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Toyota Echo

12357115

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    rajmoranrajmoran Member Posts: 46
    I just received the recall notice for the brake assist. I live in Virginia so I guess this won't be a problem for me.

    I'm averaging 35 mpg in stop and go commuting.

    I was hearing a strange noise from the direction of the right front wheel well, especially in left turns. I was worried that I might be having to make a warranty claim. I had a friend steer the car in the parking lot and from the outside it sounded like it was coming from the tire. My wife suggested I have the tires rotated, so I did. The noise is gone. I guess it's important to have that done regularly, but I'm so bad about it (my car has 17,000 miles on it, first time tire rotation). It seems especially important on cars (like the ECHO) with small narrow tires. Anyway, lesson learned.

    I hope everyone is as pleased with the ECHO as I am.
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    danny28danny28 Member Posts: 158
    The closest opportunity right now seems to be January. We may visit some friends in Florida so you guessed right about the "pit stop" in KC.

    Let's see. That gives you KC folks only 2 months to get your Echo club organized. Since you (Steve) seem to enjoy the casinos, maybe that's a good place to hold the first "meetin".
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    danny28danny28 Member Posts: 158
    Thx for the tire rotation advise. I'm starting to think about winter (snow) tires. Any experience there ?

    By the way, I just had a look at your profile. What a cool photo ! Who says the Echo is JUST an economy car ? Even bike racers drive 'em.
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    mong1mong1 Member Posts: 32
    Well, asking for $13,500 for your specification is kind of too low. But hey, that could be a good start, add some slowly and you should be at the right TMV.

    Anyway, in my case, I believe they're going to offer me the Demo Gray echo for the same price as I order from the factory, because we have signed the deal, the amount is written in the contract.

    In case you don't know, I have to special order my Seafoam Blue Echo from the factory. I called the dealer, but this time, instead of talking to the sale lady, I talked to the manager. The manager is the one who place the order for me. I asked the manager to check with the computer, and he returned and told me that it takes 60 days. I asked him if this is a garuanteed time and he said no, but he promised he will check it in a weekly basis and if there is any change he will inform me. 60 days is not that bad compare with what I was first told (120 days!).

    So, echoluvrst, 60 days sound reasonable... I guess. I'm expecting to get my Echo at the end of Jan 2001(give them 90 days).

    I wish I can have the remote key lock feature as well, but I don't know how much it cost. Also, does anyone know how much it cost to add the security feature, like alarm etc? A friend of my just got his 6 speakers and cd car stereo system, two weeks later the whole thing was gone becuase someone broke into his car and stole everything.... this sound very scary (he is not driving an Echo by the way). He is not living in my area but it would be great to have some sort of security system, it's my first new car and I don't want bad thing to happen to him!!!
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    rajmoranrajmoran Member Posts: 46
    Thanks for the compliment on the picture.

    As for the snow tires, no I don't have any personal experience with use of special snow tires for the ECHO. We get maybe one or two snowstorms a year in Virginia and they usually don't amount to much in the way of accumulation. I found the regular tires to be more than adequate in the one good storm we had last year. Canada might be a different story though :). Good luck.
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    danny28danny28 Member Posts: 158
    I installed a Radio Shack security system on my old F150. It only cast $69.95 CDN, that's about 50 bucks US. I was really pleased about how simple the installation was. Besides screwing the main unit to the inner fender under the hood, the only connection I had to make was one wire to the +12V battery terminal. The Wire supplied with the unit had an in-line fuse holder on it so it didn't even have to be a fused connection point.

    The unit was sensitive to both door and hood openings because it monitored the +12V line and detected the slightest "glitch" on that line caused by anything electrical coming on in the vehicle including any courtesy lamps like the interior lamp or the under hood lamp.

    It was also sensitive to any mechanical vibration on the vehicle. I guess it has one or more accelerometers inside. You could adjust it's sensitivity by using the wireless remote to program it. I found it very easy to use and it worked really . IE no false alarms etc.


    But I think the 2 best features were;
    1) a little flashing red LED you could mount under the dash to show that it was armed, and
    2) 2 little 1"x1" understated black labels that I put on each of the rear side windows which said something like "Security System Protected".

