness. It also will be one of the first V8 engines in the segment to achieve an L.E.V. (low-emission vehicle) emissions classification from the EPA, and will achieve good fuel efficiency.

    Tundra will be available in three grades -- base, SR5 and Limited. It will be powered by either a V8 or V6 engine, including two- or four-wheel drive, two-door regular cab with an eight-foot bed or four-door Access Cab with a six and-a-half-foot bed.

    The new Access Cab features large double-doors and one of the most expansive entry areas in the segment. It also is the only four-door pickup to feature an exterior handle on each door providing easier operation from the outside than the commonly used door-jam mechanism.

    The Access Cab's 60/40 rear split-bench seat provides seating for three passengers, dual adjustable outboard headrests and a fold-down center armrest with cup holders. Valuables can be hidden out of sight in a storage compartment under the rear seat cushion or the cushion can be folded up to handle cargo, instead of passengers. On models equipped with a standard front bench seat, the Access Cab will accommodate six passengers -- three in the front and three in the rear.

    Standard equipment on Tundra will include driver- and passenger-side airbags (with passenger air bag cutoff switch), all-new sound systems, dual 12-volt power outlets, high solar energy-absorbing glass and driver- and passenger-side dual sun visors with pull-out extensions.

    In anticipation of Tundra's summer launch, Toyota has announced prices on the new full-size entry. Manufacturers Suggested Retail Prices (MSRP) will range from $14,995 for a base 4x2 model to $27,830 for a top-of-the-line Limited 4x4.

    The company said an SR5 4x2 Access Cab powered by the high-tech i-Force V8 will be priced at $22,250. The price includes 4-speed ECT automatic transmission, CFC-free air conditioning, ETR radio with cassette and four speakers, tachometer, cruise control and 16-inch styled steel wheels.

    A base-model 4x2 regular cab V6 with five-speed manual transmission will have a price of $14,995. The price includes cloth seats, cut-pile carpeting, AM/FM cassette, dual outside mirrors and P245/70 R16 tires. SOURCE Toyota Motor Sales USA, Inc.
  • quadrunner500quadrunner500 Member Posts: 2,721
    It's a Toyota. Have they fixed the head gaskets yet?
  • bonnie_rickbonnie_rick Member Posts: 115
    First Drive of the 1999 Toyota Tundra Pickup Truck, "The Full-Size Pickup Truck You Always Knew Toyota Could Build", by B. Grant Whitmore, coming soon to the www.edmunds.com front page.

    Bonnie Rick
    Town Hall Community Manager, edmunds.com
  • KatmanduKatmandu Member Posts: 24
    If The ford F150 and Dodge Ram were to have a child it would be the Tundra. It is full size for small people, but if you were 6'1" 225 lbs, you'd skip the Dakota sized toyota and buy a real truck. However, it is much better than that crappy T100.
  • pugsleypiepugsleypie Member Posts: 2
    Anyone have the exact size dimentions of the Tundra. Length, wheelbase.
  • artoarto Member Posts: 2
    is the extended cab really roomy?
  • rljohnsonrljohnson Member Posts: 1
    i have two t-100's 95 twd and a 98 4wd so i'm waiting for my local dealer to get his first tundra's in to try one out they realy look good and if they are built as good as my j code truck's there could be one in my drive way this month.
  • brucec35brucec35 Member Posts: 246
    The Tundra sounds like a pretty good design except:

    1. I find the styling pretty homely, mostly in the grill area. Maybe big tires and wheels would help the overall look...I'll have to see some when they hit the road first.

    2. I find the unavailbility of a reg. cab short bed version to be quite odd. A lot of people need trucks that can get in smaller areas(like garages) or just don't need the back seat, yet they don't want the workmanlike look of a long bed truck.

    3. I've owned 4 toyotas in my life. My last was a '91 4-runner that looked and ran like new at 100,000 miles, it's paint job was better than my 3 month old Dodge Ram's. But in my experience, the Toyota dealer network has bad business practices. Bait n' switches, adding on "extras" when you come in to do the paperwork, lowballing on price, gouging on repairs, etc, etc. That is a big negative for me. I'd be wary of having to deal with them again. At least the 3 dealers I've dealt with here.