    I think that these last 2 items which form the psychological protection, are the most useful because the deter theft prior to any breakin attempt, rather than after the attempt. The problem with the "after the fact" sirens, horns, and flashing lights is that they only come into play after the thief has committed himself to the theft. And by that time, they generally proceed to complete the theft, or at least do a lot of damage trying.

    I hope this helps,
    Danny
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    tickbittytickbitty Member Posts: 250
    cut it out with the political crap. This isn't the place. This guy is posting on all the boards.
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    krakatokrakato Member Posts: 30
    I just got my Dec Consumer Reports and it had an
    article on high efficiency hybrid-fuel vehicles:
    Honda Insight, Toyota Prius, Volkswagon Golf/Jetta
    (diesel) . . . and our ECHO!! Pretty classy
    company! The Echo got a good review and a
    "Recommended" checkmark. Don't have the issue with me so I can't quote from it, but I will later on if nobody else does.
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    danny28danny28 Member Posts: 158
    anyone who wishes to comment on this topic can do so at http://townhall.edmunds.com/cgi-bin/townhall/help.
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    danny28danny28 Member Posts: 158
    I share your interest in the new hybrids. I couldn't justify the extra expense and complexity the last go round so I bought an echo as well. I'm really impressed with the city mileage that the new hybrids get, but am pleased that the echo seems to do almost as well on the highway.

    I'll look forward to more information from the Consumer Reports. Thanks for telling us about it.
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    krakatokrakato Member Posts: 30
    I agree about the extra expense and complexity of the Prius (which looks to me to be the best hybrid). I love my ECHO -- maybe someday I'll move to a Prius or hybrid, but for now the ECHO is great. I was really tickled that Consumer Reports chose to review it with the two hybrids and a diesel. It was the only "conventional car" they reviewed in the article, and it stood up well in their comparison.
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    vocusvocus Member Posts: 7,777
    I test drove a Toyota Prius when by best friend's little sister bought her Echo. They have specialists at the dealership that are authorized to sell the Prius. It was very quiet, but not very powerful. Of course, I didn't expect it to be. Also, it was weird to have the engine cut off when idling. That would take getting used to. One thing I HATED about the car, and the reason I wouldn't have one, is the braking system. When you step on the brake, it activates the generator thing. Well, when you initially push on the brakes, nothing appears to happen even though you are pressing fairly hard. The brakes then get stronger and stronger and it's hard to make a smooth stop with them. Also, if I wasn't used to the car and drove it in traffic, I would have probably rear-ended someone. I found this to be very disconcerting and the reason I would not buy the vehicle. Too bad, because it was pretty nifty.
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    machodude23machodude23 Member Posts: 2
    The first time I saw the TOYOTA ECHO was last sunday the 5th of November and Immediately fell in love with the looks of the car. Its a sleek city car. But just to make sure, that the looks aren't deceptive, I looked at the technical specifications, and was equally satisfied with them. Aftersome time I thought that I need to do some research on this and other cars as well. But none of them has impressed me so much as the ECHO has.

    I thought that before I finalise the deal, let me check up the recommendations of Other people as well. So I just hooked on to this site. Got some good and bad responses. well, the website says that echo doesn't have any side airbags, and No Anti lock braking system shipped in at this time. I just wanted to know if anybody is having some experience of driving ECHO in the snow/cold countries. And how was the experience? Are the brakes reliable enough? The details of safety measures and crash test etc is alright, but why take chances. I just wanted a car with safe and reliable braking system.

    1> I mean is the AntiLock Braking system absolutely necessary for the ECHO in cold countries. I am staying in North of Massachussets.

    2> Somebody was mentioning about the crosswinds. And does it get difficult to handle the ECHO during cross winds.

    3> Also somebody said that it creates a rumbling sound at high speeds. Speeds above 80-90 mph. Is that true. I am gonna go for the two door coupe because of its sportier looks and economical prices.

    LET ME KNOW IF MY INSTINCTS ARE RIGHT.

    HELP ME PLEASE !!
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    tickbittytickbitty Member Posts: 250
    I don't know enough about them and I can't afford one, but I'm glad somebody's actually trying to make them viable. I saw a honda Insight recently and it sure is cool looking, even from a distance you can tell it is out of the ordinary. I love the fender skirts (or whatever you call them.)
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    echoluvrstecholuvrst Member Posts: 111
    I really do not think it is fair for the dealership to expect you to pay the same amount of money. The Echo you contracted for is a factory fresh car while the gray one you think you may have to end up settling for is basically a used car. Do not let them buffalo you. This is an Americanism which means do not let them make you something you do not want to do.
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    echoluvrstecholuvrst Member Posts: 111
    I am not sure about the ABS being necessary for cold climes. I am getting it because I have heard that it improves the braking distance in most all circumstances.

    I drove the Echo in a 30 mile an hour crosswind and had no problems.

    Regarding the noise when the Echo is driven around 80 to 90 miles an hour. That sound is not coming from the Echo. It is coming from the cop car behind the Echo. : )
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    tickbittytickbitty Member Posts: 250
    don't settle at all. get what you want. If you settle at all there should be room for renegotiation.
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    danny28danny28 Member Posts: 158
    Mario

    I live in a cold climate (Winnipeg) but I only purchased my Echo in May so I haven't given it the real test yet. So far, so good. I am really enjoying the electric heater that comes on before the engine warms up because I don't have or want an energy wasting car warmer or "Command Start" like most sissies up here use, but like most others I am a little impatient about waiting for heat to clear the windows in the morning. So far it hasn't gone much below freezing here, but the electric pre-heater and the rear window defogger clear the windows in a few minutes.This happens noticeably faster than on any other car I've driven, and I've driven a few....

    I chose not to buy antilock brakes because we get a lot of ice here in the winter, and my wife and I are the main drivers. We've both driven on ice for over 30 years. The thing is, I've read that an experienced driver in some situations can actually stop faster on ice and maintain better control with conventional brakes as long as they don't panic and lock up the wheels.

    About cross winds ,I have put about 7000 miles on it so far, about half of it on the "bald prairies" . No problem so far. My 1984 and 1988 Toyota vans were worse in cross winds and they weighed at least 1000 lbs. more.
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    danny28danny28 Member Posts: 158
    Here is the response I got:

    "Dear Daniel,

    The off topic posts have been removed. Thanks for taking the time to notify us"
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    janbeejanbee Member Posts: 127
    Im in Canada as well, I have owned my echo for about 4 weeks now and there was one morning where there was a thin layer of ice/frost on the windows, I turned the car on and turned the defrosters on and used my ice scraper to make little holes so I could see out..I jumped in the car and proceded down the driveway as I got half way down my street the windows were all clear..I was very surprised...I drove a civic for 8 years and never had it defrosted so fast!!! The echo really seems to warm up quicko!!
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    vadpvadp Member Posts: 1,025
    Hey, danny28.
    Thank you for taking care of the off topic posts.
    In my opinion ABS is a very usefull feature.
    I've driven on ice and snow too.
    In the panic situations ABS can be a life saving feature. No matter how experienced you are, it takes a lot of skill to keep a car under control in those conditions.
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    toytechtoytech Member Posts: 7
    To the person asking for snow tire suggestions, may I suggest Bridgstone Blizzacks. I've used them for 3 winters and have never had a better tire. Great in the snow and ice, quiet on bare pavement, and handle well for a snow tire. I use 4 snow tires due to the fact that you need good traction for turning and starting, but also two snows on the back for the brake system to make the best use of the tires for braking. For the price of 4 snow tires you can't replace a fender and the front bumper of most cars with the money saved by not using 4 snow tires.
    I have purchased tires from the Tire Rack for 15 years with great results, and have recommeded them to many friends and customers over those years.
    Seems strange to be talking about snow tires when it was 50 degrees today and is supposed to be in the low 60's tomorrow here in Syracuse. ;-)
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    danny28danny28 Member Posts: 158
    Thanks for the update on snow tires. i wondered about Blizzacks because I had really good luck with them on an '87 MR2 I used to own. I bought the MR2 with some high performance , very wide and very flat tires. I think they were Yokohamas. They were so flat they looked like drag racing slicks with tiny little groves in them. On dry pavement in the heat that little car cornered like it was on rails, but with the first snow i could barely get it home from work! believe it or not, I did 2 180's before I got out of the parking lot at work. I was so scared I went home at about 15 MPH.