    4. Cost. I shudder to think what Toyota will want for these trucks. Add in the "new hot vehicle" premium and I figure it will be a year or two before you will be able to find one at a decent price. I suspect all this first year's models will be loaded up to the hilt, since they will have limited capacity early on, and want to max out the profits per unit.
  • tundra_fantundra_fan Member Posts: 1
    Now that the competitive prices for the Tundra have been released, is anyone ready to buy?
  • alex17alex17 Member Posts: 35
    IF THOSE PRICES THAT ARE RELEASED ARE ACCURATE, THEN WHAT IS KEEPING THE TUNDRA FROM CANABALIZING THE TACOMA MARKET. A TOP OF THE LINE TACOMA LIMITED IS ABOUT $24,000. ONLY ABOUT 13% LESS THAN A LIMITED TUNDRA. I WOULD PAY THAT IN A HEARTBEAT TO GET THAT V8.

    TOYOTA MIGHT BE DOING THEIR TRIED AND TRUE METHOD OF BRINGING A PRODUCT OUT TO MARKET WITH VERY ATTRACTIVE PRICES AND AFTER THEN FIRST YEAR OF WINNING CUSTOMER SUPPORT FOR THEIR PRODUCT, THEY JACK PRICES UP TO THE STRATOSPHERE. LOOK AT LEXUS. EITHER WAY, THE TUNDRA WILL BE A FANTASTIC PRODUCT. BUT YOU DO PAY ALOT FOR THAT TOYOTA NAMEPLATE ON FRONT.

    AS FAR AS BETTER QUALITY THAN AMERICAN PRODUCT, I THINK MOST OF THAT IS PERCIEVED QUALITY.
    I WORK FOR A CONSTRUCTION COMPANY AND WE OWN ABOUT 100 COMPANY TRUCKS, ALL FORD. I WOULD BE GRACIOUS TO SAY THAT OIL CHANGES ARE DONE EVEN EVERY 10,000 MILES. ROUTINE MAINTENANCE IS ALMOST NON-EXISTANT. OUR TRUCKS ARE WORKING ON OUR JOB SITES EVERY DAY AND CAN NOT BE BROUGHT IN TO HAVE MAINTENANCE DONE. THEY IDLE FOR HOURS AT A TIME, SIT IN DUSTY, MUDDY CONDITIONS. WE HAVE BOTH GAS(80%) AND DIESEL(20%) ENGINES. WE NEVER HAVE PROBLEMS WITH OUR TRUCKS. MOST OF OUR TRUCKS HAVE 50,000+ MILES ON THEM AND NEARLY ONE FOURTH HAVE 100,000+ MILES ON THEM. NOTHING MAJOR TO COMPLAIN ABOUT. WE WILL CONTINUE TO BUY FROM FROM FORD UNTIL CHEVY OR DODGE OR TOYOTA OFFER US A LOWER PRICE. MY POINT BEING IF THESE "POOR QUALITY" AMERICAN TRUCKS LIKE FORD CAN STANDUP TO THE ABUSE THEY GET ON A CONSTRUCTION SITE, I THINK THEY CAN ALL MAKE GREAT, DEPENDABLE, SAFE, VEHICLES FOR YOUR FAMILY JUST AS WELL AS A TOYOTA OR NISSAN.
  • ladyblueladyblue Member Posts: 326
    alex17:

    Shhhhh....please turn off your caps lock, you're shouting.
  • Toyota17Toyota17 Member Posts: 15
    Earlier this year, AMCI, an internationally recognized automotive testing and evaluation firm, conducted a series of independent performance evaluations on all the top full-size pickups, including the new Toyota Tundra. And while some "domestic" truck fans might do a double take, we weren't surprised by the findings at all. In many of the most significant categories, Tundra models handily outperformed the competition. The Tundra accelerated, braked, and towed more than Chevrolet, Dodge, or Ford! (Go to http://www.toyota.com/vehicles/future/tundra/acceleration.html for more information.)
  • alex17alex17 Member Posts: 35
    sorry....
  • LohengrinLohengrin Member Posts: 84
    I don't know about all these comparison tests. You can use stastics to prove anything. All four companies use similar tests to show that their truck is best. If the extent of the test results is on that Toyota website, it doesn't show a whole lot. All three domestic trucks can be fitted with bigger V8's that accelerate faster and haul. Tundra can't. Also, what were the axle ratios on the tested trucks? Or transmitions? It never said that all the vehicles were equipped as equally as possible.
  • dayledayle Member Posts: 4
    Now that pricing is out on the Tundra, I can't wait to drive one. My first full sized truck is a
    97 Ford F150 XLT extended cab. This was my
    first domestic purchase since 1981. While the
    Ford has many nice features (which I hope to find on the Tundra), it has been back 10 times
    for recalls and malfunctions. I am ready to try
    Tundra for my 10th. new Toyota vehicle in 15
    years.
  • scape2scape2 Member Posts: 4,124
    Did you say you were a Toyota sales person?
  • rossenrossen Member Posts: 1
    Hi,

    I have been considering the XLE Sienna in Black.

    I have a 91 MPV now. Yes, it's also black! ;-)

    I need a van to haul my large and sometimes heavy equipment, recording gear about 25%, and people 75 % of the time.

    I am also the soccer coach for U-15 Classic girls team and travel with equipment and team.

    I like the way the Sienna handles and rides...although I find that my back hurts after 30 mins. of driving. I am seeking expert advice on this. My family member think their seats are superb.

    I have not seen a Tundra, and I am wondering if this might fit my needs better.

    I have had the opportunity to drive a new 98 MPV "All Sport" recently...and it kicked like a bucking bronko over small bumps. It is smaller than the Sienna, like my old 2 wheel drive MPV.

    Will the Tundra hold 4-5 passengers with great comfort? Does it ride smoother than a truck...or more like a large car?
  • LohengrinLohengrin Member Posts: 84
    Since Tundra is a truck, my guess is it does not ride smoother than a truck. My brother's Tacoma is all truck without any pretences of being "car-like" (which I think is a GOOD thing; I like how trucks ride). I think Tundra will ride like a big truck, even if it is a little smoother than competition. And I don't think ANY truck short of a crew cab will seat 4-5 people with "great comfort", depending on how great you want your comfort.
  • LohengrinLohengrin Member Posts: 84
    Don't know about your "facts". Sounds more like your opinion. Also seems like your comparison test was a little rigged in Toyota's favor if you had 8 versions of Tundra and only 2 of everything else. What are the facts? What eninges did the trucks have? What were the rear ends? Did they have limited slip? Was the Chevy a Z71? Were they extended cabs? Or even 4x4? I can't declare you correct if I don't know what you tested it against. I'd be a whole lot more impressed if your loaded up Tundra out performed a F-150 Lariat with a 5.4L engine, 4X4 Off-Road package than XL with a 4.6L.
  • scape2scape2 Member Posts: 4,124
    The facts are: Ford/Dodge/GM offer more options, engines, drive trains, suspensions, doors, packages.... should I go on?
  • mackabeemackabee Member Posts: 4,709
    Yes I am a Toyota salesperson, yes ford may have more options, for now anyway vince8.

    Lohengrin, there were 4 2wd v8 Tundras and 4 4WD V8 Tundras. 2 of each competitors trucks both 2wd and 4wd extended cabs. And nothing was "rigged" the reason we had more Tundras is that it was an event for Toyota salespeople (which some own Ford, Chevy, and Dodge trucks by the way) and everyone was given a chance to drive the Tundra at least once. Now if you don't like my opinion or the "facts" that's your prerogative. You'll see the actual tests by Motor Trend, Road and Track, and Car and Driver soon.
This discussion has been closed.