    Any way I got a full set of blizzacks right away, and it made the MR2 handle like a normal car on ice and snow. It still wasn't great because that car had so much mass in the tail end with it's mid-engine that it always wanted to flip around in a skid like an arrow, with the heavy end first. The Blizzacks made it manageable.

    What about studs? These went out of fashion years ago here because they used to chew up the roads, but I heard that the Europeans have solved that problem by blunting the ends of the studs or something like that? Anyone out there with recent experience ?
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    echoluvrstecholuvrst Member Posts: 111
    I was wondering about the Consumer Reports issue that has the nice write up about the Echo. Is this the 2001 New Car Preview special issue or is it in a regular issue? I just got the special issue last night. If it is in a regular issue, I will need to go out and find it. I have not subscribed yet.
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    danny28danny28 Member Posts: 158
    I think it's the Dec,2000 regular issue. I went to chapters yesterday and looked at everything they had, incliding the 2001 New Car Preview, without finding it. I did find a reference to it pointing to the December issue. That's also where krakato said it was: "my december consumer reports".
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    kneisl1kneisl1 Member Posts: 1,694
    This is my evaluation of ECHO. This car is VERY lightly constructed...the size of the suspension components and fittings is the lightest I have ever seen. This is good for mileage, but POSSIBLY bad for crash results and long term reliability. But if the engineering was done right, everything should be OK. I have never seen construction of a car go to these lengths to achieve lightness. Which I think is good because we need more fuel efficient cars like ECHO.
    I have heard ECHO has a chain driven camshaft instead of the customary belt. Good for ECHO. Belt driven camshafts in invasive head engines can break resulting in engine dammage. This usually (but not always) occurs in cars past warranty, which effectivly shortens the life of the car because who is going to put a new engine in an old car?
    The car was very impressive to drive, it felt like a much larger car on the road. The car is totally cute and has that Toyota build quality. I hanv't felt so good about a new car since my last new (old) Beetle in 1974. The car is definately a winner.
    Having said that, the visibility is definately blocked to the left and right by the thick windshield pillars. The offset speedo is going to give some people problems...I hope no one gets distracted enough to have an accident before they get used to it. I mention this because my wife takes quite a while to get used to any car other than the one she is currantly driving, and there must be other people like this.
    What a great little car. We need more like this!

    Paul Kneisl

    Visibility was definately blocked to the left and right by the windshield pillars. I was really wondering what was going on behind them as I drove along.
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    danny28danny28 Member Posts: 158
    Paul
    I agree with you on all points. After having driven my Echo for 6 months now, I can reassure you on a couple of points.

    1) The front pillars definitely do block one's vision, particularly on tight turns. I have learned to move my head sideways when checking for others cars to compensate. It's automatic now so it's no big deal, but I did get a couple of surprises during my first month. You might want to pass this on to your wife as a preventative measure. Toyota have a kind of a sales training brochure that explains how the body is built to withstand crashes. The heavy front pillars are an integral part of this and are designed to transfer a large part of frontal impacts away from the occupants. So I see the sideways head movement as a small price to pay for this kind of forethought about my protection.

    2)About the offset speedo. Very few reviewers seem to understand what Toyota has done here. They all seem to focus on the minor cost saving of having one instrument panel for left and right drive vehicles. This to me is a very minor point.

    The main advantage of it, is what Toyota describe as a reduced angle of deflection required in eye movement when checking speed while driving. I think that this description must have lost a lot in the translation from the Japanese. You see, I am a driver of your vintage. My first (new)car was a '70 mini. What I've found is that my eyes don't focus as quickly as they used to. Consequently the large distance from my eyes to the speedo in the Echo makes it much easier to "acquire" the speed then get my eyes back on the road. in addition, the bright white background means my eyes don't have to adjust to a dimly lit speedo in bright sunlight. In my last vehicle, a Ford, I couldn't even see the speedo with my sunglasses on in bright sunlight. These two effects are equally if not more important than the reduced angle of deflection required. I think those Toyota engineers really did their homework on this one.

    Let me know if your experiences are consistent with mine or not. Maybe my objectivity is overwhelmed by my enthusiasm for the car......
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    krakatokrakato Member Posts: 30
    Excerpts quoted from Consumer Reports Dec, 2000 issue:

    TOYOTA ECHO

    28 mpg city, 46 mpg highway, 38 mpg overall

    Tested: 4-door, 5-speed manual

    Highs: Good acceleration, roomy interior, easy access, interior storage.
    Lows: Spartan interior look; a model with ABS can be hard to find.

    As a small commuter car, the Echo has much to recommend it. With its high roof and efficient interior packaging, it provides more interior room than some larger cars. Drivers sit high, making the car feel a little like a micro-minivan. The lowest price of the group and good fuel economy help keep costs low.


    THE DRIVING EXPERIENCE

    The Echo's ride is compliant enough but jostles at times, particularly on the highway. A full load settles it down some. Wind and engine noise permeate the cabin at higher speeds. Pronounced body roll in corners feels disconcerting at first, but the car hangs on well and a driver soon realizes that the handling is actually quite good. The Echo negotiated our avoidance maneuver reasonably well.

    Though hardly a fire-breather, the 1.5-liter Four was the quickest of this group, and we averaged 38 mpg on regular fuel. We estimate the range on one tank of fuel at almost 500 miles. The five-speed manual shifts satisfactorily but has long throws. Braking performance was very good overall, although the car veered a bit to one side on our wet divided-pavement test, even equipped with ABS.

    INSIDE THE CAR

    The roomy cockpit should allow practically anyone to get comfortable behind the controls. The rather rudimentary front seats are comfortable enough though the cushion is flat, and there's no height or lower-back adjustment, but all drivers found a good driving position. The rear seat is adequate for two adults but too narrow for three.
    The cabin lacks some of the amenities of the other cars, but offers numerous cubbies and bins. There's a sizable drawer under the passenger seat, map pockets in the front doors, and pouches behind the front seats. The center console offers a small tray and two cup holders for the front, one for the rear. The driver's side has a covered but non-illuminated Vanity mirror.

    As in the Prius, the Echo's instrument panel is located in the center of the dash, but the small markings can be hard to read. The speedometer is positioned close to the windshield, requiring a rightward glance to see your speed Most controls are intuitive, though the central door-lock switch and manual side-mirror controls are a bit hard to reach.

    The climate-control system offers plenty of heated or cooled air, but you have to fiddle with the dash vents to get everything adjusted right.

    The trunk holds up to four suitcases and an overnight case or a wheelchair, with room to spare. You can enlarge the trunk space by folding one or both halves of the rear seatback. A compact spare stores beneath the trunk floor. Trunk access is partly hampered by a very short, 7-inch front-to-rear opening. And the trunk-lid hinges can crush cargo packed beneath them.

    SAFETY AND RELIABILITY

    Safety gear includes dual front air bags and five sets of lap and shoulder belts. The front belts have adjustable upper anchors, pretensioners and force-limiters. Rear shoulder belts may tug uncomfortably on the shoulder of some passengers. Left and right . seats have adjustable head restraints that remain sufficiently tall to be effective even when lowered. The ABS package included daytime running lights, although models with this package can be hard to find
    Crash tests have yet to be performed. Bumper basher damage estimates are $572 in front, $762 in rear.

    Driving with kids: Most child seats cinch securely with no problem.

    First-year reliability has been better than average. Our car had two minor sample defects.

    HEAD ROOM Thanks to the Echo's tall roof, it's easy to get in and out of the car.


    RECOMMENDATIONS (for all 4 vehicles reviewed in the article)

    The Volkswagen Golf TDI may not be the first internal-combustion car to average more than 40 mpg, but it's certainly the best to date in overall capability . The Golf TDI is a solidly built vehicle that rides well and has a quiet, roomy, and comfortable interior. Handling and braking are sound. And it has a hatchback's versatility . (If you prefer a trunk, the Jetta TDI should provide the same inviting characteristics and excellent fuel economy as the Golf) Although acceleration comes up a bit short, most drivers will find it sufficient. The diesel engine makes for relatively dirty tailpipe emissions, if not nearly as dirty as emissions from larger truck diesels. Also, some may find filling the tank unpleasant because diesel fuel has a strong oily odor. We expect the reliability to be average based on other models.

    The Toyota Prius was the second HEV to come to the U.S. but the first that can seriously compete with conventional cars. It rides comfortably and quietly, and has a roomy rear seat and decent acceleration. Handling is average, the trunk is small, and, because of the car's regenerative braking system, the brakes are a little too sensitive and hard to modulate. Still, the Prius is a worthy contender and a legitimate choice for everyday use. Reliability is as yet unknown.

    The Toyota Echo shows that conventionally powered cars can achieve good fuel economy while still delivering reasonable performance. Our Echo's 38 mpg was the best of any conventional car we've tested recently. Acceleration is fairly sprightly, access is easy, and the rear seat is relatively roomy. Handling is sound, and the ride is reasonably quiet and comfortable, On the down side, the interior is spartan, and models with ABS can be very hard to find Reliability, has been better than average.

    The Honda Insight achieved the best fuel economy of any car we've tested, 51 mpg overall. But you pay for that in lack of accommodations, comfort and drivability . The Insight's ride is barely tolerable and the car is very noisy. Although acceleration is reasonable against the clock, in everyday driving the car requires a lot of shifting and it can take a bit of effort to keep up with other vehicles on the highway. Handling is secure on smooth roads. We did not have sufficient data in our recent survey to predict its reliability

    [The article also contains comparison charts, an overall ratings table and a box with CR's graphical rating system for the ECHO's Ratings & Test results in the categories of: performance, comfort, convenience, reliability, acceleration, braking from 60 mph, and fuel economy. The Echo got "Very Good" on all features with the exception of "Excellent" on the climate control system, and "Good" on: emergency handling, ride, with no cargo, rear-seat comfort, and trunk.]
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    cliffy1cliffy1 Member Posts: 3,581
    In response to post #176, what you experienced is evidence of how far this business still needs to come. I am no longer in "Internet Sales" but when I was, all my responses had a price quote in the first contact letter. It probably cost me a few deals by customers who walked into other stores with my price but I think it generated a lot of trust.

    I can still sell cars long distance. On a car like the ECHO, it wont save you enough money to be economicly wise but I can do it.
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    danny28danny28 Member Posts: 158
    Great report ! Thanks for taking the trouble to copy it to our forum. When are you starting a Tucson Echo Club ? Maybe we could start up a tour route of the South-central US since that seems to be where most of the Echo interest is. Those of us farther North, I'm sure wouldn't mind a little trip South to stretch out our Echopods.....

    By the way, if a Martian landed TODAY in a Martian Echopod and said "TAKE ME TO YOUR LEADER ! " What would you do ?
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    danny28danny28 Member Posts: 158
    Don't worry about the changes. I started on the internet at:http://www.toyota.ca/avalon_index.html

    , got a quote from their "ACCESS" program then had to proceed to the dealers (5 of them) to get a real trade-in price on my Ford. I finally bought my Echo from a showroom floor salesman. The initial quotes just help me to zero-in on the best deal. I went back to each of the dealers a few times to make sure they would'nt move. The written quote guys did give me a sense of trust I didn't get with the arm wavers.
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    bklynboybklynboy Member Posts: 16
    I've looked at NHTSA and Consumer Reports online, and I can't find out about the recall mentioned here. A guy I used to work with mentioned in passing something about "brakes", but I don't know anything more.

    As a second thing -- are ABS 4 doors hard to come by?

    I went and saw a Honda dealership today -- the new Civic feels really small inside. I kept knocking my knee and really had to crank the seat way back. I'm going to see the Echo (again) this weekend. Got a call back from the same dealer I already went to in person, regarding an Autobytel purchase request I put in. What is the protocol regarding the first salesman I saw (in person) versus the salesperson who handles the dealer's Internet purchasing? My guess is just to tell the Internet salesperson and let them settle it, but I don't want to give her any reason to jack up the price unnecessarily.
    Thanks to all.
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    krakatokrakato Member Posts: 30
    See:

    http://www.nhtsa.dot.gov/cars/problems/recalls/mmy.cfm

    and enter Toyota Echo 2000

    it's only for vehicles manufactured Aug 99 - Mar 2000 and the recall is limited to certain states.
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    dianne4toyotadianne4toyota Member Posts: 343
    OK, I reported a while back as to a strange vibration, and 5 fixes later, we've found it. They kept fixing what they thought it was, and NOW it's solved! There's a channel that the remote trunk release cables rest in, and if they are somewhat loose, they make the rear of the car vibrate. They are pretty well secured and covered, so it took ingenuity to find it but one of our best mechanics figured it out. No more vibrations! YAY!

    -Dianne
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    melodyechomelodyecho Member Posts: 19
    I noticed an earlier post that stated the owner was impressed with the quick defrost of the Echo. I just had my first icy windows to deal with. The front windows do defrost very quickly. The side mirrors I keep adjusting the side vents to try to improve that. Glad to see consumer reports likes our little Echo.
    On another topic. I have really been impressed with the height of the car for entry into the seat and for getting things out of the trunk.
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    janbeejanbee Member Posts: 127
    I have had my ECHO for about 4 weeks now and I really think it has a great stereo system..I have the CD player with 4 speakers and it really sounds great!! even my bf has said it is amazing..is this an average stereo for a car?? I had a civic before my ECHO (no CD though) and it didnt have the quality that the ECHO has, any comments????
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    machodude23machodude23 Member Posts: 2
    Can somebody suggest me where I can get the following features in an ECHO.

    1> Air conditioning.
    2> Automatic Transmission.
    3> ABS.
    4> Power Steering.
    5> Power Brakes.
    6> Anti theft alarm system.
    7> Side air bags.

    What would it cost me as the whole ?? I mean how much do I have to pay for it ??

    I would appreciate an early response, because I am dying to lay my hands on an ECHO. I am just in love with this car.

    Some of the dealers, I visited informed me that right now the ECHOs available in the market are not shipped with the ABS and the side airpillows.

    So, if you can suggest any dealer providing me these facilities, I would be very thankful to you.

    Cheerz,

    Mario.
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    kneisl1kneisl1 Member Posts: 1,694
    Yes it was very helpful to mention to my wife that the thick front pillars help in the event of a crash.I am not seriously bothered by them (or anything else!) I know that in time one becomes adapted to most anything! I wonder about the standards of the Japanese crash tests: are they comparable to ours? (I understand the car has not been crash tested here yet) The salesman claimed that ECHO crash tested better than the CAMRY. Truth or Fiction?

    Paul
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    danny28danny28 Member Posts: 158
    If you scroll back on this topic and look at previous posts you should find some discussions about crash testing in Japan. There is even a link to an auto graveyard that shows what happened to echos in real crashes, that is, if you're up to it ! Apparently some of the wrecks on that site are grisly. I didn't look, but the reports on this site indicate that all the Echos fared well.

    If I remember correctly, the discussions were earlier in echo7, but may go back to echo6 as well.
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    danny28danny28 Member Posts: 158
    I found the same thing with the Hondas. I'm only 5'9", but my head rubbed on the sunroof trim on the Honda Civic Si I test drove.

    About the showroom etiquette;

    I don't know if this is correct, or not, but it's what I do and it allows me to get in an out quickly, with a clear conscience. Remember that none of this amounts to anything until you actually close a deal, so you don't need to sweat it too much if you're going to several dealers.

    Whenever I talk to anyone I ask them for their card. Then if I go back there, I ask if that person is available. Usually they're busy or not there. If so, I go to the receptionist and ask if anyone else can help me. They usually know who the jerks are, and will direct you to the most civilized salesperson. You can even tell them the kind of salesperson you want. It's amazing how much inside help you can get from a receptionist if you empower them this way.

    When I talk to salesperson #2, or #3, I get their cards as well. Then when it comes time to close the deal, it's usually with a "business person" anyway, and not the salesman, so you can pull out whatever cards you feel reflect the help that you got and tell them. "this person gave me the most help etc...." If there was more than one, all the dealers have their own internal rules for splitting commissions.

    I hope this helps.
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    danny28danny28 Member Posts: 158
    I just got the standard AM-FM-tape unit with 4 speakers, but it really puts out good sound. My experience on other Toyotas is that they usually install quality sound systems in their cars.

    After 6 months with my Echo I'm still excited about it too ! I'm happy for you.
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    dianne4toyotadianne4toyota Member Posts: 343
    They are right. That's an order-built car for certain. If you are anywhere close to the west coast, SoCal, please feel free to reach me at dianne@earthlink.net because you won't be able to get that car from normal dealer stock.

    -Di
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    krakatokrakato Member Posts: 30
    A Tucson Echo Club would be a neat idea -- if I had the time for it -- think I'll have to stick with this Virtual Edmunds Echo Club (VEEC?) in the meantime. I don't see too many Echos down here, but there are a few.

    I don't know what kind of response an Echopod Martian should get to the take-me-to-your-leader question after "Indecision 2000" !!!! What times we live in!
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    bklynboybklynboy Member Posts: 16
    Thanks for the tips, Danny28. I finally got a quote from the dealer for my Autobytel purchase request. $13213 (without tax and dmv fees) for a 2001 4 door with automatic, air, power steering, amfm cassette and floormats. I heard the same thing from the dealer internet sales rep that Machodude did -- "we have a pipeline here, and we can look down the production run 3 months, and there are no ABS cars and no side airbag cars even on the pipeline".

    Handholding question -- how important are ABS and side airbags? I know it's a pretty small car, and city traffic is cluttered and merciless. There are way too many giant SUVs here (like Brooklyn has mountains).
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    sjobinsjobin Member Posts: 1
    Hi,

    I am looking into buying a new Toyota Echo in Alberta, Canada.
    This is my first new car purchase.

    I am looking into buying a two-door, 2001 Echo with package B (Color-keyed Bumpers, Door handles, Intermittent Wipers, Manual Remote Control Mirrors, AM/FM/ CD), also has Air Conditioning, Rear Spoiler, tinted windows and Mag Wheels (Potenza 14" Progrezive - RE910 P19330R15).

    They quoted a price of $17,760 Canadian. Can you tell me the TMV for this specific car in Canadian dollars? If not then can tell me than where can I get that information?

    They also said that you can't get ABS with this car, I have read that you can. I wonder if this is only in Canada?

    Any advice would be great.

    Thanks.
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    janbeejanbee Member Posts: 127
    Hi there, I bought my 2000 ECHO about 4 weeks ago and it cost me $16,200 canadian after the grad rebate ($16,997 before the rebate), the sticker price on the car was $17,800. My 2000 ECHO is a 4 door, with A/C, CD, spoiler, body side moulding, colour keyed bumpers and handles, automatic, intermittent wipers, they say its tinted although it doesnt look to tinted, I must have the same package that you are interested in....I almost bought a 2001 Echo but it didnt have the spoiler or moulding although it did have power door locks, Ill find my quotes and let you know what they quoted me for a 2001 tonite..The 2001 would have cost me more in terms of financing because they were clearing the 2000's at a rate of 0.7% and the 2001's had a rate of 5.7%..I am very happy with my black beauty, let us know what happens!!!! Btw, Im in Ontario!
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    echoluvrstecholuvrst Member Posts: 111
    I think people on this board would find it helpful if someone would post the interest rates that Toyota charges those with excellent credit, good credit, fair credit, and poor credit. Will Toyota even deal with someone with poor credit? Also, what is the amount of down payment (expressed as a percentage) that people in those situations can expect to pay?
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    janbeejanbee Member Posts: 127
    Im wondering if financing is different in Canada than the US?? When I looked at the 2001 they told me the financing rate would be 5.7% and the 2000 would be 0.7% (it was even advertised in the newspaper) this was all before I applied for financing...and when I handed in the application the sales rep said he faxed it to toyota canada and I was approved within 5 minutes..btw I have no credit history at all, I own no credit cards and I live with my parents..how does this compare with the US????
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    echoluvrstecholuvrst Member Posts: 111
    There may have been a number of factors that led toward your quick approval. These factors were probably how long you have been at your job, how long you have been at your residence (even though it is your parents), your income, and how much you put down. It might also include your age.

    Perhaps Cliffy1 or Dianne4Toyota can shed some light on whether or not the guidelines for ToyotaCanada are the same for ToyotaUSA in terms of financing.
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